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Picky son
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Have you been a picky eater as a kid? When did you grow out of it? Or have your parents been successfull at training you to eat your veggies? How so?
My son only eats corn on the cob. No other veggies. His diet isn't THAT bad but the veggies are seriously lacking. What do?
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>image.jpg
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>he thinks corn is a vegetable!
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>>7340084
Tacos with veggies
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>>7340092
Yeah, i'm currently on my phone cause i'm laying next to my baby cousin to make sure he can fall asleep. Fuck me, right?

>>7340100
Don't be a nitpicker. Give me some adv instead
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>>7340084
>What do?
Nothing. Don't encourage it, but don't fight it. He'll grow out of it, and it having a negative effect on his long term health is very unlikely.
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>>7340105
He picks everything out. I tried making pizza with veggies, wraps, lasagna. Nothing. I went by the approach that he has to eat 3 bites of veggies before he gets anything else but it is damn tyring cause it's a drama everytime and i just want to sit down and eat my meal ffs
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>>7340114
I'm more concerned of him being a spoiled picky ungrateful brat. I have honestly considered to just cook veggies for a whole week until he's so hubry he just eats it. But he's at daycare and can eat other stuff there so my plan doesn't really work out. He eats a lot of fruits and also really likes fish. He's very healthy but it bugs me that i have to go trough this EVERY time. I just want him to eat what's on the table without all that drama
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>>7340084

Overcame being a picky eater by first observing the value of food, then witnessed the appreciation of tastes that varieties of food offers.
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>>7340084
>>7340132

Hunger is the best ingredient, so not allowing him meals unless he eats X vegetables per day is a good method, though politically correct tumblr mothering would get uptight about it these days.
The other potential problem here is that he will see vegetables as a punishment and intentionally act like a dick about it and make your life harder.

Whatever you do, remember that eating more of something makes you like it more, especially vegetables. Cutting out sugar also helps but eating more vegetables = liking more vegetables. Find ways to make selection fun and he'll jump on board.

Kids are like animals, it's all about the mental games and the set up and the rest falls into place. Find ways to make him want to try new vegetables and eat them and your work will be cut in twain
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>>7340084
I'm grateful my father is old and strict. Apart from being a great cook, it was always balanced meals, without the extreme use of sugar and fat, that I would guess is common in 'murica. I had to taste it all, and eat a portion of veggies comparable to the meat. If not, I wasn't allowed to go.

Oh, and sweets/sugary waters? Once a week (friday night). Don't let your kid be the one who sets the rules.
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>>7340084
Make dark berry smoothies with blackberry or blueberry and throw some greens in. My friend's son is "pescatarian" but all he eats is potatoes, chips and rice cakes. I'm not a parent but it's imperative to get well balanced meals no matter the age but it's only going to get worse for him later.
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I've got four picky kids. Add that they're on the autism spectrum and damn. That said, don't worry about pushing veg. Push fruit instead if they'll eat it. And then, you can always hide veg in other foods. That's why I created the cauliflower crust recipe in '08. The issue with that was that idea backfired. They still won't eat cauliflower to this day. #tip...don't make pizza crusts out of vegetables and think your kids will eat it if they're picky.
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>>7340084
>My son only eats corn on the cob

Wrong.

You ALLOW your son to only eat corn on the cob.

Quit trying to be a friend, and be a parent instead, which means FORCING your kids to do shit they don't want to do, like eat what you serve them.

Either they eat it as is, doctor it up with something other than sugar and salt, or they eat it cold, but they don't leave the damn table until they eat it, because children don't get to make their own dietary decisions, parents do.
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>>7340084
Used to not like mustard and pickled herring.
Then I grew up, ate a piece of herring and thought it was good.

And the mustard I was offered as a kid turned out to be a tablespoon of dijon.
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>>7340356
>so not allowing him meals unless he eats X vegetables per day is a good method
Speed train to demonization of vegetables.
Just feed him the vegetables you would eat. You have to admit that there are some veg that are tastier than others, especially ones with mild flavors and more uniform/familiar textures.

Good for kids:
>carrots, especially cooked until soft
>corn
>peas
>green beans cooked until soft
>iceberg lettuce

Not good:
>mushrooms
>cruciferous vegetables (perhaps broccoli is OK if cooked until tender, mixed into pasta/served with sauce)
>meme greens (kale, collard greens)
>spinach
>raw tomatoes or large tomato chunks mixed into something
>raw onion or large onion chunks mixed into something, especially red onions

Kids taste flavors more boldly than we do. Just keep the above in mind.
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I was watching Emmerdale earlier and one of the characters fathers raped him every time he was naughty as a child. Something to keep in mind.
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>>7340317
Not going to happen. I myselfe am not picky at all. I eat lods of veggies. No matter what. He sees me eat them ecery day. I tried sooo many approaches.
>pick out a yummy recipe together
>go grocery shopping
>cook together
Up untill now he's hyped and very eager to help
>time to eat
>"i'm not hungry". His way of shutting down ANY veggies. Altought he just stated that he's VERY hungry and i know he is.
>sits at the table and doesn't eat a bite
>leaves table hungry
>doesn't eat untill he can go eat somewhere else

Fml

Same with "tasting games". He thinks they are hillarious. He even eats a few bites of veggies but usually spits them out again.

I don't get it. He had to try all of them since he's eating solid foods and he still doesn't eat it.
I'm really making an effort to make the rest of his diet halfway healthy (he only drinks water, he got a "treat box" with small treats and after lunch he can pick out ONE. if he has eaten the amount i told him (usually atleast tree bites, trying everything). We always cook fresh. Fastfood is not more than once a month. Usually the grandparents take him to mcd's where he doesn't even like the fries.
He want's ketchup and mayo with everything. I resorted to make it homemade so i can controle the ingredients. He get's one portion that i measure out and that has to last for the whole plate. Usually he just eats two bites with all the sauces and then stops eating. He doesn't always get them. But for example he'll get mayo with fish or ketchup with oven fries.
Fruits really isn't an issue. He eats a lot of them. I limit them to breakfast and kindergarden snacks.
He also requests spinach a lot. But that's it. No luck with the "mild" kids-friendly veggies like cucumbers or carrots. Not even with butter, vegetable broth and cooked soft. Or with a yummy dip.
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>>7340459
This. Parent the shit out of your kid
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>>7340436
My sister is a nonverbal autistic and isn't picky at all, because she was exposed to foods throughout her development and weaning. These helped her get over bitter and texture.

There are some foods she won't touch, like bone-in chicken wings, but that is an easy work around. She loves broccoli and collard greens, can't get enough of them. Same with meats, the only seafood she doesn't like is oysters. But she'll eat Asian stuff made with oyster sauce, so again a texture thing.

I hate when parents hide their poor parenting behind their kid's autism, it's disrespectful to the child. With either pickiness or throwing tantrums in a restaurant, autism isn't a sole excuse. My sister can't communicate or live independently as an adult, but she knows how to fucking behave and eat.
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>>7340084
What's with you cunts and you being againt people having taste? Is this some excuse to put a fag agenda on others?

Yes, I'm a picky eater, I like what I like and I don't have to make excuses for it to the likes of you. Now go suck some nigger dick.
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>>7340084
Because I have my own tastes does that mean that I suffer from hosts of phobes and isms?
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>>7340459
This. Also, beat his shit on a daily basis. It worked for me.
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disclaimer: i've never had kids but i've been a kid once.

kids like to imitate so make sure you eat exactly the same veggies in front of him and keep drawing attention to it by saying things like "mmm, this is delicious!" and then the power of suggestion will tell him to like it. it's a mind over matter thing. he'll eat it and like it because you do.

and i think that often it's the texture of the vegetable that kid doesn't like. not necessarily the taste. so maybe blend it up or something.
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>>7340084
Attrition, basically. If I didn't finish most of my plate I simply had to remain at the table. No television, no radio, just me and my dinner plate and my father sitting by to make sure I didn't try to sneak it into the bin. It didn't take me long to learn to just suck it up and eat while it was still warm.

My sister was a bit like your son in that she would only happily eat mashed potatoes and peas. We stopped being served those vegetables until she learnt to eat everything else as well.
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My wife's son is just the same, I don't now what to do, little De'Shonde just wont eat them veggies
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>>7340084
I was more picky than my parents, but now my parents are pickier than me. We only had about 10 things we would ever eat growing up. Once I was in high school and had some friends, I'd go to their houses and a couple of the parents could cook and I got to try all sorts of things.

Things my parents won't eat
>fruits besides strawberries dipped in sugar
>vegetables besides potato
>fish
>99% of cheeses
>barbecue anything
>blackened anything
>smoked anything
>onions

Most options are out. The only pork we'd have are thin cut pork chops fried with breading. Even my brother is afraid of things like like lettuce, tomatoes, bell peppers, mushrooms, anything that isn't fried meat or mashed potatoes. What a bunch of freaks. The most adventurous they get is cheddar cheese. Our taco nights were ground beef (3% fat) with a packet of taco seasoning and the crunchy taco shells. No hot sauce, no shredded cheese, no sour cream, no tomatoes, no lettuce, no tortillas.
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>>7341455
My family all have pretty much the same advice and it worked on all of our generation except one cousin who was let off:

Start as soon as they begin to eat solid things and experience tastes. Obviously there's the baby food stuff and even that has multiple ingredients in, but even before they're 1 a kid can be given meals like mashed potato, minced meat, gravy and cut up vegetables that all makes a mushy but textured mess that they'll almost always eat. Cut up small bits of carrot and broccoli and just sneak things in every now and then -- if you cook them a very basic and sloppy meal the chances are you'll be including multiple vegetables.

Then, when they're a little older and you're eating with them, just give them a basic meal and have things on your plates like more stronger-tasting vegetables and let them find an interest in the things themselves. Let them try stuff and absolutely don't pressure. If they don't like the taste of something, then you can include it "disguised" (ie, cut up finely or mixed in with whatever) in a bigger meal.

It's a britbong thing, but most kids don't just like the taste of tea but will want to try it because they see a parent drinking it. So you give it to them with sugar in, and over time they'll probably decrease the amount of sugar each time until they just drink it without. Taste develops as you grow, so there's no way you should be going "eat this strong-tasting green vegetable that's barely sweet you little shit." You let them learn the taste over time.

Also, resistance to trying and eating food is almost all psychological and it breaks down under pressure. If a kid isn't interested in trying it then making them try it will almost never result in success. Let them be inquisitive about it, start them off with sweet-tasting things anyway (carrots, etc.) and if need be just disguise them or help the taste of them with sauces.
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Try melting cheese on broccoli or something
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>>7341516
That's the only way that cauliflower is palatable.
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>>7341506
>>7341455
didn't mean to link

Also, some things you just won't win. One of the very few things I dislike eating are raw tomatoes purely because of the texture. I'll eat them if it's more effort taking out/off slices of it from something than putting up with it, and I love tomato sauces with bits in, but it's just the gooey seedy texture. Kiwi is quite similar and I'm not eager about it, and there's probably other things too that will just be off-putting for a specific reason other than taste (which can be developed).

But basically just start them off trying things when they're very young and in their own time. Unless it's sweet or very mild, you don't just instantly start liking the taste of something. And even if they don't - just mix it with nice things to take the edge off.

Also don't let them pay attention to picky little shits or TV that perpetuates "dude greens are shit tasting lmao."
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>>7341519
I'm always willing to try different things out, but learning what I like and don't like is called having taste. It's make me "picky."

Picky really comes across as something that some faggot wants to push on others to advance their agenda.
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>>7341550
There's a big difference between actively disliking particular flavours and having the sophistication to understand how flavours work. The latter is taste.
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>>7341550
>learning what I like and don't like is called having taste

Taste changes and develops, and not just while you grow up.

It's not like your brain is coded from the beginning to like and dislike specific things, or that what you like and dislike can't change either way over time.

Liking food is firstly a psychological thing and then a taste thing.

If you want someone to try something and get a positive response, you need:

>them to be under no pressure and relaxed
>the food to look and smell pleasant and appetising
>a genuine interest in trying it, whether it's to see what it tastes like or whether or not they change their mind since the last time

Then, even after all of this, they might not simply like the taste because it's bitter or too complex or just something they haven't tried before and too strong. This can be solved by using sauces, ensuring it's as mild as possible and/or including it as an ingredient in something.

If a child hasn't developed much taste by the time they eat proper solid vegetables, the chances are they won't like all but the sweetest unless you do the above to them. And that's not a bad thing, and it can be done to adults too - it's essentially just giving their taste a crutch until it develops to like something.

This might not simply happen, even after all that, but it's actually incredibly unlikely unless the first psychological bit broke down somewhere.
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>>7341585
it's actually incredibly unlikely, and usually the first psychological bit broke down somewhere

It's not by any means abnormal for people to dislike things even after trying properly to, and especially when it's not based on taste but things like texture or smell, but usually when someone doesn't like the taste of something (and when kids say they outright don't like it) it's because they weren't introduced to the flavour properly.

You see this all the time when people cook more, experiment and taste complex dishes and find out that they're tasting something they thought they disliked.
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>1st world problems
Make him watch the news and realise how lucky he is to have any food at all.

Additionally, investigate the idea of a possible allergy or intolerance. Maybe he feels sick after eating specific things but doesn't understand why so that might simply translate as "don't like".

If you're still receiving alimony payments from his father then it's you're duty to ensure that he's in good health and eating the very best vegetables that money can buy!
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>>7341604
That's bullshit.
You're asserting that because someone likes or doesn't like something is because that person wasn't properly introduced to it?

What a load of shit.

Do you really believe in that bullshit assertion?
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>>7341606
Have you considered that you're trying to push your faggot agenda onto others and they simply don't agree?
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My nephew is also going through a very picky phase. I'm unsure as to why, if it's just 'terrible twos' or what. He used to eat everything and now just won't touch some things. We still manage to get him a balanced diet, but he's decided that eggs aren't any good anymore, and won't touch chicken. We're just continuing to offer it to see if he'll eat it again.

Your kid sounds like he's a little older though. My siblings never grew out of their picky eating but they were never forced to either. Just keep trying to include him. Pick out recipes, have him try things. Have you tried making vegetables different ways? I know I really dislike cooked carrots if they're mushy, but I don't mind if they still have crunch to them. Just try to keep it interesting. Make him try things - even a few bites is a victory. I know while he's at school you can't dictate his diet but don't let him go to see friends/grandparents until he decides on a better diet, or make grandparents stick to it. Just don't try to force them down his throat.

If he's very verbal or at least communicates well try to ask why he doesn't like them. 'It's yucky' is a bad response, but talk about textures/taste. It's good teaching experience then about verbs.
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>>7341616
Maybe he's smarter than you and you're an arrogant asshole for trying to push your views on him. Arrogant fucker.
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>>7341606
>le first world problems
>Make him watch the news and realise how lucky he is to have any food at all.

Using this logic, you should avoid complex and unnecessary flavours and go for staple and very basic foods.

Also, when a child is forced to eat things that they don't dislike without effort to make it nice for them, as soon as they get independence then they'll avoid it and seek out food they enjoy (usually mild and not complex, usually fast food and things you barely need to cook).

Forcing children to eat things because muh principle and not helping them to learn to like it is fucking stupid, and that combined with not encouraging them to take an interest in cooking is almost certainly responsible for a huge amount of utter shit diets that adults grow up to have.
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>>7341622
Using your logic Hitler should be running the world.
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>>7340084
See, an important question is how are you cooking the vegetables? I was kinda a picky eater when I was younger until I took a shot at cooking vegetables myself. Pan-seared Brussels sprouts with some pepper quickly became my favorite side dish, and relatively healthy.

Try different prep, not trying to smuggle it in like a van full of Mexicans.
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>>7341610
Of course I do. Very few people enjoy the taste of any strong food or drink (remember your first drinking session?) and have to either be encouraged to like the taste or encourage themselves to.

Kids can't/won't do the latter, so as a parent you should do everything you can to make strong tastes palatable so they're infinitely more likely to enjoy the raw taste in the future.

It's just how taste works, our brain doesn't have a huge unchanging list of tastes that we like and dislike. Just think how much smell alone changes how we enjoy a taste!
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>>7341625
So now you have no taste and suck nigger dick?
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>>7341635
I think parents should let kids decide for themselves what they like or don't like, what you're asserting is no different then pushing religion or political parties on them before they're old enough to understand it.
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>>7341550
>advance their agenda.
it's food
kids need to eat balanced food. once they're 18 you can let them only eat nutella or whatever. I eat things I don't like because they're good for me, being a man means sometimes doing things you don't want to do. You think men want to get fucking married? Fuck no, but that's expected of you, so you goddamn do it.
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>>7341614
What agenda?

If the kid's at day care (mentioned earlier) then I'm guessing he's pretty young and probably doesn't understand what's happening with his body. If there's any possibility of an allergy or intolerance I'd investigate it if I was a caring parent.

What's your agenda.
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>>7341642
Nice deflection. Taste and nutrition aren't the same.
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>>7341622
>pseudo parenting
Project harder.
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>>7341616
Kids (and even adults) have this sometimes, all you can do is try your best to make things taste nice based on what you know they like and quietly encourage that they be adventurous.

Getting them interested in cooking is a great help, and also being adventurous yourself is great, like you say, just cooking things differently can make all the difference.
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>>7341643
Maybe if they're niglets, when I was a little kid I knew what was good for me and what was not.
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>>7340084
Growing up I thought I hated leeks and courgettes, turns out my mom just couldn't cook em for shit
So I guess try multiple presentations and preperations
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>>7341652
So what went wrong? How did you end up here?
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No matter what you wankers say, I'll never like broccoli.
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My sister kinda was my mom and also the superior cook. she always made me clear my plate and would always make and include veggies. She'd make me eat them and always would ask like.. Do you want broccoli, or carrots tonight? And eventually i started making obvious preferences haha. Avoiding eating them as a kid to teen seriously stunts our taste for healthy food, especially if nobody in our life ever cooks em well
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>>7341655
Same way you did, because it's a fun forum and after totse died there had to be someplace. There's stuff before &t too.
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>>7341652
Oh, I see. You're suggesting that anyone with an allergy must be a "nigger".
Bye.
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>>7341641
That's utter nonsense and what we're talking about takes place regardless - food you give to a baby, then toddler, then child is all slowly developed from mild and mixed deliberately balanced tastes to proper meals with stronger ones.

A toddler would almost always NEVER grab a cauliflower, eat it and say they love it. You shove cheese sauce on top!

They wouldn't go for sprouts in a meal and decide thay they love that bitter taste unless they were flavoured and with a sauce or mixed with something else.

It's not how taste works! Children and their brains don't develop it independently or have it hard-wired, that's fucking absurd.

You just letting a kid taste things and then say they don't like them and walking away from the experience going 'welp they don't like that vegetable, best respect their wish' is utterly fucking ridiculous and will result in a totally picky diet.
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I sure as fuck wont like cauliflower either.
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>>7341650
what the fuck does this even mean or imply
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>>7341667
Not all but likely degenerates that shouldn't have children. Passing on defective genes is selfish and stupid.
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>>7341642
>my daddy never loved my mom so now im an asshole

Well, at least you eat your vegetables. That'll make your relationships happy
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>>7341668
You can take your cauliflower and stuff it where the sun doesn't shine.
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>>7341678
epic dude xD

upvoted :-)
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I fostered a child for three months who had never eaten a single vegetable. Kids do go through phases, but it's important to be firm.

What I did was I bought several vegetarian cook books with lots of pictures of the dishes. I let her pick what she wanted to try, and then asked her to help me make it. Being able to pick and knowing that she made the food helped her expand her tastes. I would also give her vegetables first, and tell her she had to try them before she could have anything else. Exposure is key, from what I've learned. Try and see what he does like and incorporate that into meals.

I'm not an expert, but hopefully this helps. It doesn't hurt to try, either. If you don't want to buy books there are tons of recipes on the Internet with lots of pictures.
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>>7341694
Getting them interested firstly in trying it and also even in cooking it will help immensely, even if they're set against a specific thing.

There are so many ways to cook most vegetables that it's like saying 'I don't like seafood' because you dislike one fish. The key is getting them interested in trying each thing and then variations of it.
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>>7341704
I agree. Buying the cook books helped me expand how I prepared different vegetable dishes, too. It never hurts to try different preparations and recipes. I think the pictures helped, too, as well as being involved in the cooking process.

I think it's important to remember that you, OP, are the parent, and you are in charge. As a foster parent, I often have to try to maintain a healthy balance between being forceful and being a friend, so I know how hard it can be.

I don't know op, or his son but I would suggest being firm. Maybe trying what I did, or having an all vegetarian menu for a couple of weeks. It can take time to develop tastes, but just knowing, or giving options on what dishes or vegetables might make your son more open to eating things.
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>>7340084
I was a little picky as a kid. I grew out of it as a teenager. There are still a couple things I don't like. Every adult has a couple things they don't like. I think your kid is fine. Just keep having the various vegetables there, and don't make a big deal about it. That usually causes adulthood aversions from deeply rooted childhood trauma over shit that's not supposed to be a big deal. Don't pander to him, but don't force him to do anything. Quit worrying so much.
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All these special snowflakes with their "OMG, don't force a kid to do anything they don't want to do" mentality.

Pathetic.

You know why you force the little fuckers to eat their peas, carrots, broccoli, tomato, and whatever the fuck else is on their plates?

Of course you don't.

You force them to eat that shit so that you can condition their g'damn tastebuds to accept whatever the fuck you put on their plates.

Bitter? Tough shit, suck it up and eat a little bit at a time, and the next time it won't be as bitter, or you might eventually start to enjoy that bitterness.

You're not their fucking friend, you're their g'damn parent, and that means it's your DUTY to FORCE the little bastards to do shit they don't want to do.
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>>7340084
I was a picky eater as a kid.

Funny this is that as an adult I eat anything. The only thing I can't into is okra and that's because okra isn't fucking food.
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>>7340459
this.
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>>7340084
IMHO, the thing about being a picky eater in the childhood is about having a strong flavor sensitiveness and/or being bad educated about it.

I was such a picky eater, nowadays I eat way more things than before but, I still hate vinegar on it's own.
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I was, more or less. I hated onions and tomatoes in their natural form, obviously I ate ketchup. I also ate the stews my mother made for me that had all sorts of leafy greens, corn, and some other shit I don't know what it was. I just never touched the solid chunks of onion or tomato. Now I fucking love that shit. Still iffy about beans, but I'll still eat lentils.

From my understanding young kids usually prefer bland shit they can dip in "fun" sauces usually sweet stuff like ketchup.
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>>7341668
It isn't nonsense.

My cousin's kids would eat the same garlic lemon roasted broccoli as their parents, and enjoy it. They ate most vegetables from the moment they were weaned.

I used to babysit kids in the summer when I was in high school. Most of them were raised by parents, not parents posing as friends. Therefore, they would eat whatever food the parents left for me to heat up. Greens, spinach, sprouts.

In university I worked as a restaurant front end manager and there was this family that came in once a week with their small son. Once he was over 3 and had his immunity built up, he fucking loved salmon nigiri sushi. Ate the shit out of it, with hibachi vegetables that consisted of broccoli, mushrooms, and zucchini.

Then again his parents owned a farmer's market so maybe that had something to do with it.
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When I was young I wouldn't eat carrots.
My dad tried to make me start by telling me that 'they will give you a big penis'.
I didn't believe him so he took me swimming and pulled down my drunks having paid some women there to gasp and say 'its so big'.

Felt like a million bucks after that, ate all my fucking carrots.
Now I realise my dick is 4 inches hard of course.
Fuck you dad.
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>>7343975
>>>/r9k/
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>>7340084
i was a very picky eater when i was a kid, but i also grew up pretty poor. my mom did the best she could, but all our food was either mushy/tough and bland, or had way too many flavors that didn't mix together right. i stuck with dishes that she was good at, like chicken breast and mashed potatoes, for the majority of my childhood.

once i moved out and started tasting good cooking and better ingredients, i became a lot less picky. eggs, cheese, and asparagus are the only things that try as i might, i cannot enjoy. i can tolerate different cheeses, but for the most part i hate it, and the flavor/texture/smell of eggs, no matter how they're prepared, make me nauseous. i feel like im eating a physical fart
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>>7340084
Being a picky eater, especially about veggies, basically boils down to two issues imo.

1. Poorly cooked veg. Broccoli is tasty. Broccoli boiled to foul mush is not. Have the same care in cooking your veg as you do in cooking your meat and this part won't be an issue.
2. Parents being spineless and letting kids get out of eating them. When I was a kid, you HAD to at least try whatever was made for you. If you really didn't like it, you either got nothing or a bowl of cereal or something- nothing else was made for you. And even if you didn't like something last time, you tried it again with the same rules this time.

That combination of rules, along with my parents being good cooks, meant that by the time I was about six or seven there were very few foods I didn't like, and pretty well nothing I wasn't willing to try. As long as you stand firm on the 'you're not getting anything else' line, even if the kid is annoying about it, they'll learn.
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A lot of kids are picky eaters initially. Some are conditioned out of it early on, while some just naturally grow out of it, a small percentage don't do either.

I'm no parent, but I've always heard veggie smoothies work
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>>7340084
I used to have really bad OCD. I couldn't eat dry and wet foods if they touched (like beans and mashed potatoes) and medication destroyed appetite.
My mother was understading and wpuld put each food on its own plate.
She would also never FORCE me to eat. If I didn't eat and left the table then I went hungry. She would rarely allow snacking.
I was lucky, she got the balance of firmness and lenience right.
Because now I'm not a picky eater and cook most vegetables, I like em.
The only thing I can't stand is Cauliflower.
And what do yah know, I have three memories of being forced to eat it.
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i'm only a picky eater when on addy
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>>7340436
Like you're the parent to 4 autistic kids? After pumping out 2 retards, shouldn't you give up instead of further poisoning the gene pool
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>>7340132
It's too late. The kid has already realized he has a choice of what he can eat or not eat. He can't unlearn that. And that's a big deal. If he's in daycare he's recently come to grips with the fact that he's not the center of the universe (like he was as a baby) and he has to take other people into account with his actions. That's a tough one. And not all that long ago he learned that his own will has limits - he can't just do whatever he wants when he wants. Another tough one.

Now look at his day. How much control over it does he actually have? Very little. He lives on your schedule. He does what you and the daycare workers tell him. What he refuses to eat is the only thing he has control over, and he's not going to give that up without one hell of a fight.

Kids grow out of this around the time they begin to have more autonomy and thus control over their lives.
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>>7340084

i am by now means an authoritarian kind of person, but if your child literally doesnt eat any veggies aside from corn then you, as a parent, have to change his diet. cook greens for him. if he doesn't eat 'em, don't give him an alternative.

i'm sure a kid could survive days without solid food, but the truth is that even after just a few hours they'll probably try some broccoli because they've never experienced actual hunger.
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I have messed up taste buds that register most traditionally bitter food as extremely sweet.

As a result, I was a bizzare child who requested salads for dinner, no dressing. It was like being allowed to eat a bowl of candy with the odd carrot and tomato thrown in.

I hope that any children I have are as easy to manage.
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>>7340084
>On a food board
>asking a bunch of childless autists
>for advice on how to feed your kid

Oh no anon, don't ask his pediatrician, or even Google up a parents forum that may actually have specialists in this area, listen to these other anons. You'd actually be a decent human if you'd make a decision, even if it were wrong, but you won't even do that. You really aren't fit to be a parent. All that's left now is the regret you'll feel for the rest of your life from wondering if you may have done something wrong. Enjoy.
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>>7341455
>Our taco nights were ground beef (3% fat) with a packet of taco seasoning and the crunchy taco shells. No hot sauce, no shredded cheese, no sour cream, no tomatoes, no lettuce, no tortillas.
I'm so sorry
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>>7344998
But salads aren't bitter.
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Wasn't allowed to be a picky eater, it was either take it or leave it.
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>>7345119
Pretty much this. The only thing I hated that my parents didn't give me was egg.
Hated pumpkin, but I was still served it and ate it.
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>>7340084

Honestly, I'm still a little bit of a picky eater. I won't eat cheese unless it's pizza (and dislike extra cheesy pizzas), and really try to avoid drinking milk on it's own (OK with milk in coffee and chocolate milk) and other dairy (yogurt and stuff, OK with icecream). When I was a kid disliked even more foods and veggies, but I've been getting over it, couldn't stand avocado and now I eat it with everything.
>>
I ate my own boogers but wouldn't eat peas.
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Make it a rule that they have to try 2-3 bites of everything on their plate. This makes it so that vegetables aren't singled out.
Keep reinforcing the idea that "You won't know you like it until you try it", "Yes, you tried it last time but sometimes people's tastes change" and most importantly you and the other parent have to make a point of following this rule as well.
If you don't like olives, take 2-3 bites of them anyway and follow the rules you set.

Number two is to get the kid involved. Have them pick out some food to try that has veggies (no corn is not a vegetable, it's a grain) and have them help make it, even if it's just adding water to a pot.

Try lots of different ways of making vegetables, my niece likes cooked carrots, peas, tomatoes, cauliflower. But she hates broccoli, potatoes, and onions.

Also be sure to let them know that they don't have to like it, and that they just have to try it. Teach them the polite way to say that they don't want anymore once they've tried it.

If you can, try growing your own vegetables in your backyard, on the balcony, or at a community garden. Get your kid to help out too, not only will it be a learning experience, but it will get them interested and result in better quality stuff, too.

Lastly be strict. Find what motivates your child and use it as a lever. If there's dessert that night, let them know they can't have any until 1) they take 2 bites of everything, and 2) they have to eat a good enough amount of actual food (NOT clear the plate that encourages over eating).
If they like to play board games, or video games, say that they can't until they try 2 bites of everything. Whatever it is that motivates them, use it to your advantage. Don't stop just because you want to eat in peace. It will get easier the more consistent you are.
Don't yell, just calmly explain that these are the rules and why you want them to do it (so they expand their tastes, because vegetables are good for them and helps them be healthy).
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>>7345636
Also, if they have a problem with trying dinner after two bites then saying "I don't like it", then don't allow them to go and eat dessert, or unhealthy food as a substitute. Give them a handful of healthy options like an apple, an orange, some yogurt (not fruit on the bottom because of too much sugar, mix some fresh fruit in or a much smaller amount of jam), etc

If they later complain that they're hungry, tell them they still have leftover dinner. If they say they don't want it, that's too bad. Go to bed then.

Be consistent. Don't give in. Set rules and follow them. Get them involved. Cook your vegetables properly, and experiment. Have one or two nights a week with vegetarian dishes (Indian food is a good place to look). Try and grow your own food.

Good luck OP.
>>
Stopped being a picky eater once I became an adult
>>
pureed veggie soups are fucking delicious op

butternut squash comes to mind. tomato works too.

roasted caramelized veggies can be good additions to dishes or enjoyed on their own. like others have said don't tell him to eat x amount of bites. give him no choice but vegetarian food and he'll eventually come around. you have an obligation to feed your son and feed him healthy meals. no one said you have to take his tastes into consideration.
>>
I'm gonna stand by this post (sorry to samefag): >>7344067
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>>7345302
>too much information
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The only vegetables I'd not eat and still won't eat are okra because they are slimy and disgusting.
Maybe you don't prepare veggies properly? On the other hard it's hard to mess up a salad.
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>>7347714
If okra comes out slimy you're doing it wrong. I cook it often and it never gets slimy. Just use high heat and never cover it when cooking.
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>>7345636
>NOT clear the plate that encourages over eating

Bullshit.

That's meme talk.

As is using a desert to get the little fuckers to eat the main meal. There shouldn't BE a desert except on rare occasions.
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>>7347878
So you totally dry out the sap?

I like it raw. I think the stickiness is great.
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I force all my kids to try before they say they don't like. No child of mine will grow into a picky adult who only eats tendies
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Also getting kids to try new food is a good lesson for overcoming unjustified fear
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>>7340084
I was never really that picky with veggies, but I had weird meat issues. I would often inspect meat for veins or other perceived impurities and would often meticulously eat around them or not eat the meat all together.

Grew out of it around puberty or so.
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>>7340084
I wasn't really a picky eater, I just couldn't do vegetables if I could taste them except Onions I fucking love those.
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>>7348223
lol good1
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>>7341619
awww, poor tendies want to sit at the big kids table!

if you're honestly defending the culinary discretion of a 2-year-old, maybe you didn't get enough nutrients to the brain when you were young.
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>>7340084
I never drank milk as a child cause lactose intolerant. Never had any dairy products in my life. Not even peetzer. And I've never had a single condiment on my food either. I will never try potato salad either. Oh and eggs too.
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>>7345832
Not really. When you think about it it's a reminder to parents that, at some stage, kids will put almost anything in their mouth so when they refuse to eat something it could be more of a behavioural issue than anything else. He could simply be trying to establish independance or be learning how to manipulate situations. Like when a kid cries when they want something. It's just a form of manipulation.

I'm not saying that's the case here but it's a possibility. Maybe it's time for OP to literally show his son who's boss.

Or maybe OP is just a bad cook.
Or maybe the kid just prefers food that was cooked by his real father because it was made with real love instead of just tolerance.
Or maybe I talk too much.
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>>7348382
So how do you know you're lactose intolerant?
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>>7348436
What's it to you, fuckhead?
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>>7348448
Just wondering.
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>>7348451
But why? Do you think you might be exhibiting symptoms of lactose intolerance yourself?
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>>7348436
The doctor told my mother way back then. Though I grew out of it, I still won't drink milk nor eat cheese. Unless it's on a pizza.

>I'd outright kill someone if it's on my burger though.
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>>7348464
I just like to have an understanding of experiences beyond my own.

>>7348465
Why you /ck/ guys gotta clonepost? I don't know who is who anymore.
>>
>>7341448
kek
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>>7341206
What do you mean by "go eat somewhere else"?
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>>7341585
Agreed completely. And I would add that parents doing something retarded like making their kid finish their plate before they can leave the table is the most effective way to make your kid despise whatever it is you're making them eat.

I think the best solution is: make efforts to cook veggies in a form kids will find palatable. You ever looked at the comments on an online recipe? Half of them are "my kids never eat veggies normally but they LOVED this!". The secret is to actually cook tasty food rather than shitty bland boiled vegetables. Do that and just offer it to them. If they like it - and if you did this right they ought to at least not hate it - then great. If not, that's fine, just don't give them anything else instead. Try cooking the veggie differently next time, or use it as an ingredient rather than on its own. If after several attempts with the veggie in different meals cooked in different ways then maybe give it a miss for a year or two.
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>>7340084
I was a picky eater as a kid, but it was mostly out of spite. If my dad told me I HAD to eat something, then I was definitely not going to do eat that thing, ever.

Good ways to combat this specific mentality are making meals that focus primarily on vegetables, but not forcing him to eat them. He can not eat them if he likes, but he won't have much else to eat. Plus, if you do leftover meals periodically, it'll just come back to haunt him later.

Another thing you can try is getting your other family members to specifically request certain vegetable dishes in front of him, which is a tiny thing, but will plant the idea that those dishes are delicious.
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Beat the shit out of your kids and if they dont eat what you give them, send them to bed hungry.

Your stupid bitch should have swallowed or aborted if you didnt want to be tough.
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>>7340723
I'd say this shit is the way you want to go OP

One thing I would recommend would be trying different types of vegetables (e.g. try canned if you normal have frozen or vice versa) because I know I despised the taste of frozen vegetables as a child.
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>>7340723
for what it's worth, I fucking loved collard greens and broccoli and cheese casserole as a child, but hated and still hate corn.

make him try a bite of stuff you know he's never tried before, but if he doesn't like it, don't force that shit
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I never ate vegetables as a kid and wasn't forced to. Now I eat everything. Probably had something to do with me actually learning to cook for myself and actually making them properly and not in to overcooked, unseasoned mush
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>>7340459
This. Never give children autonomy. If you do, they'll learn to make their own decisions and be well rounded adults, and they won't rebel as soon as they leave the house and get their first taste of freedom
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When I was a kid my single mum thought that a woman cooking was symbolic of male oppression that carried over from previous generations so I lived on fast food or I made mac & cheese for myself, and home cooked vegetables at grandma's house was a rare treat that I always looked farward to.

So perhaps OP could give his kid bland tasteless food for a while and then he might akshully ask for some vegetables.
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First of all, make sure you're not a shitty cook. I didn't like certain foods as a kid because my parents couldn't cook for shit.

Second, "this is the food. Eat it or starve." that's fucking it. Wow, problem solved. Over pampering your little princess leads to these problems. "aww munchkin precious pumpkin, you don't want to eat your veggies? Here, let mommy make a whole new dinner just for you my special dumpling pumpkin pants." That's the kind of shit that leads to picky eaters.

Spare the rod, spoil the brat.

Fact is, my sister in law never put her foot down on her spergy little shits. The one is seventeen and only eats hotdogs and mac'n'cheese, the other is 11 and eats only hotdogs and waffles. If you don't man up and mom up, then they NEVER grow out of it and you end up with a pudgy manchild.
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>>7340084
I will not eat anything with...
>ketchup
>mustard
>mayonnaise
>mushrooms
>olives
How much a faggot am i?
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>>7350107

Are you me?

We're both about to catch hell for it too.
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>>7350127
How do you deal with it? All my family look at me like some autist about it
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>>7350136

My family doesn't mind it. Then again, my folks don't know how to cook very much.
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>>7340114
Not true, I dated a girl that's parents had this approach and she's a fucking grown adult that only eats meat, cheese, or bread. Some fruits, but absolutely no veggies.
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>>7350171
>absolutely no veggies
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>>7350107
eh. you have never had good olives and you probably haven't had any mushrooms worth mentioning either - they are very easily fucked up by overcooking, not to mention most commercially available mushrooms taste like nothing much
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>>7340122
I was a picky eater as a kid and now eat virtually anything.

My gateway was vegetable based sauces/meals like Bolognese or tomato pasta sauce and curry. My mother (mollycoddler that she is) cooked everything normally but blended the sauce smooth.

The fact is you cant force him so he needs to be convinced that real food is better, will make him fitter, and not as childish as processed shit. Be firm but understanding, do not indulge his whims, and actually make it taste good. If someone put plain boiled green beans and carrots in front of you wouldnt you rather have some fried chicken?
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>>7340687
>a tablespoon of dijon
I asked my dad for plenty of mustard on my sandwich once and got a thick layer of dijon.

Took me a long time to forgive both of them.
>>
>>7349643
>has no idea what the role of a parent actually is

Surely your special snowflakes will gladly eat right, clean their room, perform personal hygiene, do chores, attend school and gladly do all their homework.

Oh...wait.

No they won't.

Not unless you make them.

Because that's your damn job as a parent.
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>>7350290
Your job as a parent is to prepare your child for real life
In real life, you only get what to do in school and prison; those are the only places you're preparing yout child for, and maybe a life of entry level menial work

You need to provide information to your children and let them make their decisions, and inevitable mistakes now, when it generally matters least

I'm sorry that you're too lazy to actually talk to your kids though. Maybe they'll love you if you shout louder and hit harder
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>>7350320
>In real life...

You are told how to dress.
You are told how to speak.
You are told when and where you need to be for work.
You are told what is acceptable and unacceptable behavior.
You are told how fast you can drive a car, and where.
You are told how much money you must pay in taxes, and when.
You are told any number of things in order to be a functioning and responsible member of society.

That is why you condition your kids to do the shit they don't want to do when they are still little kids. That way they don't have to learn how to do it when it comes time to apply themselves in high school, college, and in the work force.

Sorry you can't understand that, sweet cheeks.
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>>7340084
I used to be a picky eater then I gradually grew out of it.
Really the key is that THEY have to be willing to change and try new things.
Restrict what you have in the house, buy things like baby carrots for snacks, and make things like chicken stuffed with slightly creamy spinach.
Don't try to bargain with them, let them pick around everything if they want, but they are going to go hungry.
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>>7342348
Kei, grandpa
But, >>>/1940's/

It's OK that you're a lazy parent, though
Not everybody has the time to explain to their kids, or give their kids the freedom to make their own mistakes

Just keep FORCING, and they grow up into the timid betas lacking creativity and autonomy that the world needs
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>>7340723
>Iceberg lettuce
I love collards, spinach, kale, romaine, etc. but I have always HATED iceberg.
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>>7350290
That IS your job as a parent, but making a kids world revolve around "these are the tasks you must do or else you cant do anything else" will make him insular, cynical, looking for petty ways out to rebel.

It is always lazy fucking parents, who themselves make the biggest stink out of the smallest everyday tasks, that struggle to get their kids to do them.

When you draw so much attention to it kids will scrutinise and sniff at it until they conclude they dont want, but if you treat it like the everyday shit it is they will come round in their own time.
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>>7341455
That sounds so fucking bland.
Are they mormons or something?
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>>7350373

That's because iceberg is garbage. It's not even worth eating.
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>>7350358
No, you are told what will happen if you don't dress I'm x way, or speak z way, or arrive at this time

Then, you make the DECISION to do things a certain way based on the available information. If you don't dress x way, the company has a bad image, so it's beneficial to dress x way.

That's not the same as contrived consequences, like if you don't do this, I'll hit you/shout at you, or you should do this because I said so. Rather than letting the child understand why they should do something, you're setting up arbitrary rules and being lazy

That's just how it is, sweetcheeks
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>click on delicious fruit tart
>hoping for more delicious pictures
>it's just man-children arguing about how they're the only person who has to follow rules
What the hell is wrong with you people
>>
>>7350372
>>7350380

When the kid knows you'll make them do something regardless of how much of a tantrum they throw about it, they soon realize that the tantrum is just a waste of time and effort, and they start doing what they're supposed to do without having to be forced into doing it.

They begin to think for themselves regarding their behaviors, and learn to make FAVORABLE decisions based on the fact that poor decisions won't be tolerated. Even when it's about a task they don't want to do.

That's why you force the little shits to do things like eat their vegetables. Eventually, they'll just eat their vegetables without having to be told, and they'll come to appreciate being rewarded for their good behavior.

It's called conditioning.

Enjoy your precious snowflakes.
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>>7350406
Sure, sunshine.

Sure.
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>>7350437

>powdered sugar

trash.jpg. What the hell is wrong wit'chu?
>>
>>7350392
Nope. Dad was picky, mom was southern and never ate her families food like pigs feet or catfish. I guess they were kind of made for each other.
One time I tricked my dad into eating mushrooms, I brought a chicken pot pie I made that I got them cut up real fine, couldn't see them in the finished thing. Won't tell him for a few more years so he won't be as mad.
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>>7350450
I agree that you have to be firm with your kids when they have to do something but I know so many people who think play the drill sergeant to their kids and it is time and again shown to be bullshit. Eating vegetables becomes a problem when you say "you better eat those fucking greens or else you won't get to leave this table" because kids have a fine sense of injustice and want to push what they can get away with.
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>>7350455
Nice non-response

>>7350450
The outcome may be the same, but how you get there and what you teach is as, if not more, important

On one hand, you could teach reasoning and the amity to make decisions without being forced (children will feel the effects of eating unhealthily, and make the best decision themselves, if they're active)

Or, you could teach them to do things not because of their own reasoning, but because you said so
That's not preparing them for life
If you don't have the time to explain things to your kids and let their own mistakes, why did you even have children in the first place senpai
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>>7350479
>I know so many people who think play the drill sergeant to their kids and it is time and again shown to be bullshit.

You realize that you don't actually have to use force to "force" your little brat to do something, right? You don't even have to raise your voice. You know that, right?
>>7350482
Your lack of reading comprehension warrants what you perceived as a "non-response".

Here's another one, pumpkin.
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