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Who /silkscreen/ here?

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Who /silkscreen/ here?
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Sorry about the terrible pics. I'm not a photographer, but I've got a little empire going in my kitchen if anybody wants tips or tricks to do this efficiently and economically as a fun a profitable hobby.
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>>900378
I'm a relief printer.
I tried screen printing with disastrous results this summer.
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Does not take a whole lot to get started, and you can make art prints, stickers, t-shirts, and practically anything else flat, hundreds of copies in the course of an honest day's work.
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>>900380
It does take a little practice, and it's totally different from any process using an actual press, but the portability and versatility are a nice tradeoff once you know what you're doing.
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I've even managed to do a couple of album covers and sweet CD-R tops.
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>>900385
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Been playing with high-detail stuff lately, business cards, fine text, etc. With the right mesh and the right emulsion coating methods, you can get a little better than 72dpi. The finest text on this has lines about 1/300" wide, and they're not perfect, but mostly readable.
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Also a nice compliment to simple woodwork for mass producing folk primitives.
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Bumper Stickers!
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>>900379
I'm listening :) where / how to start? Initial costs? Minimum requirements? Recommended book maybe?
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>>900393
Print Liberation: The Screen Printing Primer by Nick Paparone & Jamie Dillon is on my shelf. I initially learned from The Art Of Silk Screen, which is very out of date and probably out of print now, but it's fun for the history.

You can get a starter kit at a craft store for about $80-$100 US depending on what method you start with. I'd recommend Speedball kits to get started, but eventually you'll wanna upgrade to better everything.

You will need a big sink or bathtub with running water and a large flat surface aside from a kit. A good light source or two helps.

If you really wanna go diy with it, it's not too hard to build and mesh frames or cut squeegees from raw materials. Frames can be made of wood, aluminum, or polymer. Pretty much anything straight that you can stretch fabric across. The squeegee you need is essentially a length of rubber belt stapled between two pieces of wood. There are also recipes for all the necessary chemicals floating around, and they're pretty simple to make if you don't feel like buying them, other than photo sensitizer.
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>>900397
Also if you get into fabric prints with plastisol ink you'll want an iron or heat press.
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>>900398
Probably the simplest and cheapest useful method is the block-out method. You paint a design directly on the screen with a soapy, syrupy, water-soluble substance, usually sold as screen drawing fluid. You can also use solid soap to get charcoal or chalk-like effects. Fel's naptha laundry bar soap works best for this. Once the design is dry, you spread a grease-like chemical called blockout or screen filler over it. The drawing fluid/soap repels this stuff, and it dries into an ink-blocking film over the rest of the screen. Then you rinse it out with water.
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>>900400
The more commonly used and versatile method of stencil making is the photo method. In this case, you spread a thin layer of photo-sensitive emulsion across the whole screen, then expose the parts you want blocked out to light. The best way to do this is to print or draw a design in black on a sheet of transparent acetate, lay it on the screen and weigh it down with a (non-UV blocking) glass pane, and expose it to a really powerful source of light, such as a halogen lamp or a bed of full-spectrum fluorescent tubes. I use a projector, with an .avi file that fills the whole screen with white for the duration of the exposure time I need (usually 7 minutes. This will vary.), then about five minutes of black to give me time to remove the screen. You then wash it out in a darkroom. The photoemulsion that hasn't been exposed to light will be very water soluble, and that which has been exposed will be only slightly so.
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>>900404
Other methods involve cutting stencils out of card stock or thin plastic or other sturdy film and sticking it directly to the screen, or directly drawing a design in negative with some material such as blockout.

Once you have a stencil, you spread a bead of ink across the bottom of it, lay the screen down on whatever surface you wanna print on, flush the stencil with ink by tilting the squeegee handle away from the ink and pushing it across the screen, then stroke the actual print by pulling the squeegee angled into the bead of ink back across the screen. Let it dry and you're done! Repeat a million times and get rich.
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>>900408
You do multi-color prints by separating the design out into separate stencils by color, and setting your work surface up so each piece will be in exactly the same position with respect to the screen when you print. I do this by attaching my screens to a slab of MDF with a pair of clamps mounted on hinges. They sell a few different brands of these in art supply catalogs, and I've seen home-made versions around. For each color (known as a run), I print an initial proof on newsprint that I've taped down to the MDF, then tape some wax paper over that and mark one corner of the proof with two large stacks of masking tape. If each of my stock pieces is exactly the same size as the newsprint, they will stop against the masking tape and print from the exact same distance from each edge. This is called registration. If you don't do it, each of your colors will be slid around and you'll get a stuttery, blurry image.
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>>900383
You've inspired me to give it another go.
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>>900421
I made my first attempt about 12 years ago, and it was terrible. Over the years I tried again intermittently, making different mistakes, cutting all the wrong corners, trying to innovate where just learning would've been easier. Once I decided to really commit, get and build the right gear the right way, and allow myself some actual textbook practice, I got good in about a week.

I firmly believe this is something anyone could do and everyone with a desire to publish or produce anything printable SHOULD do.
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A fun historical method I'd like to try one day, which requires natural silk mesh, is to use oil-based and water-based paints/coatings to make the stencil, and do wash-out with the same solvent you'd use for your ink. For example, to do a print with a water-based ink, you paint the design on the screen with tempera paint, then cover it with urethane varnish and wash out with water. On the other hand, to do a print with oil-based ink, you paint the design in oil paint, coat with elmer's glue, and wash it out with kerosene.

These methods would really simplify reclamation of the screen. The modern methods I described above require relatively specialized chemicals, but are safer on synthetic mesh.

To reclaim a screen with a block-out stencil (as in to remove the stencil to make a new one), you use degreaser (Simple Green works best for me), a synthetic scrub brush, and 4-6 hours of elbow grease. Photoemulsion usually comes with its own remover, and there are a few alternatives with various tradeoffs, but reclaiming is scary, because the remover leaves the emulsion in a state where it will chemically bond to the mesh if it dries, meaning you need to get it perfectly clean in one go without stopping or you've destroyed your mesh.

An alternative is to use a pressure wash. Some people use a self-serve carwash. I have a pressure gun that attaches to an ordinary garden hose and doesn't require a compressor. No idea how it works, but it does, at least to the point that I can get the most stubborn burnt-on emulsion out of a mesh in about 4-6 hours. Usually as long as I protect my screens from light I can reclaim them this way in 10-15 minutes.
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>>900389
alright faggot, details on the stickers.
Are you using a solvent like paint on vinyl or what?
or just reg ink on stickers
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>>900457

>calls poster a faggot, expects information

get a load of this fuckin guy
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>>900457
I'm using a mix of plastisol ink and acrylic paint on vinyl. It's about the thickness of ketchup.
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>>900460

you just became that guys bitch. he called you a faggot and you answered him anyways.

you disappoint me
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>>900461
Pretty sure this is an art class and not one of those parades where guys see who can get the most other guys piss on one another's legs, so I'm not really particularly giving a fuck.
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>>900463

you fucking kek. enjoy being a pussy all your life
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>>900465
Oh, you're a shit poster. Thought you were actually concerned. Thanks for the bumps anyway.
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>>900466

bump my nuts on your chin motherfucker
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>>900474
Did the bigger girls beat you up at recess today?
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>>900474
So alpha, he don't take no shit from no anon on a makaneese lithography board
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>>900459
>>900457
>>900461
>>900465
>>900474
This looks samefag. I can tell from the capitalisation, and from seeing quite a few fags in my time.
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>I have a question.
This a stencil used for electrochemical etching. Does it look like silkscreen? it has a texture of vinyl.
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>>900547
It's definitely a mesh, and the color is exactly right for burned in photoemulsion, and silk screens are commonly used in the electronics industry, so I'd say yeah.
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>>900548
Interesting. We currently get absolutely screwed on the price of them at work. I might start a side business making them and sell them back to work.
>Thanks
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>>900550
If that text is the size of what you normally see on a PCB, I would assume that mesh has a threadcount of 305. It runs about $30 a yard retail.

You could make a practically infinite amount that size on an 8oz jar of photoemulsion if you keep the coats thin, which is also necessary for fine detail anyway.

Bout the only other thing you'd need to get started doing this is a laser printer and a ream of acetate. You can do an exposure of this quality in the sun in about 5-10 minutes and wash it out in a bathroom sink if there's no frame involved.

Those being used to print etch resist onto metal coated boards or what?
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Used to silkscreen for 9 years and I hate that shit. When I set up my business, I made sure to adopt all the best solvent and UV printing machinery i could get my sweaty hands on. Silkscreening stickers sucks ass.

Of course, apart from sublimation, there's not much one can do with ready-made clothes etc. Printing shirts was much more fun anyways.

You can do a lot with printed heat-press flock materials, btw.
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>>900576
Then start a thread on it.

I think the point of silkscreen these days is it's a process available to people for whom a warehouse full of industrial machinery, or even a simple offset press, isn't feasible.
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how do you wash the plastisol remains from the mesh after printing? we have already tried nasty chemicals, still we could barely get the screen clean ... and nasty headache from the vapors.

no problems with water based inks.
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>>900582
First of all, when you're working with plastisol or acrylic, you have to work fast and be sure it doesn't dry on the screen. They will permanently bond, and the only solvent for dried acrylic is acetone, which will eat right through a synthetic screen. I'm not sure if there is a designated solvent for plastisol, but as long as it hasn't been exposed to heat, it will stay somewhat water soluble it's whole life. You probably want to blow it out with a pressure wash.

Now also, be aware that dyes and pigments in all inks can stain the fabric, and if this is the case and it's not actually obstructing the mesh, just don't worry about it. We call those stains good memories of jobs gone by.
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>>900585
Also in the future, slow your plastisol down with a retarder base. That'll leave you a little more open time between each print and between printing and cleaning, but your prints will also have to sit around longer before heat setting, die cutting, or whatever other operation you need to do on them.
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>>900586
yeah, that might help ...

also for a bitchy glossy effect overprint your white motive with black.
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and i like to keep transparent found footage for assembling designs directly on the exposure table underneath the screen.
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>>900587
Nice.
>>900586
Speaking of, does anybody have any experience with die cutting? I'd really like to get into it, but the only supplies and equipment I can find are either very large and expensive industrial gear requiring a professional caster for custom jobs, or dinky papercraft/scrapbooking stuff that is only prefab shapes and overcomplicated. I'd like to figure out a simple diy solution, thinking about something involving fine wires, a woodblock, and a mallet or block printing press.
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>>900589
That's some neat stuff. I've been getting into local music flyers lately, often promoting the same group of bands, and I've thought hard about chopping up my transparencies to save the logos and venue info to do something similar.
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when doing textile multicolor: whats your technique to fit the color layers?

mine: have registrationmark on the screen, print it with the first color on a piece of tape on the shirt, cover the same registration mark on the screen of the second color with some scotchtape and use it to fir the frame.
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>>900389
at first at thought it's a brand of skateboards targeted at goths.

thanks, now I know that there is such a thing as croatian darkwave.
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>>900787
The setup I have right now, I can only do multicolor on fairly firm, rectangular stock. I do a proof on newsprint taped down to my work surface using a hingeclamped screen, then tape translucent wax paper down on top of that to protect the bottoms of the actual prints, and use two thick stacks of masking tape as a registration stop on one corner of the proof.

For the subsequent runs, I do the same thing, not worrying too much about where the stencil is set on the screen. Before the first print in a run, I can see through the screen well enough to line the proof back up and eyeball.

Long as I don't make a mistake and nothing comes loose that shouldn't, it works fairly well, and the registration will stay within a couple of mm.
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>>900801
Yeah, that's our local scene bulletin board. There are a few second generation Croatian immigrants involved.
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>>900787
Forgot to add, best way to do multicolor shirts is with a carousel. I've never bothered upgrading to one because they're huge and cost as much as a car, but lately I've seen tabletop models for under $500 that I'm thinking hard about.
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>>900852
>at work
>buddy says his car is in the shop, needs a ride.
>sure.
>oh hay, thanks for dropping me off. Could you help me open this broken garage door and move this carousel in
Fuckin a Ronnie.
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>>900787
carousel
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OP here, trying something outrageous and probably impossible today: a silkscreen pinhole camera.
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>>901387
According to my calculations, the exposure time in full sun accounting for the reflectance of my subject should be about 4-6 hours, so I started it as soon as the sun came up.

The camera is made of cardboard from a sketchbook backing and sealed with black vinyl I had left over from some sticker prints.
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>>901391
Oh yeah, this thing shoots in stereo. My intention is to print Victorian-style look-thru stereograms on cellophane and mount them in cardstock frames. The apertures are about 0.3mm. Not expecting anything resembling sharp focus, but anything smaller and I'd be doing a multi-day exposure.
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>>901393
My test subject, from about four inches to the left of the actual camera at the same elevation. The "film" is a ribbon of 305TPI monofilament synthetic mesh coated in diazo emulsion.
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>>901387
I don't see why it wouldn't work, given long enough exposure.
Why all your pics look like vomit?
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>>901396
Because I'm a terrible photographer with a terrible camera, and I just built an even worse camera that'll take even worse pictures.
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>>901396
Diazo on mesh really works best with an all-or-nothing light supply. How much of the gray in the original ends up either solid black or white depends on how hard you wash it out. People have used cameras to burn in silkscreens before, but usually with a moire somewhere between the subject and the screen to split the gray up into halftone dots, and usually instead of directly shooting the subject they run it through a high-powered projector, and the burn time is about 10-20 minutes at worst.

I've never done a pinhole camera before, so I have no faith in them, and I've never tried to capture reflected light on a silkscreen before, so I have no faith in that either, but I really wanted to try it.
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>>901398
I've built two pinhole cameras for sheet film, which was also pretty on-off. While the results certainly weren't great, they were good enough to say the camera worked. People have also managed to take pinhole photos on cyanotype paper and on even shittier materials, so silkscreen doesn't sound that bad in comparison.
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>>901409
This is totally unrelated, but I've been thinking about doing like a 3-month exposure on black construction paper as well.
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>>900851

Keep it alive man. My local scene board died, granted most of the people were elitist jerks. But hey thats hardcore for ya.
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>>901422
Started mine late in the game. Stiff competition from facebook. I try to keep good periodic content and obviously advertise the fuck out of it. The kids did ask for it.
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>>901427
OP here, still alive. It's been perfectly clear and sunny all day, and I'm gonna pull this guy and attempt washout in about half an hour. Wish me luck.
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>>901515
Nah, nothing to show really. The sky burned in a little, but it's practically impossible to make any details out. Gonna try a 9-hour exposure tomorrow.
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>>900460
do you seal them afterwards or something?
How are they for flaking ?

Ive been trying stuff with acrylic and acetone . plastison and acyrlic is interesting

>>900459
terms of inderment
>>900504
you look samefag i post actual relevent to the thread
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>>901790
The blend is pretty solid. Doesn't flake or separate, and adheres really well to every surface I've tried it on. If I don't heat set they will get a little sticky with enough pressure, but mainly only to other ink, and not really enough to cause issues. Nobody would ever notice unless they had a stack of front-and-back prints lying around for weeks unmoved.

You're thinning acrylic with acetone for screen printing? That's gotta be rough on your mesh, and about the only advantage I'd see with it is faster drying time than water, which is also rough on mesh. I'd use water or glycerine for more open time, less permanent bonding to a reusable mesh, and no chemical damage to the mesh.
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>>901798
nah i havent dont anything on screen yet, im trying to find a non flake combo that i can use on other things like metal as well as other plastics
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>>901829
Oh that's a whole other animal. If you don't mind the drying time, I've had luck on metal with urethanes/enamels, and in theory this seems like it should be a bad idea, but I've used enamel as an undercoat for acrylic foregrounds on metal, and two years later it's still pretty solid.

Definitely stay away from acetone or any other strong solvent with silk screen. Natural silk can handle it to some extent, but most meshes are synthetic now and really vulnerable to solvents, especially acetone.
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>>901829
>>901837
And if you're willing to experiment, plastisol should work pretty well on any non-porous surface that can handle the heat necessary to set it.

Jaquard silkscreen inks are an interesting line. They're advertised as all-purpose and supposedly bond to metals and most plastics pretty well. I have no idea what the binder composition is, but judging by the instructions I would guess it's got some percentage of plastisol along with some other binders, and some kind of heavy body retarder base. They've got a great thickness, clean up easy, and are more durable than any other ink I've tried. They require less heat/time than pure plastisol, but you do still want to give them a gentle ironing on any soft ground.
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>>900397
>Print Liberation: The Screen Printing Primer
Did you like this book? It always just looked like one of those colorful but vague guides, I remember when they hyped it up a few years back with a build it yourself tabletop press they were selling.
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>>902008
Not OP but I got this book too. I'd agree this book is more of a basic primer for beginners than an actual instructional or technical book. More to hype the reader to get out there and do it.
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An other question:
How long does silkscreen ink last on wool etc.?
I maybe want to start silkscreening black t shirts for me, my family and some friends but it wont be that awesome, if the motive wont last a single wash. Does someone here got some (long time) experience?
Thanks a lot!
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>>902102
Depends on the ink you use. Acrylic or heatset plastisol will last decades on just about any fabric.
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>>902227
Allright, thanks a lot!
I think I will give it a try
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OP here, got an actual paid job this week. Turns out there's a niche for short turnover, short run jobs that the big guys can't handle. Will get back to that camera experiment when I've got a sec.
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OP again, I had a little spare time today and re-coated the strip for another try with the camera. Next time I'm getting any sun is the day after tomorrow, and I'm gonna try a 2-3 day exposure this time.

On another note, related to silkscreen, I wrote a plug-in for Gimp to do pretty decent halftones from an RGB image. Runs a little slow and isn't totally idiot-proof for distribution yet, but it's gonna save me a lot of time from now on.
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Hey I'm getting into this for the first time. Got a real shitty second hand machine but I'm looking for some liquid emulsion. Anyone know of any places i can get it for cheap?
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>>904076
Craft store, dick blick, amazon. Don't forget to get a compatible sensitizer if you just get a bucket of emulsion instead of a small bottle kit.

By "second hand machine" you mean a carousel? A screen and squeegee aren't exactly a machine, unless you wanna argue third-class levers or something.
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>>904153
thanks man
and it's a second hand because it's a really shit "Yudu" machine. Everywhere I look people say it's shit and overpriced on every aspect. But my grandma got it from a friend years ago and hadn't used it since. Usually I'd say fuck it, but a free machine is a free machine
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>>904172
Oh yeah I've seen those things. Never got the point of them. The process really requires such a simple build of equipment pretty much anybody with a handsaw and a staple gun can make one, other than the carousel necessary to keep stuff like multicolor shirts on registration.

Should do the trick anyway, especially if you didn't pay for it. If it ever dies I don't recommend buying another one.

Now if you or anybody does end up buying frames, the Speedball frames are actually pretty cool. They hold the mesh in with a length of thick plastic-dipped twine that sticks in a groove carved around the bottom of the frame. Easy to change and stretch mesh, would be a little more complicated to make at home than a staple-on frame. The size selection is a little shitty though.
>>
Protip about photoemulsion. The big shops I have friends working for just slop it onto their screens with a scoop coater and put it in a drying rack. This takes about 30 seconds and really saves them on labor, but if you're doing this in your kitchen or something, putting a little extra time and work in will really help.

I apply emulsion with a scoop coater, sometimes a couple of coats or a front-and-back coat, whatever will give the best coverage, then I go back in with an old credit card and scrape the coats totally flat, front and back. I go vertically on one side, flip it and go vertically on the other side, flip it and go horizontally on the first side, flip it again, horizontal, repeat until the coat is perfectly even and as flat to the mesh as possible, and put all the emulsion I scraped off back into the jar.

This will save you a fuck ton of money in the long run, and you'll get more detail out of your burn-in, shorter wash-out, and an easier time reclaiming.
>>
>>904028
You do know about scriptographer, right? That's what I used to use for stuff like that.

Unfortunately, when Adobe changed their API some time back, it wasn't continued because it would have required a total rewrite.

I assume you're not interested to write a plugin for Illustrator or photoshop, are you?

In either case, check out scriptographer, you might find some inspiration for features.

Also, as soon as you distribute what you have now, I'd love a github link.

Here's the scriptographer homepage:

http://scriptographer.org/
The news detail their reasoning for abandoning the project.

Here's a raster that worked well for halftones:

http://scriptographer.org/scripts/raster-scripts/object-raster/
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>>904312
Appreciate it. Just trying to keep my software setup as simple and free as possible, which is why I don't even mess with adobe. I hardly even mess with vector graphics unless a client needs it, and I'm not exactly overwhelmed with clients.

99% of my design work is either on paper or in Gimp, and that workflow has served me well over the years.
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>>904312
>Just trying to keep my software setup as simple and free as possible
Yeah, I can understand that, I'm no different. Unfortunately, I just can't get around Photoshop/Lightroom/Illustrator for all the things I do, and believe me, I tried again and again. It's literally the only thing keeping me on Windows.
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>>904334
Yeah, I'd do it if I had to, but the way I run things right now, when a need comes up I can generally spend a couple of days typing code and have new functionality that works, does exactly what I want with no bloat, and I don't have to spend the same amount of time learning how to use it right or steal or pay for it.
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>>900379
Op is assbackwards. I screen print at a screen printing factory and all of ops methods are shit
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>>904339
Do correct then.
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>>904339
>>904341
Also explain how exactly the customers I do have are happier with the quality of my work than with the big shops they've dealt with, how I can undercut every shop in town, and how my turnover is about a quarter the time for small jobs.
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>>904348
That said, I've learned everything I know from a couple of books, instructions that come with my supplies, and lots of trial and error. I'd prefer to be learning from this thread myself.

My whole shop, not counting shit I own anyway and use as household appliances, cost under a grand, and whatever methods I've vaguely described ITT are purely aimed at other kitchen hobbyists.

I don't advertise, have no employees, and had no reputation or references until I started putting my work all over town. I don't accept any job that would take me more than one session to finish. Explain how I have customers at all. I make enough from this to make it pay for itself and not have to bother with a full-time job.
>>
Any experience with printing over thick seams?
A colleague of mine said he built a frame with a foam plastic plate to equalize the difference in thickness.
>>
>>904957
Sounds like a neat idea. Never really thought about it, just either avoid the seams or just print over them and let the gaps/distortions happen.

I have printed CD tops, which is kind of a similar problem. The proper way to do it is probably with a routed jig that keeps the whole surface you're printing on as close to flat and level as possible. I just print right over them lying on a flat surface. Worst case, the squeegee catches on it and moves it around, but I've never had it happen. Might have to try a foam lip around the bottom of a frame and see if that tightens up the print on irregular surfaces though.
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OP here, this T-shirt job kept me occupied for a bit, but finally done. Got the pinhole camera set back up, gonna let it run for a couple of days this time. Will report back if I get any showable results.
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>>906856
Posted too early, my question was already answered. So, my new question is: Where should I look with a budget of $1-2k? I don't want to get screwed over by inflated prices on home equipment. I'm also willing to make the dyes and other materials myself, depending on the difficulty vs cost of these. Basically, where should I focus the bulk of my funds?
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>>900582
I worked in a printer shop for a while - we used a solvent to soften it a bit, and then hit it with a pressure washer to blast it away
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>>906867
Starting from scratch? I'd put most of it into a tabletop carousel if you wanna go into multi-color prints. You can get cheap as hell aluminum frames. I'd get four standard T-shirt sized ones (if that's what you're wanting to focus on) and some over- and under-sized ones for weird jobs.

A good light bed would be the next thing to look at. You can improvise or build your own here, but life will be a lot easier if you have powerful, rated, standard gear.

Any big chunk of cash left over I'd look into washout sinks and drying cabinets. Inks, stencil chemicals, squeegees, and mesh are all pretty cheap and replaceable. A laser printer will really help.

As far as big investments go, that's about all I can think of that I'd consider essential. A pressure wash and decent-sized compressor you can use indoors would be a nice thing to have.

About the only chemicals that would be worth looking into making yourself would be drawing fluid/screen filler if you wanna get into that method. Everything else would cost at least as much to make from scratch.

Forgive my autism, but a dye is a totally different coloring agent from an ink. Some inks occasionally use dyes in some capacity (mostly with a neutral powder to make an exotic pigment color), most just use pigments. If you're doing many very large jobs that require a large assortment of colors, I'd get binder bases by the bucket (and agents to change thickness, texture, finish, drying time, etc.) and dry ground pigments. Prefab inks are fine though, and don't really cost a lot more until you start getting into bulk.

OP here btw. Did some show posters today. First use of another homebrew plug-in. This one is a weighted random dither. Looks a little more natural than Floyd-Steinburg, more like very grainy photography. Lots of fun on very shaded stuff.
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>>907218
I think what he wants to know is which solvent will best soften up plastisol. Kind of curious myself.
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>>900585
I work with plastisol. I can leave it on the screen and come back days later to find its still wet and workable. This is without retarder agent.

>>900582
Low-odour WHITE SPIRIT
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>>908555
apply the white spirit royally and scrub that shit with a disposable towel.

If you want it squeaky clean, use paint thinner.
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>>908555
Guess the difference is I never use pure plastisol. Most of my inks are crazy custom mixes I cobble together from whatever happens to be lying around. Closest thing I every use right out of the jar would be art store "textile" ink, which I assumed was all plastisol, but it does dry just about like acrylics. It'll stay tacky until I put some heat on it, but it's practically impossible to get out of a screen once the water's evaporated out of it.
>>
I made a nice anaglyph image from two pictures in photoshop. Now I want it silkscreened on paper. Anyone know how to separate the colors for this job, other than using Ps's 'select color range'?
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>>908561
If you still have the source images, and you're doing a red/cyan anaglyph print, I'd just do a stencil of each source and print it as a two-run edition with process inks.

Otherwise (not familiar with PS at all, haven't used it in literally a decade), there should be a plug-in to separate CMYK to separate layers for printing. Just combine the MY channels back together for the red side.
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>>908559
Then what do you mix the ink with, for instance?
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>>908563
First of all, as long as it's water-based and not something like tempera I don't pay too much attention to what the actual binder is. Most of my inks intended for screen printing are either Speedball or Jaquard. I know for a fact Jaquard is some weird binder mix optimized for workability and drying time, and requires a lot less heat setting time and temperature than pure plastisol. Speedball I have no idea what's in it now.

I have some fairly thin student-grade acrylic paints that come in all kinds of wacky colors that I'll throw into some mixes. Mostly blacklight-active fluorescents that are harder to find in inks at B&M stores if I'm out on a quick run. I'll also use tap water, glycerine, very occasionally alcohol, depending on what I'm trying to do. Dry ground pigments intended for oil paints, whatever is necessary to get the colors and finishes and effects I'm looking for and make it bond decently with whatever I'm printing on.

I went to an art school that had a pretty heavy emphasis on process painting, so I do a lot of experimenting in that area.
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>>908562
'split channels' is in a dropdown menu from the channels palette.

Thanks, I'm actually going to try this tomorrow.
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>>908564
Heh, sounds awesome.
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>>908602
Please do post results if you get any. I've got a hardon for anaglyphs.
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>>908636
I already made a digital version, so here you go. Looks like a paper version will take some more experimenting.
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>>909004
Sweet. I guess what to really worry about as far as the difference between digital and print is gonna be that cyan+red=white in digital and black(ish) in ink. Might take some thinking through to do an image like this. Line art would be a piece of cake though, colleague of mine does it for art fairs.
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