[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / bant / biz / c / can / cgl / ck / cm / co / cock / d / diy / e / fa / fap / fit / fitlit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mlpol / mo / mtv / mu / n / news / o / out / outsoc / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / spa / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vint / vip / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y ] [Search | Extra juicy! | Home]

Why did the development of mathematics pretty much stagnate after

This is a blue board which means that it's for everybody (Safe For Work content only). If you see any adult content, please report it.

Thread replies: 67
Thread images: 12

Why did the development of mathematics pretty much stagnate after the Greeks until the Renaissance?
>>
Literally because of christianity.
>>
Christian dark ages
>>
>>290951


Math tends to develop when applications requiring more advanced math crop up.

Greek and Roman math had already licked a lot of the problems of the day, mostly involving astronomy and building construction, and there wasn't much of a call for anything more sophisticated until the Renaissance, when the development of telescopes allowed for better astronomical observations, which in turn led to a need for better astronomical models to explain the observations, which in turn meant a need for more advanced mathematical techniques.
>>
It continued developing with the Arabs/Persians and then in the 12th and 13th century with Western Europe
>>
File: Le Vinci.jpg (30KB, 570x116px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Le Vinci.jpg
30KB, 570x116px
you actually have that backwards my friend
>>
>>290979
da Vinci is the most overrated "genius" of all times
>>
File: math timeline.png (605KB, 1243x454px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
math timeline.png
605KB, 1243x454px
>>
>>290994
Does anyone have a version of that pic large enough to be readable without getting instant myopy?
>>
Were the Oxford Calculators medieval or Renaissance men?
>>
>until the Renaissance
Full retard.

Mathematics took off again during the Gothic, especially in the 14th century at Paris and Oxford. Then it stopped completely during the Renaissance, and most of the Gothic progress was even forgotten. It only started again in the 17th century with Enlightenment.

The Renaissance was a dark age for science and mathematics.
>>
>>291012
medieval
>>
>>291020
So why did it died until the Enlightenment?
>>
>>291027
Neoclassicism, or 'The Greeks can do no wrong, stop asking'
>>
>>291027
You mean between Gothic and Enlightenment, during the Renaissance? Because academia became dominated by Humanism, which rejected all medieval progress as a product of the "dark ages", and only accepted ancient Greek and Roman works.
>>
>>290994
Always wondered why most of these pictures and history of mathematics in general totally omit Egyptian mathematics

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Egyptian_mathematics

What I understand, even the geometry and mathematics used in building huge monolithic structures like Pyramids were pretty much unknown even to the Greeks.
>>
>>290969
kinda strange given the massive advances in construction that happened during the medieval era
>>
>>291020
>Who are Fibonacci, Tartaglia and Cardano
In your meme countries maybe
>>
>>291050
>Fibonacci
Not Renaissance
>>
>>291046

Yeah, but the geometry of the day, while borrowed mostly from the Greeks and Romans, was pretty good for that. An arch is an arch is an arch, even if you make it a flying buttress, the underlying calculations and the methods used to reach them are the same.


IIRC (And I'm hardly an expert on either Roman or medieval/renaissance architecture) the biggest change was the invention of scaffolding, which made it far easier to build up.
>>
>>290994
>Liebniz
>>
>>291053
>Mathematics took off again during the gothic at Paris and Oxford
>>
>>291050
Three pretty irrelevant names in the history of mathematics, and Fibonacci was born in the 12th century.
>>
>>291078
Sorry Luigi, Italy is really good at bounless arrogance and shit-talking, but not much else.
>>
>>291078
>especially
>>
>>291080
>>291091
>>291092

>being this buttblasted
I thought this was an humanities board
>>
>>291078
Who are Jean Buridan, Nicolas Oresme, and the Merton Calculators?
>>
>>291134
meme country mathematicians?
>>
>>291160
>calling France and England meme countries while being unironically Italian
kekkest of tops
>>
>>291173
anally devastated frog detected

sorry pal, you can only beat us in baguette production
>>
>>291187
Well the French certainly could never beat you at covering their streets in trash, failing at every fucking war they fight in, and having a terribly shit economy.
>>
>>290951
>le dark ages maymay

Epic
>>
File: 1429017045280.jpg (20KB, 200x200px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1429017045280.jpg
20KB, 200x200px
>>291203
>>
>>291203
Lel
>>
It didn't? There were lots of Algebraic and Geometric advancements in that time.
>>
>>290951
Ohhhhh boy here we go.

It didn't stagnate, complex mathematics were still being studied in Persia, gah, why does everyone still keep saying this?
>>
>>291203
meme opinions for a meme country
fitting
>>
>>291246

There is a consistent belief that Egypt invented everything, the Greeks borrowed from them and spread the knowledge to Europe.

It seems to correlate with the advancement of Egyptology.
>>
>>291266
>meme
But hey, at least you have your fucking awful driving tradition to be proud of. It takes real skill to make the streets of Russia look safe and well organised in comparison.

Not even Baguette. I just find it laughable how some fuckwit from some irrelevant shithole that may as well be bought out in the next 50 years by the 4th reich tries to elevate the shithole he lives in to the level of an actual country.
>>
>>291281
That's not entirely off base tho.

I wouldn't say Greek architecture is outright lifted from Egypt, that's silly, but if I recall correctly there's a rather tenable theory that (roughly speaking) early Greeks saw a bit of Egypt and got inspired. Started with copying some architectural techniques (and sculptural) then the Greeks branched off into their own thing.
>>
File: Oresme.jpg (106KB, 709x688px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Oresme.jpg
106KB, 709x688px
>>291020
This.

The most important name is definitely Oresme. He worked in the 14th century, and among many other things he invented the mathematical funtion and its graphical representation, and applied it to solve physics problems, discovering the mean speed theorem in the process. In doing this he invented calculus and founded Western Mathematics, as well as a cornerstone of the scientific method.

No other mathematician comes anywhere close until Descartes.
>>
>>291346
>not even baguette
>gets this mad even if it's clear bait
>posts naples as an example of anything
Enjoy getting keked into oblivion
>>
>>291398
You're the only one who seems mad here, Luigi.
>>
>>291347
The thing is, it wasn't asymmetrical, the Mediterranean civilization gave to Egypt more than was given back.

Around the time of the Bronze Dark Age, Mediterranean civilization disappeared, events such as the Sanotrini Volcano and disappearance of the Minoans gave the Greeks a kind of Amnesia.

> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santorini#Dating_of_the_Bronze_Age_eruption

The Greeks were in contact with Egypt from a very early time, there is evidence of Greek traders at Naucratis from the Minoan period.

> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naucratis#Archaeological

It was later on that Greeks got the idea that Egypt spawned their civilization, when in fact the Greeks were a part of a wider Mediterranean civilization that encompassed Egypt as well as Greece.
>>
>>291404
Sure, sure mate ;^)
Is it halal to write this late at night?
>>
>>291420
God you even suck at banter, is there even a single thing Italians are competent at?
>>
File: Mio2.jpg (47KB, 446x504px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Mio2.jpg
47KB, 446x504px
>>291354

> In doing this he invented calculus

What is Leibniz?
>>
>>291515
Leibniz lived 350 years later m8...
>>
>>291515
Oresme started it all. Leibniz just got on the bandwagon and developed it
>>
>>291027
The greeks did nothing wrong.
Fuck you middle ages
>>
>>291126
History is one of the humanities
>>
>>291530
>>291549

Oresme didn't invent calculus. You'll never find a credible source to support that.

Meanwhile, in the real world, everyone acknowledges that Leibniz invented calculus in the notation we currently use (some will claim Newton did it first but that notation isn't the predominant style).
>>
>>291565
The problem during most of the Middle Ages was that they had such a huge respect for the Greeks that they never dared to question them and never moved beyond their work.

All that changed after 1277, and for a short century there was the beginning of a scientific revolution, but then the Renaissance came and everyone went back to worshiping the Greeks.
>>
>>291587
It wasn't even really a problem in the middle ages considering it still worked in regards to architecture
>>
>>291580
>they say so on wikipedia

Oresme invented the mathematical function. That is the foundation of calculus and it's absolutely revolutionary. The fact that this (like all medieval achievements) has historically been ignored doesn't mean it didn't happen.
>>
File: quran surah.jpg (47KB, 750x739px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
quran surah.jpg
47KB, 750x739px
>>291580
>Meanwhile, in the real world
You lost all your credibility when you resorted to cheap rhetoric instead of disproving the argument, lad
>>
>>291587
>they never dared to question them and never moved beyond their work.
they did question them, there just wasnt any reason to believe otherwise.
>>
File: le_greek_logic_man.jpg (114KB, 765x1024px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
le_greek_logic_man.jpg
114KB, 765x1024px
>>290961
Even the pagan romans never produced talented mathematicians. They focused in more applied knowledge.

>>291045
But the greeks where the first to apply the deductive method to mathematics. Mesopotamian\Egyptian math was used as a tool while the focus for greek mathematicians where on proofs.

>>290994
> no Cantor
> no Hilbert
>>
File: Math progressing.png (4KB, 363x323px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Math progressing.png
4KB, 363x323px
>>290951

Because the Greeks pushed synthetic euclidean geometry to it's fucking limits.

Viete followed by Fermat (and Descartes but he sucked) opened the door to symbolic algebra. After that modern mathematics and science snowballed.
>>
>>290957
>>290961
>How to troll /his/
>>
>>290994
>Hypotia on here for literally no reason.
She is the worst waifu.
>>
>>291061
Well friend if you're not an expert on Roman or medieval architecture then why are you talking about it.

The advances in construction that happened during the Gothic era were not Greek and Roman at all, even in their calculations. The "broken arch" was a movement away from the classical, as was the rejection of their standards of perfect symmetry. Flying buttresses were considered a new invention because of the ability to distribute the weight from the broken arches and create walls that were made mostly of glass (something unseen again until the discovery of steel) for aesthetic reasons. To say that underlying mathematical calculations and methods are the same when discussing a "modern" innovation is like saying a car was really a Mesopotamian design because they came up with the wheel.
>>
File: medieval monk.jpg (70KB, 1251x585px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
medieval monk.jpg
70KB, 1251x585px
>>290957
>Literally because of christianity.
>>
>>293560
They banned the number zero. Just stop and think how retarded that is.
>>
>>293971
What? Gerbert d'Aurillac introduced that concept to the West and then he became fucking Pope.
>>
>>293971
>The myth that the Catholic Church tried to ban the use of the number zero has grown more popular in recent years. The journalist Charles Seife managed to write an entire book (Zero: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea) about how zero was banned without ever realising his central argument has no foundation in fact. The same myth was passed on in Peter Atkins' Galileo's Finger and Felipe Fernandez-Armesto’s 1492. It is true that, when Arabic numbers were first introduced into the West, there was no agreement over which numeral should refer to which number. To this day, our zero means five in the Middle East. As a result of this potential for confusion, Arabic numerals were banned from some official documents. This might be the origin of the legend that the Church tried to forbid zero." http://www.strangenotions.com/debunking-the-mythical-conflict/
>>
>>290979
>Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1591)
what the fuck
Thread posts: 67
Thread images: 12


[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / bant / biz / c / can / cgl / ck / cm / co / cock / d / diy / e / fa / fap / fit / fitlit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mlpol / mo / mtv / mu / n / news / o / out / outsoc / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / spa / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vint / vip / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Top | Home]
Please support this website by donating Bitcoins to 16mKtbZiwW52BLkibtCr8jUg2KVUMTxVQ5
If a post contains copyrighted or illegal content, please click on that post's [Report] button and fill out a post removal request
All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.
This is a 4chan archive - all of the content originated from that site. This means that 4Archive shows an archive of their content. If you need information for a Poster - contact them.