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Old West Clothing for /out/?

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Is old west clothing functional for being out? Wool is still used today, because a synthetic alternative doesn't really exist. Would it still make sense to wear this type of clothing /out/?
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Why wouldn't you just get modern wool clothes?
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>>620637
I totally could, but I think it would be too much fun to dress like OP's pic. Cross off the hat and it more or less just looks like normal clothing.
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From what I've seen, old west stuff is twice the weight and half as functional as synthetics, though they're much nicer to look at and probably more cosy to wear.
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>>620641
You should join a cowboy action shooting organization. They dress like that and do quick draw contests.

I think it is silly, but they seem harmless. We sell gear for it at my gun shop and people spend insane sums on it.
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>>620643
Honestly, I wouldn't be going on expeditions, obviously. But just for fucking around. God, I'm such a child.
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>>620645
>cowboy action shooting organization
Are these in every state, or...?
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>>620645
I'd imagine that type of clothing would be expensive because it's niche, but maybe I could browse around thrift stores and if I find anything, I could just take it to a tailor.
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>>620648
No idea. My shop is in Indiana, so I'm guessing they are in quite a few since we were never part of 'the west'.
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>>620636
>Wool is still used today, because a synthetic alternative doesn't really exist.
Bullshit. There are a few tradeoffs, but fleece is better in many ways.
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>>620649
Some is and some isn't. Generally the even handmade stuff is pretty inexpensive, but it isn't great quality since it is designed to be worn very little.

Sticklers for "authenticity" have to spend quite a lot. We sell some made of buffalo leather that is 4x the price of the same in cow leather, but some guys absolutely have to have buffalo.
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>>620652
I live where the winters can be windy. Fleece doesn't perform well in wind. It's also annoying when wet. I'm always going back and forth indoors and outdoors in the snow. When I go indoors, the snow on me melts. I find wet fleece to be really annoying, while wet wool doesn't really matter all that much.
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>>620652
What is fleece better at?
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>>620636
We've had this thread plenty of time before but it usually involves cloaks. The answer is it's fine if you want to cosplay but modern outdoor clothing will be superior in every conceivable way when it comes to actual functionality.
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Textile science has come a ways since old west clothing.
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>>620658
>What is fleece better at?
Fleece is lighter especially when wet, cheaper, dries MUCH faster, holds far less water, is machine washable, isn't scratchy.

Wool looks better, doesn't get stinky as fast (otoh I've had some sweaters that smell like a wet sheep when you sweat or it rains), is flame retardant. But it can be a pain to wash, and I find cheap wool is itchy.

Some say wool is warmer but under a wind layer I think they're comparable. Both are warm when wet (at least for good quality fleece) in spite of what the wool cartel shills say, since polar fleece was designed as a wool replacement.

I like fleece when I'm doing something active and possibly sweaty (running, biking, skiing), wool is nice for hiking, sitting around the campfire or going to the coffee shop.

>>620657
>I live where the winters can be windy. Fleece doesn't perform well in wind
So do I. I wear a wind shell. Goretex is great.

> It's also annoying when wet.
Wool even more so. Commuting to work in light rain in polartec bike tights and wool gloves, the polartec is dry enough to pull my jeans on over them by the time I lock up and walk to the washroom to change. My gloves are still damp when it's time to go home.
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>>620646
I get it man, I'm really tempted to get a pair of cowboy boots from a thrift store for the lels, I'm a britbong as well making it even more fucking stupid.
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>>620646
Go for it. I wore my oilskin duster and wax cotton hat out in the rain yesterday.
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>>620645
My neighbor and a few of my classmates growing up did this. Was really cool stuff.
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>>620701
Man I wish I had your ability not to feel embarrassed.
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>>620636
There were many functional articles of clothing that we still use today that were used during the western expansion of the US. I'm more confused why people wouldn't think that there were effective and ineffective examples of clothing from this period.

Wool. Hasn't changed, other than the addition of Merino and cashmere.

Waxed Cotton. Again, hasn't changed and is far more durable than goretex, albeit much heavier. For tarps I honestly prefer this, but that's mainly because it's just what I already own and am used to.

You'll want to avoid most untreated cotton in the winter, but I honestly wear jeans /out/ in the summer all the time as heat retention when wet isn't as big of an issue.

As far as modern synthetics, I think there's as wide of a variation of quality for modern as there are older materials. Polartec fleece is damn fucking good, cheap Walmart fleece not so much. Same with wool, or any other material. It's not one or the other.

>>620696
Again, you can find warmer wool and warmer fleece depending on the brand and production process. The itchiness doesn't come from how expensive it is, it comes from how much loft it has and the type of wool it is. Merino wool generally is not itchy, but has less loft. "Itchy" wool is generally a more cost effective midlayer than Merino wool, as it provides more loft at less of a cost than Merino or cashmere. Regardless I agree with you, fleece can be just as a effective if it's of quality.
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>>620714
There are advantages to being old enough to get away with dad fashion. And I look good in hats.
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>>620637
>Why wouldn't you just get modern wool clothes?

Probably at least half the wool stuff you get today is "heritage" and not too different to what they'd have had, I imagine.
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>>620716
>waxed cotton is far more durable than goretex

Are you so sure? Polyester/nylon (what the face fabric is made from) is far stronger per denier than cotton. I've never had a goretex jacket snag and tear on a branch but I've done it with plenty of cotton and woolen garments.

Goretex is very easy to fix too, just glue or iron on a patch and you're good to go.
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It absorbs water very good insulation
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>>620813
Ha, we must be talking about a different material. There's a reason why goretex membranes are preferred to full goretex on overalls and jackets. Goretex is notorious for snagging in the brush and is considerably more difficult to repair than waxed cotton, which only requires a needle an thread. Wool is certainly not a any better than goretex durability wise, isn't a good shell either, it's an insulator like fleece. Sanded duck cotton, poly/cotton ripstop, and waxed cotton have always been far and away more durable than goretex, fleece, and wool. Of course this greatly depends on the quality of construction however.
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>>620841
>>620813

I should have said "Work" overalls and jackets, perhaps hunting overalls and jackets as well.
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>>620841
My one gripe about waxed cotton is that you can't clean it (except for a cold water rinse), so I don't wear it for anything sweaty.

Also realized on my rain walk yesterday that it's time to reproof my coat.
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>>620670
>Textile science has come a ways since old west clothing.

ie. Make everything thin and flimsy and fit for ease of taking on and off rather than comfort of movement.
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>>620841
>goretex is notorious for snagging
Really? Everyone I know who hunts uses a membrane type jacket with a soft outer shell. If you knew how goretex worked you'd realise that it's a membrane backing that goes on the INSIDE of a face material, usually a hard wearing durable polyester, which is far stronger than cotton. To fix GT you literally just stick on a patch, which is far faster than having to stitch it together.

There are some lightweight shells that sacrifice durability and waterproofing for extra breathability and weight, but we're not talking about those.

It seems like your argument is based purely on luddite feelings and you're unwilling to accept that the face fabric of a proper hardshell made for back country or alpine use by a reputable company is far more durable and lighter than cotton. It is a fact that this material is stronger than cotton.
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>>620841
if your goretex is making contact with the brush, you're doing something very very wrong.

it's a spongy membrane that is laminated to the inside of a face fabric, that could be nylon, polyester, kevlar... the goretex should contribute nothing to the outside of the jacket.

what makes you think a goretex jacket can't be stitched? although a patch, as >>620948 mentioned is likely to be an easier and more waterproof solution.
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>>620636
I'm not sure what you mean. Old west clothing? Like plaid shirts and cowboy hats? Sure, I wear a nice Wind River hat /out/, and Wrangler shirts never go out of style.
Dusters are heavier than a modern coat, but often warmer than most lower-end jackets and of a similar price. If you're riding horses, chaps are just as useful as they were a hundred years ago.
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>>620643
and durable as shit. there were legit cowboys still out where I fish and some wear the classic stuff and some wear more modern jackets and stuff. A lot of their old fashioned stuff is optimized for horse riding in the plains and foothills but a lot of them are riding pickup trucks these days. I personally like the long sleeved shirts and wide brimmed hats but that's about it. Jeans are not a great choice when you fish.
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>>622848
>and durable as shit
so are modern synthetics, It's more about build quality than fabric strength.
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>>620948
I literally said:

>There's a reason why goretex membranes are preferred to full goretex on overalls and jackets.

I don't know where your other assumptions come from, I even said >>620842 to clarify I was referring to Work and Hunting clothes. Wanna know what people don't wear when they know they're going to be scraping up against metal and timber? Goretex. You see people wearing Carhartt and Dickies. If you're just walking or hiking from point A to point B, obviously a Goretex parka or rain jacket would be superior because of its light weight and packability. But if you're going through thick brush or working outside, canvas and poly/cotton ripstop are far and away more durable and practical for me (the "for me" part is key there).

It just comes down to what you're using your gear for. Mine doubles as work and hunting clothes, so it makes more sense for me to have ripstop and canvas. You can patch Goretex yes, but with canvas you can just sew it back together (at far fewer increments of time) and reproof it with some wax you have on hand. I don't have anything against modern materials, Hell, I have a synthetic rain jacket in my truck, in my rucksack, and by my front door and a softshell I wear regularly,
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>>622851
This. The misconception that cotton/canvas is stronger than synthetics that I myself perpetuate comes from price. A Dickies or Carhartt can be had a fraction of the price of a comparably durable synthetic jacket, but that synthetic jacket will most likely be of higher quality and more weather resistant.
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>>620657
I wear a polar fleece pullover and a nylon jacket over that on all but the coldest winter days. As long as I'm not trying to take a nap out on the ice, it's fine.
Fleece also retains its warmth when wet, and doesn't hold as much water, so isn't as heavy. Real nice when you decide to go ice fishing on a warm day in late February.
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