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Is there any reason for not just using 125° capacitors with

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Is there any reason for not just using 125° capacitors with a higher voltage, instead of buying different ones at 85°/105° and 16-100V? Apart from size and price?

I want to replace a bunch of old dry caps and they are labelled 47µ/16V/85°. Instead of buying caps with exactly those specs, I think about buying 47µ/125°/100V instead.

From what I understand, using caps specified for higher temperature increases the lifetime, and the voltage does not have any effect, except I could replace a larger range of 47µ with just one type, like 16V-100V.
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Grossly over voltage rating them is not ideal. ESR may be very different too.
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>>1241974
It really depends on what you are feeding them. If the voltage you are feeding them is over 16V then you are out of spec for the board you are working with. If you are feeding a 100V cap only 16V then there's no problems so long as the 47µ matches. I'm constantly using larger voltage and temp caps for tons of things. In some applications, you want to replace it with the exact specs, but that's really only for analog communications like HAM radio or micro-computers. Even then its only in certain places within those that it matters.
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a 100V cap is gonna be 5 times bigger, so it probably wont fit on the board, and the pin spacing is gonna be different. so, it's fine if you do it, it's just not practical.
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>>1242096
I'm just replacing caps in some low-tech electronics, like old computer speakers and a kitchen radio.

>>1242110
Almost forgot about pin spacing, thanks for reminding me. Maybe I better go for a little less voltage then, like 40-50V; that still covers most of what I need.

Thanks guys!
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>>1241974
it highly depends on the application you are using these caps on
for power supplies it usually no problem to replace caps with higher voltage value as long the farads are right. Problem comes when it's a tight fit.
Higher voltage usually means higher physical size and for example in my PC PSU the fit is so tight that i'm literally forced to use exact 6.3V/2200uf because they are the only ones that are 8mm in diameter and will fit in there
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>>1242967
>>1242110
I've had to use jumper wires in the past for replacing things like that.
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>>1242988
well, niggerrigging is always a viable option...
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>>1242997
I've had several electronics with jumpered caps that were designed that way.
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>>1243001
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File: S5001046.jpg (75KB, 545x359px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
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>>1243005
It is pretty common. Just look at the back of a PCB and you'll often see bare jumper wires stretching across from one location to another.
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>>1243009
i thought you are talking about components sticking out on longer leads because they don't fit the designed fingerprint
jump wires are common, i know
every single sided board has them, because "muh 1c saved from double sided pcb, yo"
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>>1243024
Where are getting your double sided PCBs that are only 1 cent more than single sided? Hook me up.
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>>1243034
when you order 10k pcb's i'm pretty sure the difference in price is neglectable, you piece of straw grabbing faggot shit
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>>1243024
I've seen those too, but those in >>1243009 are more common due to easy machining..
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>>1243009
Revised circuit designs, many times.
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>>1242110
>a 100V cap is gonna be 5 times bigger

Energy in a capacitor is proportional to the square of voltage. Thus, a 100V cap is not ~6x larger, but actually nearly 40x as large.

Assuming you're getting the smallest form factor you can for a given capacity, anyway. In practice, there won't be that much of a difference, but it will still be a substantial difference. Not to mention the cost difference will be nuts.
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File: giggle.jpg (21KB, 255x352px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
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woah, look at this nerd right here >>1243144
let's laugh at him, guys
Thread posts: 18
Thread images: 4


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