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Research General

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Thread replies: 215
Thread images: 29

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What kind of research is /sci/ doing?

Tell us about the research you're working on. Ask for or offer second opinions. Suggest ideas for new experiments. Offer advice for posters looking to get into research work.


All scientific fields are welcome - from physics to psychology, life sciences to linguistics.
>>
>>6568708
Haven't you figured it out? Everyone here is a high-schooler.
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>>6568708
OP's pic
"Oh, it's a liquid."
"Yep my son, that is a liquid."
>>
Extraction and purification of ergine from morning glory seeds using ion chromatography and isoelectric focusing.

No, it isn't original work, and no I'm not doing it to synthesize LSD or to consume/sell it.
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I'm an undergrad and I working on the phenotypic plasticity of grasses; are native grasses more adaptable to adverse conditions in contrast to non-native invasive species?
To explain phenotypic plasticity a little more simply- think about how some people tan while others burn in reaction to the sun. people who tan better have a higher phenotypic plasticity and can produce more pigment in reaction.
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What are properties of ergine?
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Photodynamic Therapy, searching for new compounds. I'm working with simulations on big ass clusters, i think it's fun.
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cfd mostly with porous media
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What do you mean by big ass clusters? Of what exactly I mean.
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>>6568708
Plasma Physics - mostly studying properties of waves using a linear device (Q Machine).

Currently studying how filamental quenching of EIC waves depends on the geometry of current channels in the plasma.
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>>6568773
>Photodynamic Therapy
Not familiar with it, but it sounds interesting - could you go into more detail?
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>>6568774
cfd?
>>
Computational Fluid Dynamics. Using computer algorithms to analyze and predict the flow of movement.
-Wikipedia
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Disulfide lipophilic compounds.
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>>6568708
Dat image. Why do people seem to think that chemists spend their lives staring at test tubes?
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>>6568829
Because people are morons.
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>>6568829
BC we look at semen alot, although agreed.
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>>6568829
Because our actual work is either difficult to see, or looks a lot more boring. So when the school comes by the lab for a photo-op we pose with the older-looking grad student and make shit up. Though I'd say that pic is a biological lab working with animal/human samples, and given use of latex instead of nitrile, that they're not working with DNA
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>>6568798
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photodynamic_therapy

Wikipedia do it better than me.
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>>6568789
What kind of waves are you studying? Are plasma waves like electromagnetic waves or like fluid waves?
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>>6568803
computational fluid dynamics
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>>6568867
Waves in plasmas are a combination of fluid and EM effects (most of the equations for plasma behavior can actually be derived by just adding in the Lorentz Force to the Navier-Stokes Equation).

In the majority of cases (as far as I'm aware), the waves involve a physical compression and rarification of particles in the plasma - but because you're dealing with charged particles instead of neutral ones - the waves have electromagnetic properties as well.

The waves I'm currently studying are the Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron waves.

Applying a sufficient voltage bias to a probe in a quasineutral plasma creates a relative drift between ions and electrons in the plasma which creates a longitudinal, acoustic instability in the plasma.
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I'm sort of an "Internet Librarian". I'm trying to document and archive many websites across the WWW.

Upon coming halfway through my documentations, I became enthralled by how Anonymity affects the average person.

It turned into a snowball effect, and now I'm studying how the Internet has affected society, and Human cognition and interaction

Pic related, it's your brain right now
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>>6568872
Are you our AMA aerospace guy?

> with porous media
that sounds exciting. Lots of wetting, right?
>>
>>6568954
you sound like my friend sam
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>>6568708
I don't do shit and I just decided I'm better of learning science here and with book than paying thousands of dollars for studies.
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Haven't done any research work (just finished first year of undergrad).

I know most of the faculty here does research work but how does one go about getting involved? Do you need to apply for research work or grants or something?
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>>6569389
Your university may have programs for research experiences for undergrads
You could also just ask to work with a professor whose work you find interesting.
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>>6569389
1) Do Your Research - Look up faculty on your department's website and find people who are doing research you think would be interesting.

2) Just Ask - Find a professor you'd like to work for and send them an email explaining (briefly) who you are and that you'd like to talk to them about working as an undergraduate research assistant. Ask to meet with them in person during their office hours (or whenever else is convenient for them) and come prepared with some simple questions you have about what they're doing.


Most professors are happy to take on undergrads as research assistants. Your professor or his grad students will help you to learn the material and skill you'll need, and you may even get paid if they've got a decent grant behind their research.


Good luck!
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>>6569453
>>6569987
Awesome - thanks for the tips!
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>>6568708
I'm not doing any research. I just read a lot of science books. I don't think I'm going to be a scientist, my major is computer programming. I still like reading science books though.
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I used to do x-ray studies of organic semiconductors. But I finally defended my thesis and got the fuck out.

Now I'm unemployed.
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>>6568708
I stick my dick into various openings I find throughout the day and write abuot it on my blug.

Am I doing science yet?
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Systematic Review on the ocurrence of depression and anxiety in diabetes type 2 fat fagets.
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>>6568708
I'm currently assisting in a phylogenetic analysis of Pterospora andromedea and it's rhizopogon symbiots. I'm mostly doing the grunt working of extracting dna, pcr, and setting up for gene sequencing which is done in a different lab. I find some of it interesting. Gave me a new respect for fungus because of how hard it is to extract dna from it.
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>>6569389
Ask, I just transfered to a new university and in one month had an internship just because I asked around a bit. Your university probably has a resource for finding open internships.
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>>6568975
sorry for the late answer, no i am not this guy. i post here like one time per year ..
it is not that exciting and mostly done for optimization of the porous media burner
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>>6568850
Very cool - what kind of treatments are you working on?
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Cell/mol. biology.
Working on a protein that is a central signaling component between cell death and proliferation. Currently looking at how posttranslational modifications affects the cellular localization and signaling function of the protein. Basic research but I think it will allow for some practical applications in the future.
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>>6570230
Is that the official medical term?
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Cluster assembled materials for use in electronic and magnetic devices is my focus.
The actual work I have done is recreating one particular family of these. Also, running tons of various measurements of materials for other labs (XRD, XPS, SQUID, NMR, EPR). And learning how to repair/modify the equipment for various uses.
In the past I was making topological insulator nanoparticles which exhibited superconductivity when doped, building a QPSK and variable AC to DC power converter for controlling an 8T magnet for NMR as well as getting it up to 8T from 0 field, and preparing all of the mechanical and electronic set-up for such. Finally, between my undergrad and my current grad program I was making various modified Perovskites which exhibited superconductivity under doping and studying these using XRD.
Ideally I would also like to come up with an all encompassing theory of superconductivity - but I'm not holding my breath on that one
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Mathematical models applied to refrigerator pricing. Economics is a real science.
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>>6569389
Just talk to faculty, chances are someone will be interested in hiring you
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>>6570900
Calpain system?
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>>6570881
I'm not sure actually, just searching new compounds. I'm probably working with tumours (just started, i don't know shit yet).
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Drug discovery to optimize a splice-correcting drug for a rare disease.

Made some great progress over the past 2 years. Works in our patient cells, works in our mouse model. We have the paper written, we just wont be publishing until we patent.
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>>6569987

Do you do this during school semesters or during the summer months?

Also what skills would be desirable?

I'm a physics student as well and there is a theoretical department of high energy physics and another one of computational physics that seem accessible.

I have some programming experience. Do you think I got a chance?
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>>6571616

Who's buying the patent? Your uni I take it.
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>>6571683
Research hospital. Mass general, actually. They will be buying it.
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studying interfacial rheology of a complex fluid for an REU
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IR spec for real-time moisture analysis.

Is as boring as it sounds.
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modeling diabetic retinopathy using mice.
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Cosmology and galaxy evolution. Specifically looking at geometric tests of cosmology and the gas cycle of high redshift galaxies (star formation and circumgalactic gas).
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Early stages of solar system formation, flying our experiment on a microgravity flight in the no-so-distant future
On a semi-related note, lab supervisor just got this based (but old) high-power vacuum chamber for free from surplus. You can tell it was used for plasma physics because there are rainbows on the inside where there were once magnetic field lines.
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>>6571642
>Do you do this during school semesters or during the summer months?
Either, it's going to depend more on whether there are active research projects going on and whether or not the professor is interested in taking on new assistants than it will on the time of year.

>Also what skills would be desirable?
A little programming skill will help but honestly most of the skills you'll need will be stuff that the professor or grad students will show you (I certainly didn't have any Q-machine experience when I asked my mentor about research work two years ago). A lot of the stuff you start out doing will be general labor. If you're working with an experimentalist that usually means making basic measurements and crunching data, if you're working with a theorist that means lots and lots of derivations.

What kinds of research are you looking to get into?


>>6571770
Very cool. So solar system formation, microgravity flights, and vacuum chambers. I'm guessing accretion studies using dusty plasmas?
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Raman spectroscopy, it's pretty interesting and complicated.

In sort of a research slump right now though where I don't know what to do with myself.
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>>6571742

That does sound boring. Who funds that research?
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>>6571742
>not wanting to be able to monitor moisture buildup on critical systems in real-time
For shame
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>>6571792
Yes on the accretion, but no on the dusty plasmas. I did suggest the use of dusty plasmas to the supervisor though, but she did her thesis on some other type of plasma physics so it could be used for any number of things!
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>>6571808
Interesting - would you please go into more detail about the experiment?

(one of the professors at the graduate school I'm starting at in the Fall does plasma/vacuum chamber work on microgravity flights so I'm very interested in hearing more)
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>>6571795
>mfw it turns out to be top secret clearance DARPA project
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Arithmetic and graph-based Ramsey theory. Like all math research, it's a lot of sitting and thinking, writing a few things down, shaking your head, then sitting and thinking again.
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Doing capillary electrophoresis research with one of my chemistry professors
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Researching auxin-like growth inhibitors found in Cyanobacteria species Scytonema Hofmanni, and how it acts as a dual anti-oxidant and growth slower, without eventually damaging a plant (contrary to NAA a toxic chemical currently in use). TL;DNR I'm cryogenically preserving plant species and maybe the answer to human cryogenics rests in these types of growth regulators as well? Or at least oxygen sensitive organ farming/preserving (like brains)?
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>>6572304
Chemicals could be the answer to a mobile, unfrozen cryogenic state. Especially if you could get cellular growth not only to slow, but renew itself by reverting back to stem cells and into designated cells again. (I've read research where scientists revert skin cells to stem and back.)
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>>6568708
using AI to make nanomachines.

They won't look anything like pic related, but they will definitely have moving parts with atomic precision(if we can make them)!
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behavioural studies and neuroscience in philosophical form

...Im learning the chemistry on the way
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>>6568708
I'm not completely certain yet, but I think that it's something to do with geometric algebra and electrodynamics. Just waiting on my results to see if I get accepted for it.
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>>6568708
I'm using a souped up pimped out version of one of these babies to investigate catalysis. Cant divulge anything more than that, sorry corporate hush hush.
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>>6572304
Even if it doesn't eventually lead to human cryostasis - being able to preserve plant life is huge
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Structural biology and mechanistic biochemistry: structural and biochemical/mechanistic studies to characterize viral-host protein-nucleotide complex assembly.
.
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multiphase flow through fractured porous media.

it's a hoot.
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How LPA and subsequent signal cascades affect the development, proliferation, and migration of ovarian cancer.
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>>6572396
>FEI TEM
ooooh, nice. I used to work for FEI, at the time they started collaborating with Phillips Electron Optics.
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>>6572605
Holy hell
I actually need this data, since I'm working on fuel cells (basically glorified metal-air batteries).

Affect of pore sizes are membranous layers on exchange of electrons are not fully understood yet, and you may hold the key to our research, anon.
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>>6572336
What are you applying for? An REU? Grant?
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>>6572826
Also - anyone else notice this thread is apparently already in autosage?
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>>6572830
Mods gonna mod
Gotta make room for more "consciousness", "0.999...=1" and "muh IQ" threads.
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Borate fusion of transitional metal oxides.

>chromium
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We're looking at how language affects memory.

It's nothing special, but I might as well participate in the thread
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What causes pollution in a river and what people have done to stop it.

Very complicated, very complicated indeed
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>>6573036
By all means, please go into detail.
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undergrad looking at surfece enhanced IR using alumina nano particles

just starting, like 3rd day today so Im hardly an expert
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Is everyone here pursuing a phd?
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how many of you actually use the finite elements method?
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>>6573086
You're an undergrad so you're not even doing research. Just the bitch work for the people doing the real heavy lifting.

Kindly delete your post and exit this thread.
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>>6573119
I did original research as a undergrad. Got published too.

Fairly trivial part of math, but all my own work.
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>>6573119
Jesus christ you need to kill yourself ASAP. I'm an undergrad who's also doing (paid) original research and co-authoring a paper... it's really not that uncommon a situation.
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>>6571828

>>6571808 here. I'm the guy doing research on accretion processes in early planetary formation.

We're attempting to gain insight into how planetescimals attracted and stuck to matter to grow from marble-sized objects to city-sized objects. Current models say gravity is the dominant force in accretion from city-size upward, but there is currently no solid model to explain accretion in the size range we're looking at.
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>>6573144
im the guy hes bitching about, pretty much same situation. getting paid, free room and seems like its self directed so far (with another student partner)
>>
>had bachelors thesis
>do zero work and hand in shit project
>previously had perfect grades
>pretty sure I've passed the project but only a bare minimum pass

>always hated my subject and uni

Please massage my feels and IQ. Do my lecturers see me as nothing but an exambabby now? Is research some sort of large indication of intelligence?
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>>6573188
I'll have to do my bachelor thesis next month. Any advice how to not end up like you? I'm an exambabby too.
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>>6573194

the only advice I'd have given myself is to actually do the work. I really hate my subject and can't stand doing it
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I didn't research and now I can only regret it.
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>>6568736
*/sci/ fags discussing metaphysics*
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>>6568708
Genetic analysis on oil-producing algae and transformation of genes that code for lipid promoter regions into other algaes for biofuel production.
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If I fucked up my bachelors thesis (barely pass), am I doomed to never get in to a good PhD?

I'm doing my masters year next (I'm doing an MEng degree) and it has a 30 credit course where you do two 20 page research papers (compared to the 45 credit, 50 to 70 page bachelor thesis). Will this be good enough for me to redeem myself?

I know people say that you should pick a Grad uni based on research etc, but would I look like a tryhard pleb/snob if I only applied for PhDs at Cambridge / Imperial / UCL? I don't think I could bear doing a PhD unless I was guaranteed a great job afterwards, and the best recruiters go to these unis.
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I work with terminology
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Graphene.
1 Dimensional superconducting wires, near 100% efficiency solar cells, filtration and Dynamical mass generation via space compactification.
>>
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>>6573158
Interesting. Sounds a lot like some of the microgravity experiments I heard described when I was visiting Auburn

What kind of alternate processes have been suggested?
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>>6568708

PhD student, cognitive psychology, I'm working on experiments to prove my director's new theory on analogical thinking, specifically for the subprocess of evaluating the quality of analogies.
>>
Working with titania for use in dental composites and testing genotoxicity of titania nanoparticles.
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>>6573546
> working on experiments to prove
no
just no
it should be
"to test"
pls leave
/sci/
and science
>>
>>6573380
>near 100% efficiency solar cells
>what is shockley limit
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>>6573674
Well, that's what you get when psychologists try to science... My experimental psych prof had SUCH a chip on his shoulder, I surmised it was because he wanted to be respected as a scientist and so frequently hadn't been because, well, psych.
Don't get me wrong, I've nothing against psych, it's where I got my B.S... just sayin
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>>6573158
Why wouldn't it be gravity? What else could it be?
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>>6573739
If the dust clouds were dense enough to behave like a fluid it could be gravity in combination with fluid-like phenomena
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>>6568708
>how much shitposting can one fill /sci/ with
It's my thesis. Wanna read my first draft?
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>>6574033
yes
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>>6574033
This has been a pretty productive thread.

If you want to share you thesis go right ahead and post a link
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>>6573380
What type of efficiency to be at 100%?
As stated, your post is bullshit.
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>>6573747
I know viscosity of accreting matter plays a role in black hole phenomena, but I don't know if you would see similar phenomena develop in something like a stellar nursery or an accreting planetessimal
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>>6574125
>near 100%
dude
I mean

duuuuude

It's true that he's bullshitting, but you're cherry picking the wrong tree.
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>>6573194

Look around, pick a group/subject you actually like. See what projects people have for you. Pray to god your school organizes a tour so you can check everything out

Having a good project at a good group is a winning formula
>>
I'm trying to automatically locate and mark gold particles in EM images/stitches
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Working to prevent landslides through geophysical tomographic survey.
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>>6574376
>I'm trying to automatically jew out the tiniest of shekels
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>>6574382
How does that work? Do you use seismic/GPR data to map out areas and look at the data to figure out what areas are high risk?
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>>6574480
>>>/pol/
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>>6574480

I didn't even consider it that way... Well fuck
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>>6574683
>>
I just tried to make allyl bromide from allyl alcohol. Started by dissolving 1.2 mol : 1.0 mol ratio of potassium bromide to allyl alcohol in water, then adding 10 mol ratio of sulfuric acid on an ice bath with stirring. Slow addition of the acid caused a color change from yellow to red. Distillation of the mixture caused it to blacken and foam a lot. A little bit of distillate passed over starting at 50 degrees, stopping at about 88. Allyl bromide should boil at ~70, and the only side products I can think of should boil at much higher temperatures. Only recovered a little puddle on the bottom of the flask; haven't yet figured out how much.
>>
working on a new method of testing olfaction (smell) thresholds, in preparation for another study using the new method to investigate the relationship between impaired smell and psychopathology (parkinsons and schiz have been pretty promising, based on other research).

It's okay.
>mfw when I'm a psych grad doing basic chem to make a stimuli for psychophysics experiments
>>
>>6570918
woah woah woah. What university are you at? That sounds extremely similar to what I do.
>>
>>6573303
nobody cares about your bachelor really. they do care about improvement, motivation, and thoroughness in your masters. good results help, too.
>>
>>6573681
still not 100% but..

The Shockley–Queisser limit only applies to cells with a single p-n junction; cells with multiple layers can outperform this limit. In the extreme, with an infinite number of layers, the corresponding limit is 86% using concentrated sunlight

solar cells are certainly not limited to pn junctions, either.

that said, anon is almost certainly just full of shit.
>>
>>6575718
>solar cells are certainly not limited to pn junctions, either.
What other options are there?

(sorry if this is a noob question but I know next to nothing about solar cells and solid state physics)
>>
>>6568751
Sounds cool anon, good luck. I'll be working in a plant development lab this summer, working on apical dominance and auxin canalization. It's fun stuff, you should check it out.
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>>6568708
Aerospace engineer is welcome?
>>
>>6576573
Absolutely
>>
the easiest way to do experiments..and already a common sense approach is to keep a control sample.

if done without bias results will show more prominently.

in most cases it is a sound method if resource consuming.
>>
>>6568708
Studying supersymmetric quantum fields theories in 5 and 6 dimensions, the AGT conjecture and the relation of these things to countings of 3d partitions and topological string theories. Struggling to better understand the refined topological vertex formalism and apply to theories on more general CY/SE geometries.
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>>6568736
lol'd
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>>6568736
>>
>>6573739
>>6573747
>>6574189
Accretion guy here. Gravity can't be responsible for accretion of objects below 1km radius because the orbiting gas within a proto-solar system's accretion disk causes turbulence which dominates small objects with such weak gravitational force.

>>6573443
Electrostatic forces are the main (and only as far as I know) suspect, so we're looking for inelastic collisions between planetesimal and dust particles and how their frequency of occurrence relates to the relative velocities in these collisions.
>>
>>6576802
lol if you're struggling with that you should probably just get a job at burger king
>>
>>6577141
>Electrostatic forces are the main (and only as far as I know) suspect
This is sounding disturbingly close to 'electric universe' models
>>
>>6577122
I lol every time I see that picture

I'm an engineer, so I develop tools to make research possible. My first job after uni was developing a wood analysis machine. It was a CAT scanner (for trees), but ussing gamma rays instead of x-rays. I wore a radiation detector and got to go home early if I every absorbed the max recommended levels before the day was up. The machine could make a 3D image of a log down to the cellular level. This was extremely useful for academic research and the lumber/paper industry.
>>
>>6576802
I understood most of that, but what's the AGT conjecture? I keep seeing that term used but nobody ever explains it.
>>
>>6577141
Why would the turbulence prevent accretion?
>>
>>6574658
Pretty much looks like it's still a developing technique in its early stages.
I haven't started the project yet (and haven't received much of a primer from the prof in charge), but it seems to revolve mostly around the interface above the bedrock. The paper I read was interdisciplinary, so I can't profess accurately on all the aspects just yet. However I could glean from the journal reading that water retention and pore space play a key role in considering what would be, as you say, high risk.
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>>6568708
dye sensitized solar cells
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>>6578124
Beats me
>>
>>6578124
Because the gasses blow accreted matter off of the planetesimal at a rate much greater than it can accrete new matter through gravitation. No progress can be made at that stage without electrostatic forces.
>>
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Trying to get my "state-of-the-art" MI-ESR setup from 1960 to work so people like accretion disk guy can find out what's in dust clouds.

The heater for the diffusion pump is tripping the ground leakage circuit breaker. Anyone got a quick fix?
>>
>>6580057
Diffusion pumps are notoriously finicky. Do you have alternatives (ex turbopump) or are you just stuck with what you've got?
>>
>>6580074
You're telling me. Don't really have any alternatives at the moment.
>>
>>6579792
Awesome! Good luck with your work
>>
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We're bringing econophysics back, baby!
>>
Marinebiofag here.

Research project on prawn population structure in our local estuary as well as several projects involving growing commercially useful microalgae in close and open systems.
>>
>>6572326
where do you work?
Also, I want to get into the field, but have a philosophy/history of science background(worked in a neuroscience lab as a tech all this year). Any suggestions re: how to catch up with the necessary background? Books/classes?
>>
I work in a lab that is doing a yeast two-hybrid screening on plant ATP sulfurylase.

Fun stuff I know
>>
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Quark Gluon Plasma. I'm investigating the state in which our universe was in his first miliseconds with use of rellativistic hydrodynamics.
Such conditions can be created in heavy ion collisions at CERN.
>>
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first year undergrad in astronomy and physics here. Maybe some of you could help me out...

I'm just started doing research with an observational cosmologist (will start more officially in the fall) but he gave me this graph and told me to normalize the SED's by stellar mass. The second peak in these blackbody curves is due to the dust present in the galaxies (which peaks at the far-IR) so I believe I have to integrate the graphs until that peak to get the stellar mass. Problem is, I don't know what software to work with in order to complete this; all he said was to start learning python or IDL before the fall semester and since python is more applicable I've been learning that (not very difficult) but still I don't know the machinery needed to solve this.
I'd really like to make a good impression (this is my first project I've done with a professor I really like) so does anyone have any tips on how to get this done? He also said not worry about the specific galaxies or data points; the general shape is fine.

Thanks to anyone that can help out in advance, I truly appreciate it
>>
>>6582720
Congrats on getting research in your first year and you seem to have quite a handle particularly for a first year.

I moving into observational cosmology but at the moment I am in solar flares so I have little experience of what you're doing and I don't really get the peak stuff you're talking about. I can help with IDL and programming more generally.

What format are the SEDs in. Is it data files, model parameters, a curve function?
>>
>>6582666
So, is that like the liquid drop model?
Care to elaborate?
>>
I'm studying the ratios between the edges of 3-vertex convex polytopes in the euclidean plane, where two of the edges are orthogonal.
>>
>>6582745
Thanks!
When I say the dust peaks at the far IR, I mean that the primary wavelength that the dust emits at is in the far IR. This professor didn't give me any of these files, just the graphs; I've gathered he's looking more for just an overall fit rather than specific data. He said he'll explain it to me properly in the fall, but I wanted to get a head start now.

He gave me these links for in introduction to SED's along with the paper that the graph is actually from.

http://adlibitum.oats.inaf.it/silva/grasil/modlib/modlib.html

http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl/HERSCHELDUST/ddale.pdf
>>
>>6582720
>>6582745
Also, a little more analysis on the graph:

The really dusty galaxies (ULIR, Starburst) are like this because these galaxies are sites of lots of star formation, which is also why the peak on the right end of the curve (which is from the dust) is so intense, especially compared to the peak from starlight. On the other hand, elliptical galaxies have a very low star formation rate which means not a lot of dust which can also be seen on the graph.
>>
>>6582770
No I get the peak flux thing I just don't see how it relates to stellar mass (mass of dust, star formation rate, galaxy mass?).

What do you mean by an overall fit? Is this a general procedure you are developing or are you fitting curves you don't have original data of?

Are you fitting using those models?
>>
>>6582793
When I had a brief meeting with him, I believe he said that by integrating up to the point of the dust's blackbody would give me stellar mass. And yeah I believe I'm fitting curves that I have no original data of, just to get the shape. He basically wanted me to take away how to graph from this project. He didn't really give me the data of the graphs or any specifics, so I'm just as lost as you are.
>>
>>6582796
Stellar mass of what exactly? My guess would be star formation?

>He didn't really give me the data of the graphs or any specifics
The projects that are very hands off in terms of the supervisor can be both difficult and rewarding. The nice thing is you hopefully solve a problem by yourself and can explain to to someone else down the line. If you apply to grad school a lot of it rides on past projects and your ability to explain what you did.

I think in your case all will be revealed. Supervisors can often be short on the details before you start just because often the student isn't going to be thinking about it and they might not have figured it out either.

My suggestion would be to do a bit of reading on how models of far IR spectra are constructed. I don't know my about galaxies but in debris disks fit their distributions with a power law sum of black bodies. I would suggest reading a review paper if you can find one. I thin having a greater look at the topic may be more useful if you don't have enough to go on right now.
>>
>>6582811
Stellar mass of the galaxy
And yeah I'm currently working through 2 lengthy papers he just gave me which are giving me more info on the topic. Thanks for your help, I'm sure all will be revealed too this time
>>
>>6582814
>Stellar mass of the galaxy
How does that work if ellipticals are often much larger and yet emit less at the longer wavelengths?

I don't know if he gave you this one but it seems to be what you're doing. It may be worth a glance.

http://arxiv.org/pdf/1206.1595v1.pdf

Everyone who cares panics about their first project and tries to over prepare. Reading what he gives you is often the best you can do. Familiarising yourself with python and IDL would smooth things out too. IDL is very common in astronomy and it's not hard, it's more intuitive than python anyway.

My advice would be to print the papers he gave you and highlight the bits you don't understand. If you really don't understand get stuck into the related references.
>>
>>6582817
Thanks for the paper, will read it, and yeah I am panicking a bit heh. Do you happen to have any resources for learning IDL?
>>
>>6582828
It's quite similar to matlab if you've ever used it. It's very good with arrays and matrices.

I have used this one in the past I think it's quite good.

https://www.cfa.harvard.edu/~scranmer/Ay201a/Data/idl_basics.pdf
>>
>>6582849
excellent, thanks a million my friend
>>
Medical Genetics lab.
Working with placental DNA, examining Telomere length. The assay is a bitch to do.
>>
B Env Eng-> Ma Biochemical Eng ->phd work currently.
Working on new system designs and optimisations for utilisation of forestry and agricultural waste via several means. its been fun apart from sharing a lab with the guys playing with shit. that an my GC is old and keeps braking, due to shitty piping.
>>
>>6571742
can you measure moisture changes in real time in degradation of cysteine structures?
Would that even be possible?
>>
>>6582828
IDL, Matlab, Mathematica, etc - pretty much all the computational programming languages are the same. If you can program in one you can program in any of them. The only difference is the syntax
>>
>>6575680
FSU/NHFML
Was at a different university and national lab beforehand.
>>
>>6570918
That sounds awesome!
>>
>>6583089
I've been hearing a lot about the open-source language Sage lately, any good?
>>
BSc Psychology here, recently completed.

i've been building a roman room style statistical map of my country of residence, so by navigating this mental map I can see averages, graphs, distributions relating to all manner of demographics, from height, to cost of vehicles, employment status, net worth, health status, their spouses attributes.
>>
>>6583089
I don't see how you can claim MATLAB and mathematica the same.
>>
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>>6582749
Sth like that. Liquid drop model is used to describe the nucleus: besides near particle interactions it assumes surface tension-alike force. In hydrodynamics used to describe expansion of quark gluon plasma there are only: euler equation, continuity equation and energy conservation principle. Just in form of relativistic equations.

At the very first moment, two nuclei (in a form of thin disks - lorentz contratction, ya) are approaching each other at the speed of light. In the centre area of collision big amount of energy is unleashed. This amount is huge enough to tear protons and neutrons in nuclei into quarks, which are forming quite uniform soup.

This soup is behaving like a fluid. It expands quickly and during expansion, energy density decreases. In the places with the lowest energy density, quarks are recombining back into hadrons (mesons, barions, tetraquarks - confirmed few days ago) and travelling into particle detectors.

So how we know that is a fluid? In the experimental results, in spatial distributions of registered particles, we see some disturbances. Those disturbances can be explained by common movement of particles (a flow), when they were in a liquid phase as Quark Gluon Plasma.

I am the guy, who is improving the hydrodynamic model - I am performing simulations (based on this model) and comparing results with the experimental ones.

Clear enough?
>>
Qualitative investigation about breast feeding and information given by health services, so far we had done 12 interviews with very interesting results
>>
The past 3-4 weeks me and two other guys have been doing research for math. Forgive me I don't know what the tags for latex are but we are trying to prove if: G(x,t) is smooth and strictly positive on [0,1] \times [0,1] and F(\lambda) := \lambda\int_0^1e^{\int_0^tF(s,\lambda^{-1})ds} b(t) dt is bounded then b(t) is identically 0. Sorry can't do latex on 4chan and drunk lol
>>
>>6586148
I'm trying again. We're trying to bound
F(\lambda) := \lambda \int_0^1e^{\int_0^tF(s,\lambda^{-1})ds} b(t) dt
>>
>>6586155
actually no lol still drunk. Given that integral is bounded we need to prove b is 0 lol
>>
>>6586155
correction. the second F is the G(x,t)
>>
>>6586148
from what I've heard math research can be very hard and it it's rare not to get stuck
>>
>>6586685
Yeah but when that happens you just move onto another problem.
>>
>>6586763
what if my undergrad research only focuses on one problem?
>>
>>6587028
Shit out of luck then I guess
>>
>>6580057
Looks cool - what exactly does it do?
>>
Just uploaded first Science pub. How fast will the rejection come, bets/takers?
>>
>>6582655
What floor do you work on?
>>
>>6588395
What journal? What topic?
>>
>>6588554
> Science
> "What journal?"
What? "Science" is the name of the journal.

I have no idea how fast the review process for Science or Nature or other big "(kinda) pop" journals are. A friend of mine published in Nature, mostly because his PhD. advisor was famous enough, and it took a while but I don't know how long. Journals in my field are anywhere from 3 months to 6 months for the first response from the editor, and from 6 months to 2 years for the whole process assuming something like 2 decently small rounds of revisions plus the camera-ready update.
>>
>>6589465
>Journals in my field are anywhere from 3 months to 6 months for the first response from the editor, and from 6 months to 2 years for the whole process assuming something like 2 decently small rounds of revisions plus the camera-ready update.
Jesus Christ wtf? What fucking field is that? In my field (neuroscience) reviewers normally only get about a month to submit revisions, although often everybody procrastinates like hell so the average time to get a response back is about 1-2 months. Then you do your revisions which is about a month assuming you aren't forced to go back and run more experiments, then you resubmit and so on until you either get accepted, rejected, or give up. I've published 3 times and all of them took about 6 months from date of submission to acceptance.

I know a guy who considers anything below the top journal in the field beneath him, and his submissions do sometimes take years, but that's due to the sheer amount of revisions and extra experiments you have to go through to publish in something like Science or Nature.
>>
>>6589485
Anyway, my research currently investigates the role of the basal ganglia in habit formation, maintenance, and expression. I also do stuff on methamphetamine induced brain damage.

So basically I'm a drug dealer for rats. I weigh out their meth and train them to self-administer it (or just inject them myself depending on the goals of the experiment). The self-administration training is interesting actually. Some rats learn faster than others, and even with small groups you wind up with a rudimentary rat IQ curve where you can see who the genius and retarded rats are.

>>6571795
>>6572119
Funny story: The first project I ever worked on was a psych study investigating the cognitive effects of boredom. The experiment was intentionally designed to be mind-numbingly boring for the participants, and it went on for an hour for each person just to make sure we got them nice and bored. The shitty part was that I was the guy who had to run and monitor all the participants, meaning I had to sit there and watch them be bored. On the bright side, I got a LOT of studying done.

But here's the best part: It was funded by DARPA. They wanted to know in what ways guards' abilities are impaired after they've been on duty for 8 hours with absolutely nothing happening when suddenly bad guys.
>>
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Gearing up soon to try to get a position in the lab doing this research as an undergrad assistant. If it happens, I should eventually be able to bring some good content to these threads about laser plasma filamentation. Wish me luck, /sci/.

>>6589515
I wonder how DARPA would go about taking the boredom out of guard jobs. Hopefully with robots or lasers or some shit like that.
>>
>>6568708
>tfw senior undergrad with no research experience

I have one year left and I think I might just say fuck it to science and get my MBA
>>
>>6589561
you fucked up
>>
>>6589561
Do it. Research as a career is dead. Your chances of getting to be a funded tenure track professor are rapidly becoming the same as getting to be a famous actor. And if these MOOCs ever take off as a legitimate route for education, a professorship is going to become as realistic as becoming an astronaut.

I applied to MD/PhD programs last year and at my interviews every school would eventually ask this question: "Why are you trying to go into science?" And they weren't asking it in a "What are your motivations?" way but a "Are you crazy? Have you seen what the state of science is these days? Why on earth are you here?" way. I had one professor tell me that she told every PhD interviewee to quit now and find another career.

I ended up not getting into MD/PhD programs and while I'm having a bit of an identity/quarter life crisis right now because of it, I'm a bit relieved because now I don't feel so bad about leaving science to go pursue a new career in computer science.
>>
>>6589582
Are you serious? I'm the guy you replied to.

Just today I went on a tour of a researchers office and when he asked if I was planning to do research as a career he said very quickly "Don't do it" but then laughed and said he was kidding. It struck me as odd.

I have a business minor currently and have had internships with NASA in the past in business fields.

I guess another factor is whether or not I even like genetics and biology enough to pursue it. I mean, I like it and I like learning about it but I have always wondered if it's truly what I want to do. I've always felt some kind of "moral obligation" to do science since I know that I've always excelled in science classes and that I've always been very "scientific", even as a kid.

But I'm having a huge identity crisis as I prepare to graduate in a year. I don't know what to do about grad school because I don't know what I want to study. I haven't even begun to study for the GRE or GMAT because I don't know where I want to go. It really weighs down on me too and I feel like just giving up.
>>
>>6589604
>I guess another factor is whether or not I even like genetics and biology enough to pursue it. I mean, I like it and I like learning about it but I have always wondered if it's truly what I want to do. I've always felt some kind of "moral obligation" to do science since I know that I've always excelled in science classes and that I've always been very "scientific", even as a kid.
I've been the same way. I chose neuroscience as my major because I thought it was the most interesting major and that it would be a career that would allow me to easily make meaningful contributions to society. Admittedly another big motivation was that I have some psychiatric issues that currently don't even have treatments and I had it in my head that "I'm smart, I'm motivated, I'm interested in this, I guess I'll just have to fix myself if no one else will" (not an uncommon motivation for neuro and psych students as it turns out).

Even now that I'm pretty sure I want to leave science I still get the urge every now and then to just go ahead and apply to grad school. A lot of that is due to my current mentor keeps telling me I'm unlike any other scientist she's ever seen and that I'm doing the world a disservice by leaving science. But then I know a lot of students get that kind of speech and then wind up being eternal post-docs so fuck that. I find CS just as interesting, if not more interesting, than neuroscience, it's just as intellectually rewarding, and best of all it actually has JOBS. And those jobs actually pay you good money.
>>
>>6589582
research as a career is as strong as ever in my field (chemical engineering)
>>
>>6589696
Thank you for the thought out response. I will definitely have to think about this. It sucks that this is the way things are going for me. I wanted to go into an MBA program at a nearby uni that's pretty reputable but they scraped it to revamp it. I don't know when it will be available again so now I'm even more clueless.

Fuck. I wish I had never even tasted from the cup of science in the first place.

>>6589707
>>
>>6589707
The research may be "strong", but what most people are worried about is the ability to have a steady and decent-paying job. Academia is not a good bet for this anymore.

I'm in a physics PhD program (only b/c I got it fully funded), and with cocksuckers like NDT advertising for physics all the time, research is definitely "strong." There are tons of projects and lots of funding. HOWEVER, I plan on going directly into industry for optical networking b/c I can get an 80-120k salary immediately. Why? because academia is saturated. I work with 35 year old post-docs who work on 1 year contracts. They make $45,000 at best. They work 60 hr weeks and there's no end in sight. You could say that they're living the dream by traveling around the world and working with great minds, but the devil's in the details. They don't have a choice. If you don't have a serious connection you won't be tenure tracked until 40+. 2 years ago I would have said something autistic like "I just want to travel around the world researching. I'll do it for the love of science. I never want to stop learning and I don't want to "settle down" like all my friends who got bachelor's in engineering and went to work" or some shit. But now I'm 25, I have a long-term girlfriend who is making much more money than me and is talking about marriage, and it scares me to think about living some sort of semi-nomadic lifestyle doing post-docs around the country/world, regardless of how significant the work is. I've just met too many post-docs and "visiting researchers" who look like they are a real-life version of Christian Bale's character in The Machinist. Nothing makes you rethink you're career path like seeing post-docs with 1000 yard stares staying in the lab til 9 or 10pm, not because they're working but b/c they have nothing better to do and just sit on a lab stool listening to the hum of power-supplies and computers under dim fluorescent lights
>>
>>6589746
>Academia is not a good bet for this anymore

I am >>6589707
Yeah I wasn't talking about academia. PhDs in Chemical engineering are in very high demand and conduct research for a living. I feel bad for you physics and chemistry majors, you're the real scientists but nobody will ever hire you.

>Nothing makes you rethink you're career path like seeing post-docs with 1000 yard stares staying in the lab til 9 or 10pm, not because they're working but b/c they have nothing better to do and just sit on a lab stool listening to the hum of power-supplies and computers under dim fluorescent lights

Luckily I'm in a top 3 program so we all have those required "connections" you speak of. I'm a senior in undergrad right now, when I apply to grad school my advisor will call the guy at <insert other top school here> and let him know I'm coming because I've impressed him or something.
>>
>>6568708
Audiovisual temporal perception and cognition
>>
>>6572328
*cringe*
>>
>>6572786
lol their research is clearly on hydraulic fracturing for the purpose of petroleum extraction.
>>
>>6589557
>Christodoulides
lol
>>
>>6589770
Meaning?
>>
I'm implementing an approximation method to calculate quantum correlation functions. Is a neat problem really.
>>
So at this point it looks like we're going to set our filamental quenching study on the backburner. We'll still work on collecting more data when we have the time but it looks like we're going to be shifting priorities to a building a new chamber.

My prof is one of the co-investigators on the new MDPX apparatus down at Auburn and I'll actually be going there myself in the Fall. We have an identical version of the vacuum chamber and the plasma source as the new apparatus (minus the scary big superconducting magnet) and we're going to work on getting it up and running and workign on a few non-magnetized dusty plasma experiments before I the Summer ends.

If we start work on it this week I'll take some snapshots (and I could take some pics of the other machines if you guys are interested)
>>
I was going to post something about mine, then I saw the thread is over 200 replies long, I hate long threads.
>>
>>6593404
Long threads are the best threads - tell us about your research
>>
>>6568708

I'm a mathematician. I can't into science because I actually prove things. Have fun with your shitty inductive logic.

>deductive master race reporting in
>>
>>6593478
>what is theory?
>>
>>6593493
A miserable little pile of equations.
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