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>major in math and minor in computer science
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>major in math and minor in computer science

will this truly keep me above the wave of saturation in the academia and industry?
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Congrats, you are practically a shoe in for a sales position at Best Buy™ with those credentials
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>>7808829
I work for a recruiting company, but my job let's me know about many other people's jobs while unfortunately barely advancing at my own.

A major in math and knowledge of computers is quite flexible. I don't think you'll ever be stuck for work, but if you're determined to find a special niche, whether it be research or in a job, you'll have to carefully select your first entry level position or your next degree in education.

Math means you're a bright cookie, true or not. You just need to find out what you'd like to specialize in, which is hard, because how can you know before getting to the position? Well anyways, you have three years out of college until you start finding difficulty in specializing and getting entry positions.

May I ask what you'd like to do?
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>>7808854
i'd like to try graphics programming to develop 3DCG applications that improve rendering times, verlet integration for cloth and hair, and so on. anything CGi oriented is what i'd like to do for the CS minor side.

on the math side, i like nonlinear PDEs and nonlinear functional analysis, and would like to contribute in those areas research-wise.

i just can't decide which hence my major/minor plan.
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>>7808854
I would like to ask for a bit of help as well.

I'm a junior in college about to graduate in December of this year.

I only have a degree in math, no minor in computer science. However, I have taken a class in programming and I audited one in finance, for whatever that's worth. Before I graduate, I'm going to take a course in actuarial statistics as well. I am also studying for actuarial exams.

My single goal is simply to minimize the time after I graduate before getting a job. Whether that's a very nice job in banking or something a bit less prestigious, "sales rep." for Best Buy is kind of irrelevant for me. I need something which can pay my bills immediately upon graduation. THEN I can happily continue looking for jobs as an actuary with the exams passed and go from there.
I am applying for every internship I can find right now but I am not sure I'll have any luck.
Ideally I would love to find a job in finance, perhaps making financial models or doing market analysis. I would also love to be an actuary, hence why I am studying for the exams.

Do you have any advice for me by chance?

I would really appreciate it.
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>>7808863
Ah, I should have clarified what type of recruiter I was. I actually work extensively with automotive suppliers and manufacturers in the Midwest, particularly Detroit Metro area. Most of my experience is seeing people with scientific/mathematical/engineering degrees and seeing where they can go within the scope of manufacturing and engineering.

I have to be honest, I am not familiar with research in the slightest. Most of my programming experience comes from programming engineers must use or like your CNC machinists. I don't have any advice for your specific desires, unfortunately. :(

However, I can say that your studies make you eligible for a lot of your standard jobs that can mature into 100k+ positions, like accounting. That's pretty much all I can help you with man, sorry.
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>>7808877
>>7808877
Math degree makes you eligible for a lot of entry level positions (that you seem to already suspect) like banking, sales, etc. But I think for someone interested in actuarial stats, accounting might make a prestigious, easy, and useful entry level position for you. My post it too long, but I'll post some tips for you guys in a second.

Thanks guys one sec!
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>>7808877
1. Make your resume, load it with keywords (audit, finance, sales, actuary/actuarial, accounting, etc). and upload your resume to a bunch of different job sites two months before graduation. I recommend monster, careerbuilder, and then indeed.

2. Consider which direction you want. I recommended accounting, because its mathematically based. It's prestigious and is a gateway for other business applications of math. If your first job is sales out of college, you have only a few years to find something relevant before youre branded as a sales rep.

3. You are entry level, which means you'll be making 30-50k depending on your location and luck. Very few people make 60k+ out of college, not even engineers usually. New grads always expect it, and as a result they pass up on some solid entry level work experience. You might make 40k out of college, but in three or five years, you could be making 65k due to your entry experience. Get your foot in the door first.

4. When you find a job that you like and is useful for your career ambitions, STAY THERE FOR THREE OR MORE YEARS. Seriously, it'll pay off so much. Your resume will look bomb as fuck.

Again, I recommend accounting. You dont even need an accounting degree for some positions. And btw don't switch to business.

IF you have anymore questions, I'd like to answer.
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>>7808920
Thank you very much. I have uploaded my current resume here. Please let me know if there is anything else you can gleam from looking at my resume.

My friends for example have all gotten jobs with 70-90k starting, even ones who just majored in math, at big prestigious banks. But that is probably because I go to UPenn, so I realize this is probably not the norm and don't expect it. Like I said, just something to pay the bills right now. 40k a year would be wonderful.

I will absolutely take you advice on number 4 there, staying in the job for a few years. Thank you.

Accounting is great but I am curious because I thought accountants had specific exams they need to pass first and also need to be familiar with specific accounting software. Is this not the case? Is my resume not more suited for bein an insurance actuary?
But I will certainly keep accounting in mind. I will apply for everything, but that especially. Thanks.

Please let me know if my resume adds anything. Truthfully I could probably try to tailor it more to a specific job, as you suggested, but this is the most general one I have at the moment.
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>>7808937
The graduation date should say December 2016 though. I just wrote May 2017 to make it absolutely clear to OCR internship recruiters that I am a junior and not a senior.
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>>7808937
I'm pretty sure you could get a degree in woman studies at UPenn and still get a decent job, anon.
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>>7808897
>I actually work extensively with automotive suppliers and manufacturers in the Midwest, particularly Detroit Metro area.
Hopefully you're still here? I live in the Midwest (Milwaukee to be specfic) and am currently doing three years into my math degree. My GPA isn't anything close to stellar; I'll probably graduate with around a 3.2, but my math GPA is currently around a 3.6. I started off wanting to be an actuary but that field is getting more and more saturated and I haven't taken any of the tests yet, so I'm not exactly sure how that will work out. I find that my primary interest in math still seems to be in the area of financial mathematics, and I plan to pursue a career along that path, but I would like to see if I have any other options. What jobs in manufacturing can a math degree really get you? I assume most positions are filled with mechanical or electrical engineering majors and maybe a few physics majors? In general if you have any other advice career wise (aside from the stuff in >>7808920), I'm also getting a minor in economics and have taken a couple accounting and finance classes.
>>7808937
That resume looks stacked, I really don't think you're gonna have any problems finding a job to pay your bills.
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>>7808854
>>7808897
For people that prefer the city and don't want to work on an oil rig/plant too far in industrial country side, what's the earning potential of a ChemE in industry really? I'm a master's student with 2 good internships and a decent Github profile with published scientific programming projects (Python and MATLAB).

Is it actually worth it to leave academia for the money?

I can earn about 50-60 in academia at my department initially and eventually around 80-90 without consulting etc. I just enjoy academic work environment so much than industry / private R&D. I actually enjoy teaching too, but I don't know if I'm giving up my chances of ever breaking 6 figures.


Sorry I don't mean to pry for free advice, I'm just a bit desperate I need to make a choice soon.
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>>7808863
anyone?
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>>7808937
rEEeeeeEEE
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>>7808937
Dude, not him, but don't put calculus and analysis on your coursework, everyone knows what's in a math degree it looks rediculous, just keep the out of the ordinary coursework like business+programming and maybe the first 3 you mentioned since they are more specialized.
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>>7808937
Resume looks good! It's a typical new grad resume, so it's filled with crap no one truly cares about, but it's fine. I would just enter more key words, but it's fine.

>>7808953
Hey, still here. GPA does not matter to employers. Finding a good personality is hard enough. I'm in Chicago, but I actually don't do any recruiting in Wisconsin. However, I can tell you about manufacturing and math.

At the very least, you can do any entry level business position, but that would be lame considering you did math. You can also do entry level production positions, but those are like your hands on assembly line types. You'd excel at those, but only because you'd be the most educated one there. But you CANNOT do engineering. You'll need a degree for that, I promise. Physics majors wouldn't get them either.

I've recommended accounting to two previous posts, and I recommend it again. Math means you are eligible for entry level accounting, and those jobs are out there if you're willing to suck it up and take a low entry level pay and possibly relocate.

By the way, your majors and minors in business are appreciated, but ignored as to the specific field you studied. Finance or economics? Doesn't matter. I recommend studying whatever field of business you want if you're considering it, because it truly won't matter. It's just a cute plus to your resume (and your education experience)

Im reaching my post limit again, one sec guys.
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>>7808950
>>7808953
Thank you for the nice comments.

>>7808954
I can't speak for your field, it's true, but I wouldn't leave academia either if I were you. As far as I know, if you can get a job as a professor teaching which makes decent money, you should stick with it because it's a pretty "cushy" job to have as far as I know. But I suppose it's true there's most likely a ceiling to your income if you do.
Someone else can probably answer your question in better detail.

>>7808965
Why this?

>>7808967
Ok thank you I will do that.

>>7808969
By keywords, you mean words that are specific to the job I am specifically looking to apply for, correct? Not something I can change now without necessarily knowing what sector I'm applying for, right?
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>>7808969
Yeah I figured there really wasn't anything good manufacturing wise for me, just wondered if maybe there was something I missed out on. Anyway, thanks a lot man! It's rare you get someone who genuinely wants to help people and not just memespam on /sci/, it really is appreciated.
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>>7808967
Nah man, employers don't look into resumes that hard. He can keep it. I promise you I spend like 30 seconds top on a resume before concluding. Thats longer than a lot of other people.

>>7808954
Chemical Engineering? Arghhh... I don't know how to say this.

Well, the automotive industry hires chemical engineers the least. We just don't need them as often unless the company specializes in chemical products or applications. And shocker, they are usually in bumblefuck. Another problem, they don't pay well. I've hired chemical engineers for 15$/hr in Illinois. Yikes.

But chemical engineers can do much more than their resumes or education suggests. They can actually do quality engineering, manufacturing, industrial, etc. Not mechanical or electrical obviously.

So your question: is it worth leaving for six figures? Honestly, I would stay if only because chemical engineers aren't in demand. If they are, they're being paid nothing. You COULD do quality engineering/manufacturing at a entry or mid level for like 50k-60k and then work in that for 10-15 years and eventually demand 6 figures. It's a long term plan honestly, and there's a chance you might not like the hands-on aspects.

But the oil chemical engineers do get paid a lot more, but those are, as you said, far away and competitive.

I can post more in a new post.
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>>7808954
get your fucking PE you retard.
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>>7808975
Yes no problem! I'd post more, but it's hard to write down everything. If you'd like personal advice, I'd be happy to swap contact info.

>>7808972
Keywords can be creative, but I would include more terms, even if it's just names of important classes, to help your resume pop up more. Trust me, new grad resumes are not expected to be robust with information. Sometimes recruiters and HR will literally see your degree, your grad date, and check to see if the resume is clean and spelled correctly. Some HR managers dont even go that far. I think you've got a great resume as it stands. I especially like that you've left out the "objective" section that plagues so many resumes. Objective sections are sometimes helpful, but realistically they limit you. More on that if anyone has questions heh.
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>>7808980
>Nah man, employers don't look into resumes that hard. I promise you I spend like 30 seconds top on a resume before concluding.
Yeah, but also kind of my point, if they're scanning resumes they/you're not likely to read a course list, but you're more likely to read a much smaller list standing on its own under "other coursework" or similar, especially if something on the list stands out as "not math BS" like his business and programming which is unique from other math degree holders.
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>>7808984
I'll keep that advice in mind definitely.

I'm not the person you replied to first there, but if you don't mind I'd be happy to exchange contact information in the event that I need some personal recruiting advice later this year as I'm about to graduate.
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>>7808987
I would agree with you completely if he was not a new grad. Experienced recruiters and HR managers do not expect much from new grad resumes. I would say it's just filler at the most, but that's okay. New grads are allowed filler. But if he was, say, three years out of college? Yeah, I'd delete that right away.
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>>7808991
Surely, I probaaably shouldn't put personal info up, but you can skype chat me?

[email protected]
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>>7808980
Alright thanks.

Yes our industry is oversaturated as fuck for the last few years now. It used to be very healthy when I started, but we never recovered from 2008.

Nice to know it sucks for us in other industries too.

I should probably just gun for oil and hope for the best. Fuck finance, IT etc.
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>>7808983
Of course I'm getting my PE, academic experience research counts towards industry experience in case you didn't know. There's never a reason not to get your PE it's always a nice salary bump.
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OP here. how about Engineering Physics with a material science specialization?
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>>7809000
Sure. I can add you on skype, but I'll also just send you a quick e-mail, if that's alright, stating my name so I have your e-mail for later.

My e-mail starts with an "rusc" for reference so you know it is me.
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>>7809003
Honestly if you were forced to do hands-on engineering in manufacturing, I would seriously recommend quality engineering. They're seriously never out of work for long, especially if they've worked automotive manufacturing or even aerospace.

Chemical engineers, I think, have probably one of the hardest times in college. They get double penetrated by chemistry and engineer concepts only to graduate and accepting 40k. Meanwhile, mechanical engineers with a much easier curriculum are getting 50 or higher in some areas... kinda sucks.

Speaking of engineering, electrical engineering is basically the god-tier at the moment. I can't tell you how fucking annoying it is trying to find an electrical engineer.
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>>7809007
Hey there. I haven't seen an engineering physics major before, not lying, but I can tell you if it's an engineering degree, it's flexible.

Materials science engineering is also an interesting choice. They're not as common, actually probably the least common, but they can do anything an industrial engineer can do. I have a soft spot for them. It's definitely a useful field to study in my opinion and experience.
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Anyways y'all, I'm headed to bed. My email is posted above if anyone else needs more advice or explanation.

I might just make a post some other day specifically for these kinds of questions. Sorry to hijack the thread!
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>>7808829
The best people from the best universities make it in academia at the best universities. The meh people from the best universities make it in academia at other universities.

That is my impression anyway.
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>>7809012
I could probably get a job in chemical manufacturing from the company I interned at since the boss loved me though I don't know about what salary he'd offer me, but I think it would be more relevant than quality in "mechanical manufacturing" type jobs for me long term.

But I don't think I've quite expressed how much I hate hands-on, factory office shared with retarded employees and rural living conditions. If I can't get a really high salary then I would just quit engineering to be honest. It's just not worth the amount of work you need to put it compared to cushier jobs in the 30-40 braket.

My adviser thinks I have a good chance of making it in academia, but I know my work is too theoretical and I'm completely fucked if I don't. I don't think it's worth the risk taking it all the way to post doc, considering I exactly didn't graduate from a top 10 university.

>graduate and accepting 40k.
Call me a spoiled shitstain millennial, but there's no fucking way I'd accept an offer below 60k and I cannot comprehend why people with this degree would. And like you said getting through this degree and then being paid less than lit. majors, just fuck no, the field might be oversatured, but I know the value I bring to company is much higher than that. I'd kill myself out of before working as a ChemE for that low.


> I can't tell you how fucking annoying it is trying to find an electrical engineer.
Thanks for the advice, I will tell my cousin to go EE and steer clear of the oversaturated hellpit that is ChemE.
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>major in math, minor in EE

How is this, considering I'm also taking courses learning to code in MATLAB, Python and Java?
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CS and Stats seems to be the most popular major now days, so I would highly doubt it. You'll be caught in the 'data science' or 'big data' meme being exposed as just a rebranding of a bunch of old jobs that were never mass employers, ever.

>>7809507
If you can get an internship in EE, you should be great. If you are relying on maths, you have some problems.
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>>7809515
>If you are relying on maths, you have some problems.
Why though?

What is it that makes EE so in demand?
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>>7809524
>why

You are a blank slate with potential. Someone has to make something of you and take a loss in the process.

At least with other fields, internships or entry level jobs can get some decent work from you from the start so the losses in productivity and payroll aren't immediate.

>ee in demand

I never said it was. If you can get into it, then you will be trained to do a job which isn't going away which you can rise up the ranks with. The better you get through experience and hard work, the more you get paid and the better of a life you have.
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>>7808937
Do you have a template for this resume ? it looks pretty
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>>7809546
>You are a blank slate with potential. Someone has to make something of you and take a loss in the process.
I know that, but why is relying on mathematics bad?

I thought it had good job prospects.
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>>7809636
it looks like shit, get yourself a Plasmati graduate cv LaTeX resume, but change the font cause the default one sucks
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>>7809546
>>7810020

Electrical engineers are not as common as mechanical engineers, but they can do a lot of what mechanical engineers can do but more. They'll usually be great for entry level positions working with electronics for the automotive company. I work with a particular client that does infotainment, and they'll actually pay 70k for electrical engineers fresh out of college who know anything about speakers or radios.

And that reminds me: infotainment is huge. Not many people doing it, but I've seen guys with 5 years experience getting 100k+ offers.
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>>7808920
>Very few people make 60k+ out of college, not even engineers usually.

This isn't true for CS, at least. Hell, isn't the average for CS/engineering around 60-65k for new grads? I think math average is like 45 or something.
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>>7811001
Intredasting. Is it relatively harder or easier for an EE to start a company in his respective field? I don't want to be wageslaving until the end of my days.
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>>7808863
CompSci PhD working in the industry here. There's quite a few jobs if you're interested in CGI, companies such as nVidia, Disney Research and Pixar are always hiring new people and they pay good money if you're willing to move to Cali.

With your maths background, you could try the other side of the coin and try working in computer graphics from perceptual standpoint, trying to describe how humans see colors and working on better displays and processing algorithms that make images look more like real world. There's plenty of research being conducted in the field by companies such as Technicolor, Dolby Labs, Sharp, Samsung and LG. You could apply your non-linear analysis there. That's what I'm working on it pays well.
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