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Why do switches do not have IP adress when in a private network.

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Thread replies: 67
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Why do switches do not have IP adress when in a private network. CS Homework
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>>51505550
because they function on a lower level
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OSI_model#Layer_2:_Data_Link_Layer
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>>51505624

Could you elaborate just a little bit more m8?
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Also, how do you know if routing is static or dynamic?
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bump
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>>51505880
an ethernet switch speaks only ethernet, IP is a protocol seperate to ethernet

IP was made to allow ethernet networks to talk to each other by means of routing traffic between them using a global addressing scheme (IP addresses)
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>>51506062
ou are speaking to a dumb guy, i made a network in CORE, a network simulator, and even thou all the laptops, hosts, router have ip adresses, but switches do not. Why?
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>>51506223
because IP is used to communicate from one physical network to another, there's no reason to want to connect to a switch from outside of its' network
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>>51506223
can you at least pretend to make an effort?

it seems like you're farming for an answer you can copy+paste without learning anything
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>>51506341
>physical network
elaborate for a poor fellow pls?
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>>51506976
do your damn homework man, i've given you more than enough keywords to do some reading on wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OSI_model
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Protocol
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_switch
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>>51507018
I've done some reading, i was just looking for someone to explain to me. Pls just explain what is physical network
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>>51507083
I know your kind. You're going to fail your study this very year.
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>>51507083
yeah, you're going to drop out pretty soon
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>>51505550
Do your fucking homework yourself
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>>51507167
Guaranteed. I saw plenty of retards like OP when I was in college too. They didn't last a month
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>>51507167
>>51507188
>>51507192
thx m8s
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>>51507083
just fucking drop out; disgusting. I'm not even in CS and I understand at this point. Stop fishing for something you can just copy paste.
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nice art
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>>51507209
i've been giving him most of the information itt and i didn't even do CS
>>
Google network basics. In there you will find the OSI model. Go into depth on each section.
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>>51507237
because its simple as fuck. Ethernet switch was developed to allow physically connected networks to communicate. IP operates on a higher level connecting non physically connected networks.
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Consumer switches operate at layer 2 and business switches on layer 3 and do have an ip.
Also called managed switches, for vlan tagging ect.
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>>51507276
exactly, op's going to struggle hard is he can't even wrap his head around the difference between "physical" vs. "logical", because there's a ton of this in computing
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>>51507224
I will just keep bumping with images until someone not "Holier than thou" appears
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>>51507295
physical means wires
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nice thread.

>/g/ is NOT your personal tech support team.

Also, dropout m8. Your not gonna make it if you cant learn something as simple as that by yourself
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>>51507280
that's true, but that's a bit of a special exception/case, and i'm pretty sure the layer3 component is only for configuring/monitoring the layer2 components
>>
Shit let me explain this to you in the niggaest possible way.

Routers are the cops
Switches are the Roads
PC's are the pedestrians.

Switches just stand there and give peeps ways to go.
Streets don't need a social security number because they streets nigga.
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>>51507321
expanding on this, i don't think managed switches implicitly have to have an IP address, one could manage them with another protocol, like over serial (rs232)
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>>51506976
Why are you in CS if you don't know what logical and physical mean ? Seriously dude. Fuck off back to reddit or learn how to fizz buzz in haskell and maybe we'll accept you then newfag
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So let me get this straight, Switches don't need to have IP adress because they operate inside their layer (layer 2?). IP is only necessary when you need to tranfer something betwen layer 2 to layer 3? Help me out mates, i've never heard this in my whole life.

>another work of art for you
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>>51507389
we all need to start somewhere. Yes i am a newfag in this board, and i've never went to reddit, save for once or twice. I don't understand your fixation with Reddit
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>>51507442
because 36 posts later you still can't understand why the means to connect a physical network doesn't need a protocol to connect a non-physical network.
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>>51505550
Read your god damn cisco companion guide you fucking dweeb.
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>>51507423
It's like a russian doll, TCP is a small doll inside the bigger IP doll which in turn is carried inside the ethernet one, which is the only one switches concern themselves with.
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>>51507503
Actually a somewhat decent explanation.
Not OP btw.
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>>51507423
they function up to layer 2, yes (layer 1 is the actual, physical hardware, that is, it specifies connector types, electrical signals, etc). IP is a layer 3 protocol, it runs on top of layer 2

IP is just one example of a layer 3 protocol, there's other things that can be run over ethernet, for example, IPX
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>>51507503
>>51507520
Did i say anything wrong? And IP is used to what exactly? Btw thanks for not being douchebags
>>
>>51507520
Right in the nostalgia... I remember playing Doom 2 with my brother and my father. We had a LAN with those fucking coaxial cables and setting it up was always a pain in the ass. But fun times were had every time.

>RIP daddy, I miss you
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>>51507573
IP is a means of addressing/communicating to machines which may not reside on your local/physical network

>>51507602
you can still use IPX/SPX to this day, though in the case of doom you might as well use a source port with IP support for convinience (IPX/SPX is actually more efficient, i believe, but it's kinda moot on modern hardware)
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>>51507423
>i've never heard this in my whole life.
can't really blame you for this, layers 2-4 haven't really been touched for consumer systems since the 90's, there's the "recent" push for IPv6, which has only partially caught on thus far
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>>51505550
Consider you live in an apartment.

IP address is the apartment mailbox address

the apartment mailbox is your router, which has an IP address to the outside world

you send in mail (packets) to your apartment mailbox.

your roommate (switch) goes to pick up the mail

he splits the mail between you and him

your roommate doesnt need an address, because all the mail goes to the mailboxes
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>>51505550
don't be confused by consumer "routers"/"modems"

a typical consumer router/modem is actually a combination of a router (software), a switch (hardware), and a modem (hardware)
it's only the router component that uses IP, the switch component does not

pic for clarity
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>>51508035
Being pedantic, a so-called cable modem isn't really a modem in the strict sense, it's rather a layer 2 gateway which translates DOCSIS to Ethernet and vice-versa. The signal is digital in both, there is no modulation-demodulation that an actual modem does. However, the industry decided to stick with the term "modem" so as not to confuse the heck of the end users again, after it took years for them to remember what a modem is and what it is for (i.e. "the box that you connect to your computer to get on the internets").

As for OP's question, a host network interface (such as a NIC of a computer, or a routed interface of a router) is like a train station (where people or goods are (un)loaded onto/from the trains), while a classical (layer-2 only) switch is just a system of railroad switches (duh) which directs trains where they need to go but where nothing is (un)loaded onto/from the trains.
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>>51509172
>Being pedantic...
i thought about that after posting

i live in a place where adsl is the standard though, which does require a modem to connect with

i imagine the main reason for "modem" being carried over is because "that box you use to connect to the internet" started off as pretty much just a modem (serial dial-up modems), and only later got more advanced stuff added to them
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>>51509243
also, for ops' reference, a serial dialup modem only handles layers 1 and 2 (it also has no IP address!), where modern consumer routers have functionality right up to layer 7! (they usually include an http server so they can be configured/monitored with a web browser, http is a layer 7 protocol)
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>>51507930
This is SUCH a good way to explain it
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>>51509414
rule34 never fails
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>>51509414
this a sfw board
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>>51509449
don't worry it's safe, they're shielded twisted pair
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>>51506062
just don't tell him about layer 3 switches
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In the four hours this thread was up you could have read through all relevant wikipedia and more. Are you sure you even care for CS?
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>>51505550
Switches are rarely the destination of a IP packet (only when configuring it) and thus don't need to be addressable, therefore don't need an IP adress.
Switches do forwarding decisions based on Layer 2 adressing (MAC adresses), Routers do so based on layer 3 adressing (IP adresses).
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>>51507083
Please dont become a network engineer rajesh, we dont need more shit like you
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>>51505550
They can have IP's, but are used for remote administration ONLY.
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OP here, many thanks to some of you guys, you helped a lot.
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>>51505880
Look up the 7 tcp-ip layers.
Switches work on the mac address.
Something like your computer or a router gets (or makes) a packet with an IP address.
It works out the next step in the chain to send it. If it's trying to send it to google, then it knows it will have to send the packet to your router first, and the router can work it out from there.
It gets the router's MAC address and sends the packet, with google's IP, to the router's mac address.

If it wanted to send something to another computer on the network, it, again, finds it's mac and then just sends it.

All a switch does is keep track of what devices have which mac, so when it gets a packet go through it it will know which port to send the packet out.
Thread posts: 67
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