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Why when Germans are speaking English they'll...
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Why when Germans are speaking English they'll speak English entirely correctly and not use any German but when it comes to fries/chips they say pommes? Why just for that one word do you Germans switch to German?
>>
HET IS PATAT
>>
>>53154701
same goes for cell phones desu
>>
>>53154701
Protip: They don't use English entirely correctly.

Their most common mistake is:

"I've been studying English SINCE 10 years"

They refuse to learn the difference between "for" and "since" and no one knows why.
>>
>>53154847
>mfw my German professor tried to tell me handy was an American slang for cell phone
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>>53154847
What do you mean?

>>53154985
Yeah why the hell do people do that mistake? Also it's not exactly the same as what I said though. At least they're using English still.

Look at my fucking captcha
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>>53154847

WO IST MEIN HANDY!

ACH NEIN! MEIN HANDY IST KAPUT!
>>
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>>53154985

I have also noticed that Jurgen Klopp says "in this moment" a lot, instead of "at the moment", e.g. "in this moment we do not worry about this".

I think it's probably because in German you would say "in deisem Moment"
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>>53155590
>Also it's not exactly the same as what I said though.
You said
>when Germans are speaking English they'll speak English entirely correctly
I gave an example where this wasn't the case.

It drives me mad, and when I asked a German directly why they make this mistake with no desire to correct it he just said "because in German we don't make that distinction"...
>>>yes well you're not speaking German are you<<<
>>
>>53156524
Yeah but I meant it as in they're using the English language. Words in English. I know they make some mistakes otherwise but still many Germans don't make the mistake you pointed out either.

Yeah I don't understand that thing either when people don't want to do something correctly,i also don't get why correcting people is considered rude, you're helping them out...
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>>53156260
Japanese say 'handy phone" still on occasion, too.

It's a throwback to the PHS system days and stuck because (I guess) it's considered cute to say it instead of "keitai/keitai denwa".
>>
>>53156260

pretty good

Kaputt with 2 T
>>
>>53156682
I know what you meant, bro. I only expended on your OP.

Let's revel in the idiosyncratic nature that is selective German learning.
>>
chips are something entirely different here and you can't expect people to know the vocabulary for ever single dish there is
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>>53156704
Germans call mobile phones handy?

>>53156794
I thought they were supposed to be efficient and smart why would they resist learning?

>>53156904
Dude I even see it on this site, Germans speak properly and know English quite well but when it comes to chips it's suddenly pommes. And don't give me the bullshit about not knowing what shit is called, chips is one of the most common things I think most people would know what it is.
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>>53157190
Chips are used in the American sense here, nobody uses English Engish after school and would call fries chips. Pommes is a foreign word as well, French, and I guess people assume that with the English language using so many French words that's one of them.
>>
>>53157190
>>53157264
hahahaha rekt
>>
Bommes :DD
>>
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>>53154985
>Are you needing help?
>It's half nine (It's actually fucking half 8)
>"ACH SO"
>Saying "there" all the time
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>>53157330
Why are you quoting a post that was already directed at me?

>>53157264
That's why I said fries/chips. I don't get why Germans wouldn't just use the English word after at least learning that the word is chips/fries. I dated a German girl and she was resilient to my corrections and so we're my German friends also. Some things they corrected and changed/learned but pommes stayed pommes.
>>
>>53157495
>>It's half nine (It's actually fucking half 8)
triggered you dirty potatonigger
8:30 is obviously half of the 9th hour, hence half nine
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>>53154701
>when Germans are speaking English they'll speak English entirely correctly

When does this happen?
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>>53157699
I don't know, I never experienced anyone calling it Pommes in an English language context, just giving a possible explanation. Might just have been their thing, characters are different. I would have agreed if you had said handy, because that's something many Germans really assume to be a term widely used.
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>>53157782
I mev r paid attention to the handy thing but I think they say but iirc they seem kinda confused when saying it too.
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>>53158081
Never *
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>>53156418
That's the German equivalent of "they've got great character"
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>>53154985
Since means seit in German. And we would use seit in that sentence. We wouldn't say für which is for in english. And seit and since are phonetically relatively close I guess.
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>>53159599
>Met a redhead German cutie today
>No accent whatsoever
Why iz zat so rare for a kraut?
>>
>>53154985
Japanese people always say from. "I have class from 8am". It sounds so weird, just say "My class starts at 8am" or "I have class at 8am".
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>>53161091
It's both OK tho
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>>53154985
Prepositions are hard
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>>53163169
Why
>>
We just can't English really good, deal with it.
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>>53157264

I thought pomme was french for apple, and I thought you used fritte or something
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>>53154701
you're missing the cheese and brown sauce
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>>53164070
My parents and I went on vacation to Germany last year and I told them it should be fine, just know some basic German phrases and they could get by. But half the poor people they spoke to in English got a "deer in the headlightss" expression and immediately looked at me for some reason. It was pretty funny and a little unexpected. I speak German ok and I'd always translate but why the fuck did they look at me?
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>>53157763
Pretty much never
t. American who frequents Germany.
>>
German people always end up a question sentence with "or?"
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>>53164369
Germans are perfectionists. Unless they have spent time in the States, Germans avoid speaking with native speakers because they realize they will sound dumb. That doesn't mean they can't read and write in English; Germans learn the language for their Abitur. They just never speak it beyond that.
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>>53164463
The same reason why they confuse since with for such as in "I have been studying English since two years". They apply German grammar rules to English grammar.
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>my ears when a German tries to pronounce the "th" digraph near me.
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>>53164267
"pomme" = apple
"pomme de terre" = "ground apple" = potato
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>>53164463
It comes from punctuating sentences with "Oder?" which translates to "or", but is really meant more like how English speakers say "right?" at the end of sentences.

It, along with saying "make a photo" instead of "take a photo" we're two of the hardest habits for me to get rid of.
>>
what for you wanna know haha greetings.
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>>53164595
>McDrive
>Drive-Thru for the linguistically inept
top kek
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>>53164267
Kek, in Austria the word for Potato is Erdapfel or literally "ground Apple".
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>>53164729
I don't get it
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>>53157746
This, fucking angloscum can't into time
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>>53164729
>>53164995

I think they just call it that because it sounded catchier to them. For some reason, we use the term "drive-in" for "drive-through".

The joke is that Germans can't pronounce "th" and always say "z" instead. For some reason Austrians don't suffer from that. I get annoyed when I hear someone call a smoothie "smoo-zee" or "smoo-tee"
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>>53156418
this is really funny desu
it reminds me of "in this moment I am euphoric.." etc.
>>
The final confirmation screen in English on the ticket selling machines for Vienna public transport has an accept button that says "OK, I buy the ticket."

Many people visiting me have pointed out how ridiculous that is, I'm surprised they haven't changed it.
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>>53165781
Wow the English is really off on that it sounds cave man like.
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Why when Australians are speaking English they'll speak English entirely correctly but when it comes to fries they say chips? Why just for that one word do you Australians switch to retards?
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>>53167049

>Yanks say come eat instead of come and eat
>Yanks say did you see my phone instead of have you seen my phone
>Yanks say another helping please instead of no I've had enough thank you
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>>53167049
>American "English"
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>>53167049
Because your English is wrong.
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Fuckin Germans
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>>53167254
It's your fault.
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>>53155590
>Yeah why the hell do people do that mistake?
Same reason Anglos get our articles all mixed up: there's no system behind it. It's just memorizing.
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>>53171188
There actually is a system behind it it's not random.
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>>53171247
tell me
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>>53171424
I don't know how to explain grammatical rules dude but there is a system it's not random.
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>>53171188
there is also a system behind our articles
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>>53171681
tell me
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>>53171513
You were so close to having a point. Gee, you missed it.
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>>53164730
He !
We say "Pomme de terre" (ground apple) or...patate
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>>53177599
isn't ireladn called Pomme de terre :^)
>>
>>53171424
"Since" refers to a specific event happening at one time, and the time that occured between this event/moment and now.

Like, "I've been learning English since last year". Last year is vague, sure, but it's still a precise moment in time (albeit a year-long moment).

"For" refers to a period of time, without being specific about when the period started. It's to be used when you are talking about the amount of time that occured during which whatever you are talking about happened.

Example: "I've been learning English for a year". In this case, the year is not the moment when you started learning English, but the time during which you were learning English.
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>>53180280
>Like, "I've been learning English since last year"
what? the entire subdiscussion spawned around the statement that this is wrong.
>>
>>53181120
since last year is not wrong, but since 10 years is
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>>53177923
Na Pratai.
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>>53181534
My mistake. But still when to use which preposition doesn't make much sense and is a matter of memorizing proper use. E.g. why do you say get on the plane and not get in the plane? (coming from a George Carlin joke: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdPy5Ikn7dw)
>>
They also do it on 4chan a lot. That they randomly use one German word.
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>>53182473
Es ist a fun thing zu tun
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>>53164463
I've been doing this ever since I met my German bf (with whom I speak English most of the time). I also can't seem to stop using this stupid fucking "^^" emoticon at the end of every sentence when chatting with someone on the internets.
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>>53182957
Why do Germans use so many faces too? Cute anime faces
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>pommes
>German

New Worlders, everyone.
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>>53186667
That's what Germans call it when talking about it.
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>>53171247
There really isn't
>>
What about, when germans like to put, commas everywhere. It gets me fucking, mad.
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>>53187943
They do that?
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is there actually a system for the english language when to set commas? because in German there are perfect rules for that.
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>>53188045
>>53188123
happens often in relative clauses

In english you say:
"Do you still have the book that I gave you?"
In german they will put a comma:
"Hast du noch das Buch, das ich dir gegeben habe?"
So some germans will write
"Do you still have the book, that I gave you?"
>>
>>53188123
it basically represents a gap in spoken language, which would be caused by a change between sentence particle, for instance.
but over time, the yanks in particular came up with a bunch of retarded stylistic rules for using commas, viz ",which" above, ",viz" just then, and Oxford commas.
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>>53164267
pomme = apple
pomme de terre = potato
pomme frite/frite = french fries
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>>53188361
well, that's not a good rule. everybody talks differently and may pause at different times. in German the rules are clear and they aid the understanding of the written word.
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>>53188419
what would you call a pie made with fried potatoes?
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>>53154742
HET IS FRIET KANKERNOORDERLING
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>>53188512
"une tarte aux pommes de terre"
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>>53188123
You generally put the comma at the end of a dependent clause if it starts the sentence. Dependent clauses start with things like "after", "although", "before", "since". If the dependent clause is in the middle of a sentence, you put commas around it, unless it finishes the sentence. Also, clauses that start with "and", "but", "for", "nor", "or", "so" or "yet" have commas before them.
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>>53188788
you make your apple pie with dirt? we have cream on ours
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>>53188846
Are there examples in English, like there are in German, with which you can show when to put a comma because if you don't it changes the meaning completely?
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>>53189153
Yanks argue that this is why Oxford commas are important
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>>53189098
You're so funny 'stralia, why don't you make a joke about cheese ?
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>>53189256
I like things like this, also:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_path_sentence
and ambiguities.
>>
>>53189153
Let's eat grandma
Let's eat, grandma
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>>53189599
yeah that exists in German, too
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>>53163104
>OK

I wasn't aware that you guys use American English phrases in Australia
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>>53157746
>>53157495

I honestly have never heard anyone use this term before. Americans just say eight thirty or half past eight, but the German guy here makes more sense. Half nine would be half of the ninth hour because you already are past eight.
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>>53154742
Het is friet, kut-hollander.
Niemand zegt patat.
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>>53182428
In this case it makes perfect fucking sense. How can one even have any trouble differentiating between "for" and "since" is beyond me.
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>>53190451
?
>>
>>53190751
Technically half 9 would be 4.50

Half X is like saying a half and X.
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>>53193877

Saying half X, half past X, etc doesn't litteraly mean it is half of that number, but yeah half of nine is 4.5.

It refers to an analog clocks minute hand being half way past the current hour.
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>>53193877

Unless you're trying to say that if some says the time is half nine is referring to the time being 4:30....

In which case, who the fuck would think that way?
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Bumping because I need this transcribed into German.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbVJU1CuM0Q

>You just assured me that I could speak

>(We didn't assure anything. You're under arrest)

>I'm under what?!

>Gentlemen, this is democracy manifest.

>Have a look at the headlock here. See that chap... GET YOUR HAND OFF MY PENIS!

>This is the bloke who got me on the penis, people.

>Why did you do this to me? For what reason? What is the charge? Eating a meal? A succulent Chinese meal?

>Oooh, that's a nice headlock sir.

>Ah yes, I see that you know your judo well.

>Well done.

>And you sir. Are you waiting to recieve my limp penis?

>How dare you. Get your hands off me.

>Ta Ta! Farewell.
>>
>>53164369
I had the same experience, but from the other POV. While I speak english quite well, I completely spilled my spaghetti when some welsh dude aksed if I was alright. Took some seconds of me staring dumbstruck and stammering to recover myself.
Guess this shit happens when you're not expecting to be asked in English.
On the other hand I can talk with my aunt from Straya as if I'd never done anything else. She's got a strong accent. It's like listening to Steve Irwin with a feminine voice.
>>
>>53198095

Help w/ >>53196749 bitte

There's something in it for you,
>>
>>53196749
>Ihr habt mir versichert, dass ich reden dürfte.
>(Wir haben ihnen gar nichts versichert. Sie sind verhaftet.)
>Ich bin was?!
>Meine Herren, dies ist ein demokratisches Manifest.
>Schaut euch diesen Schwitzkasten an. Seht ihr den Kerl...Nimm dein Hand von meinem Penis!
>Das ist der Kerl der mich am Penis erwischt hat, Leute.
Warum hast du mir das angetan? Aus welchem Grund? Was ist die Anklage? Ein Gericht gegessen zu haben? Ein saftiges chinesisches Gericht?
>Oooh, das ist ein schöner Schwitzkasten mein Herr.
>Ah ja, ich sehe, dass du dein Judo gut kannst.
>Gut gemacht.
>Und sie mein Herr. Warten sie darauf meinen schlaffen penis zu empfangen?
>Wie könnt ihr es wagen. Nehmt eure Hände von mir!
>Ta ta! Auf wiedersehen.

That's the best you're getting from me today.
>>
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>>53199919

MAGNIFICENT!

It checks out.

Thank you very much!

As promised, your reward.

A badly lit picture of my limp penis.

(Couldn't think of anything else to give you)

Enjoy!
>>
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>>53201281
>>
>>53199919
>>Meine Herren, dies ist ein demokratisches Manifest.
not really. It's more: Meine Herren, dies ist Demokratie, wie sie leibt und lebt
>>
>>53180280
"Since" refers to the beginning of a time span--for example, "I have been learning English since 2006."
"For" refers to the time span itself-- for example, "I have been learning English for ten years."
2006 is the beginning of the time span, ten years is the time span itself.
>>
>>53203896
>Meine Herren, dies ist Demokratie, wie sie leibt und lebt

That is wonderful, profound and poetic.

I trust that everything else is bang on.

You too are welcome to enjoy the rough image of meinen schlaffen penis.
>>
>>53154985
People who learn German tend to make the same mistake, they say für (for) instead of seit (since).
>>
QUESTION (unironically)

when to say
- in
- on
- at

eg on the internet
in this timeframe
at the car
in the car

dafuq?
i chose what tends to fit best for me - but i would like to have a rule to stick to and not having to rely on my feels...
>>
>>53204447
http://esl.about.com/library/beginnercourse/bl_beginner_course_gr_prep1.htm
>>
>>53204598
>in a building
>at the cinema

___ a cinema?
at a cinema?
>>
>>53160005
That's a long way to write "It's the same word in German".
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>>53204906
You would use "at" the vast majority of the time. The only time you would really use "in" would be something technical related to the building and unrelated to the moviegoing experience itself.
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>>53205077
thats an easy rule to stick to.
why is it not on that page you boasted?
those rules (of thumb are fair enough) ware what im searching for 2bh.
>>
>>53154985
There are no different words for 'for' and 'since' in german. Its always 'seit'. Because they sound like each other many are prone to this misktake,
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>>53205146
I mean, it's kind of on the page I posted. Because "at" refers to a place, it would make sense that saying "at the cinema" would relate more directly to the place and the activities associated with it. And because "in" refers to being in buildings, logically it would relate more to the physical location of being inside the building. Like "there are bed bugs in the cinema."

Yeah, there really aren't any hard and fast rules regarding those prepositions, though following what I posted should generally be enough. I would just use whatever seems to make the most sense in the moment and listen to what native speakers use.
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>>53155569
Well, they're quite handy for day-to-day life.
>>
>>53163728
Isn't that an adverb?
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>>53188419
>literally fried apple

!
>>
>>53180280
Good thing I already know the difference, or else you would have me so confused right now.
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