[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / bant / biz / c / can / cgl / ck / cm / co / cock / d / diy / e / fa / fap / fit / fitlit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mlpol / mo / mtv / mu / n / news / o / out / outsoc / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / spa / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vint / vip / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y ] [Search | Extra juicy! | Home]

So you know history huh

This is a blue board which means that it's for everybody (Safe For Work content only). If you see any adult content, please report it.

Thread replies: 321
Thread images: 50

ITT you post the first mildly interesting historical fact that comes to mind

After Emperor Xerxes's first attempt to bridge the Hellespont ended in failure when a storm fucked up his piece of shit pontoon bridge, Xerxes ordered the waters of the Hellespont whipped. 300 times iirc
>>
>>35630
>believing Herodotus
>>
during the battle of Stalingrad a railway station changed hands 14 times in 6 hours
>>
>>35630
Before battle of Vienna in 1683 Grand Vezir Kara Mustafa sent a bushel of poppies to Jan III Sobieski (ruler of Commonwealth of Poland-Lithuania) with a message that "our army is like these grains - it's impossible to count our soldiers".
King John III resent him basket with grains of pepper along with message "our army is like these grains - it can be counted, but it's hard to crush it".
>>
>>35630
>filename

king tut was a product of incest
>>
>>35630
>Herodotus
>the father of lies
Zack Snyder is more of a historian m8

Kant is responsible for the theory that stars and planets are formed from the gradual collapse and rotation of gaseous nebula (and in part Swedenborg)
>>
>>35630
The first Norman Bishop of London (and later Archbishop of Canterbury) was appointed 22 years before the conquest.
>>
>>35630
Hannon (Annon) was a sailor from Carthage. We made it to the West Africa and brought some unknown to Carthagians animals. He was able to tame them, which was the reason he was killed shortly after returning to the homeland. Carthagians believed that anyone who can make animals obey his orders is dangerous.

Pic related, it's the map presenting possible route of Hannon.
>>
>>35723
>>36040
see this is why I came to /his/
thanks for setting me straight guys
anyone got anything outlandish like the OP that isn't definitely false?
>>
>>36040
Herodotus had its cons, but in general he deserves a title of "father of history". Don't forget about his methods and classic "I wrote what I saw by my eyes" sentence.
>>
>>36040
>>35723
>disbelieving Herodotus on something that wouldn't be that out of character for the emperor of half the known world

At least shit on Herodotus for stuff like Cyrus the Great's rise to power or his excursion to the land of the Scythians.
>>
>>36203
that
>>
Thomas Jefferson and John Adams died on the same day, July 4th, 1826, exactly 50 years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, Adams last words were
"Thomas Jefferson still survives."
But Jefferson had died three hours earlier.
>>
File: Mesoamericans.jpg (69KB, 736x542px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Mesoamericans.jpg
69KB, 736x542px
these stylish guys fought with the sharpest weapons in history
>>
>>36074
>Carthagians believed that anyone who can make animals obey his orders is dangerous.
What about the dag?
>>
>>36318
At least he won.
>>
I accidentally spouted in another thread, but when Peter the Great of Russia's favorite court midgit died, he had several midgits of the realm carry the tiny casket amidst a gigantic funeral progression. I want to say thousands of St. Petersburg citizens had to show up for this event.

Peter also gave Frederick William I a bunch of exceptionally tall soldiers in trade for an amber cabinet.
>>
>>36321
Volcanic glass swords? Brutal.
>>
>>36386
what about jumbos?
>>
Before using the horse as a means transportation they were first domesticated by pre indo european people as livestock to be consumed
>>
Being dying of kidney disease at Whitehall Palace, the same place where his father was executed, Charles II of England's last known words were "Be well to Portsmouth, and let not poor Nelly starve", Nelly being his mistress.

Equally famous last words came from Union General John Sedgwick during the American Civil War. Unaware of dramatic increase in accuracy provided by the improved rifling technologies used by both armies, he berated his men for ducking, famously declaring "Why are you dodging? They couldn't hit an elephant at this distance!"

Unfortunately Sedwick was not an elephant and was shot in the head soon after.
>>
>>36321
Who knew that Aztec priests were secretly wizards
>>
>Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher, Fürst von Wahlstatt (German pronunciation: [ˈɡɛphaɐ̯t ˈleːbəʁɛçt fɔn ˈblʏçɐ]; (16 December 1742 – 12 September 1819), Graf (count), later elevated to Fürst (prince) von Wahlstatt, was a Prussian Generalfeldmarschall (field marshal) who most notably led his army against Napoleon I at the Battle of the Nations at Leipzig in 1813 and the Battle of Waterloo in 1815, in alliance with the Duke of Wellington.

Nigger went crazy and though to be pregnant with an elephant.
>>
>>36428
Dunno man, I can add also horses and caws and every animal that can be tamed. They killed him, because lions were binded to his chariot. Conclusion? Having control over animals is generally okay, but lex specialis to is controlling lions, which is seen as "dangerous".
>>
John Lennon shoplifted the harmonica he played on "Love Me Do"
>>
William Shakespeare and Miguel de Cervantes did not died on the same day. The proddies still used the outdated Julian calendar on those days.
>>
>>36427
das it mang
fucking useless against anything that's not soft though
>>
>>36321
Which is a bit ironic considering the Aztec tried to take their prisoners alive so they could be sacrificed.
>>
>>36321
>Using a guitar as a shield
That guy was trying too hard.
>>
>>36569
BAN ASSAULT LIONS!!!
>>
Several of Shakespeare's stories are plagiarized form older works. For example. Hamlet was a barbarized version of Saxo Grammaticus "Deeds of the Danes" modified to be more angsty for his target audience. Othello was almost entirely copied from Un Capitano Moro, and Romeo and Juliet was a rewrite of The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet.
>>
>>36421
>Peter the Great
I remember reading up on him after my last Russia playthrough in Europa Universalis 4. Here is something mildy interesting:

He commissioned a summer garden in his new capital St. Petersburg and filled it with statues and various other artworks of mostly western origin. Said statues were moved over the centuries for various reasons up until the point where no one knew how exactly they were alligned, originally. Only a few deacades ago the original arrangement was achieved after studying historical and compositional reports of the time.
>>
I don't know if this counts, but anyway, it always made me laugh.

>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crush,_Texas
> William George Crush, general passenger agent of the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad (popularly known as the Katy), conceived the idea to demonstrate a train wreck as a spectacle.[1] No admission was charged
>Unexpectedly, the impact caused both engine boilers to explode, resulting in several fatalities and numerous injuries among the spectators.

>Unexpectedly, the impact caused both engine boilers to explode.
>>
File: azzz.jpg (19KB, 236x258px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
azzz.jpg
19KB, 236x258px
>>36689
for the last time, its
fashion>war
for the gods sake man get your priorities in order
>>
>>36386

>Take Ruffles walkies in Carthage

>get shot
>>
>>36852
kek
>>
Emperor Qin Shi Huang tomb is said to have been filed with a lake of quicksilver. Modern tests of the tomb show super high levels of mercury
>>
>>36883
He was also drinking it in the belief it would make him immortal. Ironically, it poisoned and killed him instead.
>>
The Germans shipped Lenin back to Russia by train during WWI. This helped catalyze the Russian Revolution and took Russia out of the war, which allowed the Germans to put more effort into the Western front. Unfortunately for them, it was too late to win them the war.
>>
>>36689
>Not praying to the gods of rock before battle
It's like you don't want to ride into valhalla with a flame spouting motorcycle on the wings of screaming eagles
>>
>>36321
did triple alliance have to ruin the mattress to make his armor?
>>
>>36994
Poisoned his mind first. Poor guy became fucking crazy
>>
>>37024
Herman Li, is that you?
>>
>>36994
Did he ever pretend he was the T-1000? I know that is what I would be tempted to do at all times around a lake of mercury.

Fun Fact: Indians in the amazon uses the heads of army ants for sutures
>>
File: Belisarius_mosaic.jpg (2MB, 1107x1370px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Belisarius_mosaic.jpg
2MB, 1107x1370px
If you have frequented Byzantine threads on various boards before, you might know this one already.

Emperor Justinian of the Eastern Roman Empire send out his generals to reclaim the Western provinces that had previously fallen to barbarians. One general, Bellisarius, was supposed to reconquer Italy from the south. He did that and even captured the Ostrogoth king in Ravenna. The Goths were so impressed that they even offered him the title of the Western Roman Emperor before that. He actually accepted, the madman, but only as a trick to gain local support and even reach Ravenna. Nevertheless, conflicting reports had reached Justinian and made him recall Bellisarius back to Constantinople, which he did. He even brought the Goth king and some war loot.

In case I got something wrong, here you can read about it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gothic_War_%28535%E2%80%93554%29
>>
Ned Kelly, as an Australian criminal, donned a makeshift suit of armour and shot out with the police. Was eventually hung until dead. Official Beard Representative of Australia.
>>
File: 7526136_orig.jpg (297KB, 1066x800px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
7526136_orig.jpg
297KB, 1066x800px
>>37390
Kelly's armour.
>>
File: 1398736274180.jpg (27KB, 550x281px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1398736274180.jpg
27KB, 550x281px
>>37441
>>
>>35630
When an Athenian accused Spartans of being ignorant, a Spartan agreed with him, "What you say is true. We alone of all the Greeks have learned none of your evil ways."
>>
>>35630
When the Scandinavians of Iceland had a meeting, ranging from community issues to the ascension of a new king, the get-together was referred to as a "Thing."
>>
>>36203
Except that really is out of character; if you look at it objectively instead of reading propaganda written by someone who hated the Persians and wanted to demonize them; you'll find Xerxes and the Persians as a whole weren't so barbaric. It's a real shame that people in the West nowadays are so ignorant towards towards other cultures. I think the Persians get the worst of it.
>>
>>38222
trips confirm scads as the least nonsense civilization
>>
>>35630
Taoist Liu Ling (221-300 C.E.) would walk around his house naked. To startled visitors he would say "the universe is my home, and my house is my clothes. What are you doing in my pants?"
>>
>>35630
>mildly interesting historical fact
Enrico Dandolo, doge of Venice, was still leading military campaigns on the field at the venerable age of 98.
>>
>>39016
i want to be this man
>>
Caligula did something similar. He declared war on Poseidon and ordered his men to throw their spears into the ocean, after his failed invasion of Britain iirc
>>
File: 5555.png (418KB, 547x621px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
5555.png
418KB, 547x621px
>>38842
Hello Reddit!

>not realizing that there is more than one type of literature
I forgive you for being retarded.
It was true and Herodotus wrote about it to play up the majesty of the king.
You do realize that a man is measured by his enemies, if you demonize the persians then they fail to be worthy opposition.
First off use your brain
second off quite being a retard that hates the west

Even nature will bow to the King.
Doesn't that carry a far greater grandeur characteristic of Herodotus and the Greeks than
Persia bad, they dumb too.

Fucking retards ruining /his/ with their opinions.
>>
>>39250
You type like you're huffing glue
>>
>>36710
kek
>>
>>39250
really hope you're just a falseflag.
>>
>>35723
>>38842
This. If you know a bit about Xerxes and his achievements, you should also know he would hardly do something so completely irrational. The Persian emperor wasn't considered a god.
>>
>>35630
The first human settlers of America didn't actually come through the Bering straight
>>
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Molasses_Flood
>a wave of molasses rushed through the streets at an estimated 35 mph (56 km/h), killing 21 and injuring 150.
>for decades afterward residents claimed that on hot summer days the area still smelled of molasses


>>36803
forty keks
>>
>>35630
The population of the Americas reached its pre-Columbian size again only at the beginning of the 20th century.
>>
>>35630
Before WWII, pink was considered a manly colour associated with blood and masculinity, while blue was considered a feminine colour. Clothing for toddlers was either unisex or followed these conventions, the opposite of today.
>>
>>36421
>>36803
>>39016
That's amazing
>>
Paul Feyerabend was awarded an Iron Cross
>>
File: BrianBoru.jpg (480KB, 743x1024px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
BrianBoru.jpg
480KB, 743x1024px
Brian "The Big Guy" Boru refused to personally fight in the Battle of Clontarf, not because he was in his late 70s, but because he refused to bear arms on Good Friday
>>
On 26 September 1983,Stanislav Petrov, a lieutenant colonel in theSoviet Air Defense Forces, detected 5 ICBMs coming from the US to the Soviet Union. He suspected it was a computer malfunction and dismissed it as a false alarm. Had he notified his superiors, the Soviet Union's strategy was an immediate nuclear counter-attackthat would have initiated nuclear war. Petrov was later praised for his correct actions.
>>
>>35630
After Stalin died, a letter from Bukharin (prominent soviet leader Stalin had killed) was found in his desk begging Stalin to explain why he (Bukharin) had to die.
>>
>>40225
thanks anon, that's actually informative
>>
A big part of why Agincourt was a British victory was that when the armies closed for battle, the archers who ran out of ammo started running off to the sides and gangshanking the men-at-arms who they could separate from the mass. The men-at-arms were all mostly nobility, and had it in their head that proper glory in war was to be had fighting/dying against your own class, so these peasant archers (who were usually criminals or conscripts or just generally troglodytes) running up and stabbing knights 5-to-1 was a really low class way to go. This, combined with the cramped quarters of the main fight, led to panic on the part of the French army.
>>
File: people_collins.png (267KB, 300x450px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
people_collins.png
267KB, 300x450px
Irish general Michael Collins was 6'0" tall and built like a brick shithouse, earning him the nickname "The Big Fella", and making his friends the world's first Baneposters
>>
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Stewart_(DD-224)
>Later in the war, American pilots began reporting an American warship operating far within enemy waters. The ship had a Japanese trunked funnel but the lines of her four-piper hull were unmistakable. After almost a year under water, Stewart had been raised by the Japanese in February 1943 and commissioned into the Imperial Japanese Navy on 20 September 1943 as Patrol Boat No. 102.
>In an emotional ceremony on 29 October 1945, the ship was recommissioned in the United States Navy at Kure.
>>
>>35630
I like to imagine him, after the whipping, nodding and saying "Alright, that's done."
>>
>>40225
Until the late 19th century, boys as old as 8 would exclusively wear gowns or dresses. A boy receiving his first pair of pants was called breeching and was an important rite of passage for all boys in the western world.

The 17th-century French cleric and memoiristFrançois-Timoléon de Choisyis supposed to have been dressed in girl's clothes until he was eighteen.
>>
>>40530
>that expression

That's a look that says "Roight lads, we're winnin' this'n."
>>
Augustus was so well liked by the common people of Rome that when it was time to elect the two annual Consuls for the next year Augustus had the most votes even though he didn't run for the office. This happened for several years and Augustus would usually have to go to Rome to choose the second Consul that would've been him had he ran for the office.
>>
Rome wasnt built inna day ;)
>>
>On a dare from a contemporary, Ben Franklin once slapped George Washington on the back and said something along the lines of "How's it hangin'!?"

Washington gave him such shit eye that Franklin said he would never take that kind of dare on again.

>>40657
>Frenchmen wear dresses until 18

I thought we were talking about history?
>>
The Aztecs had a fun trading card game based on feathers and taking prisoners.

Capturing people alive granted different feathers depending on the tribe said prisoners were from, and you could only get a limited amount of feathers from one clan.
Taking 100 prisoners from a weak clan doesn't cut it, you have to move on to rarer prisoners to get the good feathers
>>
Nero tried to assassinate his mother by sabotaging her ship. When subtlety failed, he had her stabbed to death.
>>
>On a dare from a contemporary (possibly Ben Franjlin, who was a well known joker), Gouverneur Morris once slapped George Washington on the back at a dinner and said something along the lines of "How's it hangin'!?"

Washington gave him such shit eye that Morris said he would not do something like that again for a thousand dinners.

>>40657
>Frenchmen wear dresses until 18

I thought we were talking about history?
>>
>>40808
So did he do it again after 3 years?
>>
The Civil War was the war with the most American death, but nearly 2/3 of those deaths were the result of disease or improper medical care of wounded soldiers.

During the Civil War soldiers were given morphine to treat their wounds, but in many cases the morphine would run out before all the soldiers were treated so they would suffer in agony. One attending doctor decided to treat wounded soldiers with a simple saline solution that contained no painkillers and miraculously the soldiers treated with the saline solution reported lower levels of pain and suffering. This is the first well known case of a widely used placebo being used to treat patients.
>>
>>40888
Clover fucked up, can't delete the original.

So my error will stand, as a monument to my shame.
>>
>>36768
Jesus fuck you are dumb.

He was reworking old stories and myths in just the same way that the greek tragedians did.
>>
Kyoto was originally one of the targets to be nuked in WWII but the Secretary of War was a huge weeb and convinced Truman to take it off the list because of its cultural importance as the historical capital of Japan
>>
>>40770
Now that you talk about Aztecs. A slave would had costed you about 2,000 cacao beans. An Spanish real would cost 200 cacao beans, in in his place was 1/8 of Spanish peso.
>>
>>41066
Kyoto was designated to be firebombed, not nuked. Firebombs would still have completely destroyed Kyoto regardless however
>>
>>41172
It was also designated to be nuked
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-33755182
>>
>>35630
Port Royal, Jamaica was the most prosperous of all the settlements in the Americas before an earthquake in 1692 severly crippled it (with the aftermath of looting/pillaging and panicked fleeing being worse than the actual quake.)
>>
>>41235
Man the nips would have hated us forever if we destroyed Kyoto
>>
John Pollack, while at parties would get on his hands and knees and sniff women's crotches, and point out those who were menstruating.
>>
>>41295
Need a source for this so I can send it to other people
>>
>>41295
That can't be real
You got a source for that?
>>
>>41346
Wife heard it from a professor, she's looking it up now
>>
>>41295
Btw I misspelled pollock
>>
>>40966
>The Civil War was the war with the most American death, but nearly 2/3 of those deaths were the result of disease or improper medical care of wounded soldiers.
That happened in most war at that time. Many of the deaths in the Paraguayan War(1864-1870) were caused by cholera
>>
>>41399
>>41295
And he is Jackson not John
>>
>>36421

What about Peter the Great's Negro, Abram Gannibal, who was bought from the Ottomans as a slave and originated in Central Africa, near modern day Cameroon (he was probably Fulani or Hausa). He was freed and eventually became a nobleman, military engineer and general. Gannibal became a prominent member of Petere's daughter Elizabeth of Russia's court, rose to the rank of major-general, and became superintendent of Reval (now Tallinn, Estonia), a position he held from 1742 to 1752. He also married a Greek woman.

Alexander Pushkin was his descendent.
>>
>>35630
Leibniz read everything, spoke every language. When he heard about Spinoza writing the Ethics, he showed up at his front door and baited him into showing the manuscript, then promptly took a quantity of notes. When he left Spinoza's house, he went straight running to the church to denounce him.
>>
File: mystery.jpg (62KB, 720x421px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
mystery.jpg
62KB, 720x421px
>>35630
Some Nuragic bronze statuettes represent sub saharian animals like antilopes and chimps
>>
>>41432

best part is he got keked by a white man with his first marriage.
>>
>>39128
To make it better: He was also blind.
>>
>>36402
They were buddies when they were older though. Adams was being ironic.
>>
File: cagatio.jpg (89KB, 640x426px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
cagatio.jpg
89KB, 640x426px
Isaac Newton died a virgin in his sister's basement.
>Even if you discover a new type of math and explain a great mystery of the physical world, you will always be a NEET
>>
>>37020

They put him in windowless train so he couldn't poke his head out of the window and start a revolution when the train stopped at stations on its way from Switzerland to Finland
>>
>>41346
>>41357
OK, just asked my wife because I was having trouble finding the source. it is from one of his biographies

she cant remember the name of the book but it was mostly about his relationship with Clement Greenberg
>>
>>41235
>Kyoto was seen as an ideal target by the military because it had not been bombed at all, so many of the industries were relocated and some major factories were there
Sounds perfectly reasonable. It's not like they were terror bombing it for its cultural icon status.
>>
>>36649

>Aztecs
>human sacrafices

You're thinking of the Mayans.
>>
>>42069
I don't know if it's real, but I kek'd
>>
>>42321
No, they both did it. Though mayan nobility prefered auto-sacriface (which didn't involve dying, but did involve piercing your dick).
>>
>>40657
my father's family still practised this for no reason
>>
Mahomet's corpse had a boner.
>>
>>42188
I don't think any informed person would try to say it was an unreasonable target, but just imagine what would have been lost had it been destroyed, and the future implications. Japan took to US rule incredibly well after the war, and as a result they became one of the strongest nations in the world. Post-war Japan's military is it's best kept secret from retards. Would any of this have happened if America destroyed Kyoto and they resented us for it?

Most of this is hindsight, of course. What I'm really trying to say is that bombing Kyoto is a fun "what if" scenario.
>>
During the Gallic Wars, there was an incident where Roman soldiers given explicit orders to raid an enemy supply wagon and NOT besiege a settlement decided to go balls out and immediately besiege a nearby settlement. The Gaul women started throwing pots, furniture, even children at the Romans to get them to fuck off. The commotion alerted Vercingetorix and his warband, who promptly secured the supply wagon the Romans were supposed to burn and then immediately turned to rout the Romans at the gates. 20-some centurions or something ended up making a last stand so that the rest of the Roman soldiers to run back to Caesar's camp.
>>
Prestor John was a mythical Christian king thought by the europeans to rule over the far east until the 17th century, originally India, then Ethiopia. The tales about him are very interesting, much like king Solomon or something. When Europeans did find the ethiopian christians, they were appalled that they werent catholic.
>>
File: 1446397971551.jpg (33KB, 264x489px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1446397971551.jpg
33KB, 264x489px
>>35630
>mfw
>>
>>42340

>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sealed_train

> The most notable use of a sealed train was the return of Vladimir Lenin to Russia from exile in Switzerland in 1917, but the practice was used a number of times throughout the 20th century to allow the migration or transport of controversial individuals or peoples.

>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_Lenin

>Recognising that these dissidents could cause problems for their Russian enemies, the German government agreed to permit 32 Russian citizens to travel in a train carriage through their territory, among them Lenin and his wife.[119] The group traveled by train from Zurich to Sassnitz, proceeding by ferry to Trelleborg, Sweden, and from there to Helsinki, Finland, before taking the final train to Petrograd.[120]

The reason they sealed the train was that he could not rile up the masses at the stations he stopped at.
>>
>>42683
"No my King of kings and light of Aryans, I'm not whipping the fucking Hellespont, that's retarded!"
>>
>>36803
I mean, you gotta give it to him - he had TWO TRAINS LITERALLY COLLIDE. Just for the sake of spectacle. For the splosions. And to top it off it was free for the public. How cool is that???

>Crush was immediately fired from the Katy railroad. In light of a lack of negative publicity, however, he was rehired the next day.
Jesus christ this was a good read.
>>
>>42321
>>Aztecs
>>human sacrafices
This was a defining feature of their entire culture. They enslaved entire tribes just so they could keep up with the thousands of yearly sacrifices in Tenochtitlan.
>>
>>36768
don't forget romeus and juliet was basically a copy of pyramus and thisbe
>>
File: latest[1].jpg (196KB, 1280x1024px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
latest[1].jpg
196KB, 1280x1024px
When the Soviet Pe-8 heavy bomber had its baptism of fire on the 10th of August in 1941, due to a navigational error and the ACh-30 engines being plagued by mechanical failures, one of these behemoths had to land on a field long before their home airport.

Fortunately, a local collective farm had a diesel storage - the same fuel the Pe-8's engine used. However, the only method of getting the precious liquid to the aircraft was a modest bucket, thus refueling almost took two days.

Nevertheless, when it was finally done, the Pe-8 took off and made it back to the base. The regiment already had written the aircraft off, and when the lost son returned a big party with lots of vodka was had that night.
>>
Cleopatra lived closer to our time than the construction of the piramids
>>
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Crater#Battle

During the Union's siege of Petersburg in the American Civil War, Union troops managed to literally blow a massive hole in the Confederate defenses after packing a mine running under their trenches full of gunpowder and detonating it. They still managed to lose the battle, however, because confusion in the Union ranks caused the troops to fail to press the assault immediately and, infamously, charge directly into the bottom of the crater instead of around it.

The siege of Petersburg wound up lasting another eight months.
>>
>>44190
Normies always get astonished as fuck when I tell them that. They literally can't understand it until you make them do the math.
>>
>>42321
>taking Apocalypto for gospel

Jan Zizka (pic related) pioneered the concept of armored fighting vehicles with his wagon forts, successfully defeating two Catholic crusades of mercenaries with essentially farm implements and primitive guns. He was never defeated in battle and when he finally died legend has it his last wish was for his skin to be made into drums so he could continue leading his armies beyond the grave.
>>
File: cm.jpg (173KB, 1282x1808px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
cm.jpg
173KB, 1282x1808px
The name "Brit" referring to an inhabitant of Britain is derived from the Roman "Britanni", which in turn is a Romanisation of the Greek "Pretanike", which in turn is the Greek form of what the inhabitants supposedly called themselves: "Pretani". This Greek form comes to us from a man named Pythias of Massilia who visited GB and spoke to the locals. However, celtic languages can be broadly classified into the "P" and the "Q" families. Pythias must have only spoken to P Celts; had he spoken to Q Celts, they would have described themselves as "Qureteni" or perhaps "Qurtani". This in turn might have been turned into a Greek form "Kruthenike" (or something like it), which in turn would have become Roman "Cruteni".

Thus we would have called it the Cruttish Isles, the Cruttish language, Great Cruthain etc

source
>The Isles: A History by Davies, Norman (2008)
>>
>>44828
That's a nice fact, and I like the trend of providing sources for what we post.
>>
>>42380
Mayans did do human sacrifice, why do you the think Chichen Itza stairs are so narrow?
>>
>>44948
Do you have difficulty with reading comprehension, anon said they BOTH did it. The Maya never came close to the industrial scale sacrifice of the Aztecs and had different practices and beliefs.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_sacrifice_in_Maya_culture
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_sacrifice_in_Aztec_culture
>>
>>45141
He said the Mayans practice sacrifice but only though blood letting.

>During the Postclassic period (c. 900-1524) the most common form of human sacrifice was heart extraction, influenced by the method used by the Aztecs in the Valley of Mexico
>>
>>36649
well you could always use the blunt side
>>
>>45214
He said they preferred it, not that they didn't also perform it.
>>
ancient Greeks and Romans where giant faggots who loved taking it in the ass
>>
Caesar did some cool stuff with pirates.
>>
>>35630
Norway lost the battle of Stamford Bridge by not following one of the prime laws of the Northmen; to never leave your sword.
>>
File: Egyptian chariot I.jpg (150KB, 820x541px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Egyptian chariot I.jpg
150KB, 820x541px
the earliest battle in recorded history for which details of tactics and formations was in 1274 BC
this was also assumed to be the largest chariot battle ever with over 6000 chariots

the battle of kadesh between the hittite empire and the egyptian empire
>>
>>45524
Didn't they just leave their armor behind though?
>>
>>45558
>for wich details of tactics and formations where known*

sorry bout that
>>
>>45558
Megiddo predates Kadesh by a couple hundred years, though Kadesh does have somewhat more detail available to us.
>>
File: Queen2650.jpg (104KB, 650x434px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Queen2650.jpg
104KB, 650x434px
When Gráinne Ní Mháille (Grace O'Malley in English) conducted her meeting with Elizabeth I of England, the two women had to speak to each other in Latin, as Gráinne spoke no English and Elizabeth spoke no Irish
>>
>>39250
>I remember yesterday, back when this board wasn't shit
>>
>>44754
Funny thing: Joan d'Arc hated the guts of Zizka and company. She goes as far as comparing the hussites with muslims.

http://archive.joan-of-arc.org/joanofarc_letter_march_23_1430.html

>>45214
No, I didn't say that. I literally said >>45141 though with a more relaxed and maybe less clear tone than this anon who explained it to you.
>>
>>45919
Wasn't that pretty common back then? Sometimes but not often with french instead of latin.
>>
>>40378
>"The Big Guy"
>>
File: Gaul481.jpg (369KB, 651x600px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Gaul481.jpg
369KB, 651x600px
Romulus Augustulus' dethronement was not the total end of Roman government within the former Western Roman Empire. A couple provinces maintained Roman rule for some years after the advent of Odoacer.

Notably, northern France was ruled by Aegidius and then Syagrius, two Romans who insisted they were just governors of a province and ruled from what's now the city of Soissons. They managed to govern northern France for another ten years after the fall of the Western Roman Empire, and then the Franks came along, beat up Soissons and took it over.


And then, of course, a century later the Eastern Roman Empire under Justinian managed to retake most of the Mediterranean and restore Roman rule to points as far away as southern Spain, but that's more an expansion of ERE rule rather than a direct continuation of WRE governance after the fall of the WRE itself.
>>
>>46077
Heh I didn't know that.
>>
>>46327
Also Romulus Augustus wasn't the rightful emperor of the West, but a half-germanic usurper. The rightful one was Julius Nepos, who ruled in Dalmacia as the rightful (though not factual) emperor of the west until 480, when he was assasinated and his land invaded by Odoacer.
>>
File: 1433155579117.jpg (1MB, 1800x1050px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1433155579117.jpg
1MB, 1800x1050px
>>36710
How many Christians must die until you support lion control?
>>
>>46724
>Also Romulus Augustus wasn't the rightful emperor of the West, but a half-germanic usurper.

Eh, "rightful" is a nebulous thing when it comes to the Romans, since they never really established a firm law of succession for the emperors. There were some traditions which were fairly persistent, like the Senate doing that really long hailing thing they did (chanting slogans several times over, praising the emperor, etc.), which carried on even into the reigns of the Ostrogothic kings, but the only vaguely reliable rule regarding what made a guy the legitimate ruler was whoever manage to beat up everyone else.
>>
>>37390
>>37441
Wasn't the reason he was caught that the armor he was wearing was so heavy that he collapsed from exhaustion?
>>
>>46724
>julius nepos
>respecting the rule of an emperor who ran like a baby when orestes shouted too loud
at least the 12 year old kid managed to stay on the peninsula
>>
>>41810
>"Where should we lead the charge, my lord?"
"THAT WAY!"
>"That's a cliff..."
"SHIET!"
>>
>>47047
>>47065

Well yeah, re-reading my post it sounds like I was som kind of Nepos fanboy (does that even exist?). I was just further nuancing the supposed "fall" of western Rome in 476.
>>
>>41810
Was he the one who had his eyes poked out by the Byzantines during his youth?
>>
>>47174
>it sounds like I was som kind of Nepos fanboy (does that even exist?)

Anything that can be used to extend the lifetime of the Romans is something that Romaboos will readily rally around.
>>
>>35630

Hitler skipped out on war meetings to watch movies
>>
>>47174
youd be surprised at how many people like to make the case for nepos so they can add another four years onto the lifespan of w. rome
>>
>>47265
Adolf Hitler loved Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

He was also a NEET from age 16 until his early 20's.
>Lived with his sick mother after dropping out of high school, bumming money off of her to go to operas.
>Moves to Vienna with another young man who was his roommate, still on mom's money. She dies, then he bums off his roomy, who was now his friend.
>Considered himself too good to get a job. Spent free time doing art, traveling the city and going to the opera.
>Got screaming-angry if anyone criticized his art or his lifestyle.
>Spent some time in a poor house after going homeless, where he learned antisemitism.

Really interesting internet article. Forgot which one it was, though.
>>
>>46024
I remember when this board had flags
>>
In the 1400s the Ottoman empire began introducing massive siege cannons to their armies, and they were useful in battles like the fall of Constantinople in 1453.

As time passed, a set of these huge-ass guns were left gathering dust at a fort in the Dardanelles.

They sat there for over 300 years.

Then, in 1806, a british Naval fleet showed up to try and force the Turks to bend to their will. The fort defenders, spotting the British fleet coming into range, looked at the ancient cannons and thought "why not?" and stuffed them full of schrapnel.

The guns still worked, and managed to kill a few sailors. Good engineering on the part of the Ottoman Empire.
>>
>>47560
>Good engineering on the part of the Ottoman Empire.

The guy who made the gun that helped take Constantinople in 1453 was a Hungarian or German, though.
>>
>>47635

An empire isn't a race, it's an organization.
>>
>>47635
the dardanelles gun wasnt though
>>
Portugal and Persia had a war in the 16th century.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persian%E2%80%93Portuguese_war
>>
File: 1443370035346.jpg (392KB, 2242x1320px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1443370035346.jpg
392KB, 2242x1320px
>>47453
Related to Hitler, from "The Young Hitler I Knew"
>>
>>36040
Herodotus just reported what he heard from people, and acknowledged that a lot of it was probably bullshit.
>>
>>44190
No shit lol she was fucking Marc Antony and the Romans came after them.
>>
>>47453

And yet he managed to become the most powerful man in the world

What have you done with your life fuccboi?
>>
>>45561
Yeah, which is their number one rule: to NEVER leave their armour behind.
>>
File: 1436895906247.jpg (45KB, 495x482px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1436895906247.jpg
45KB, 495x482px
The French army at Agincourt had longbow archers in it.

The cannon predates plate armor

Quite a few world conquering armies rode ponies
>>
>>47959

He had little to no power outside of central Europe.
>>
>>48038
Horse riding riflemen is my fetish.
>>
>>48843
>>
>>35630
my great grandfather was kommandt stadt of hamburg as an american colonel after WW2. get fucked thats interesting
>>
>>47835
I'm literally worse than Hitler
>>
>>49532
Most of us are, Anon.
>>
>>47453
The book by his roommate describing him at the time is incredible. It will make any regular 4chan poster relate hard with Hitler, /pol/ or not.
>>
>>36803
MADMAN
>>
>>36321
w2c that middle fit?
he lookin gucci w/ that wizard hat desu

sorry for the shitpost
>>
>>38222
its called the thingy today kek
>>
>>35902
>Sobieski

BASED
>>
>>36803

>Iwantoffthisride.jpg
>>
>>40459

Doubt it.
>>
>>50263
retard
>>
>>50263
>>50341
the jannies and mods are suppressing us and have continued to make threads autosage for absolutely no reason
>>
File: 1404154007958.gif (2MB, 320x200px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1404154007958.gif
2MB, 320x200px
>>35630
Alexander the Great destroyed centuries worth of Persian records and culture because he and his men got really fucking drunk and had the greatest party in history (or rather, burned Persepolis to the fucking ground while hammered))
>>
The ancient Chinese believed mercury to have supernatural properties, including extending one's life. One Chinese emperor, Qin Shi Huang, had rivers of mercury flowing through his tomb.
>>
>>50643
Didn't the first Emperor of China on his quest to becoming immortal ingest a whole lot of mercury which ended up killing him?
>>
>>50643
read the thread fag boy someone already said it and it was way more interesting than your post
>>
>>47226
I guess that explains the saltiness of 1204
>>
>>46077
Aztecsdontdohumansacrifice fag on suicide watch
>>
>>37238
This after the terrible campaign in North Africa right. Some incompetent dumbass lead the army of like 150k to be routed by a visor other force of under 30k
>>
>>48038
Timur Leng had elephant mounted with cannons in his army
>>
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emperor_Norton
>>
>>51815
a link isnt a fact
>>
http://thumbs.media.smithsonianmag.com//filer/pink-and-blue-Franklin-Roosevelt-2.jpg__600x0_q85_upscale.jpg

Here's a picture of FDR wearing a dress.
>>
http://thumbs.media.smithsonianmag.com//filer/pink-and-blue-Franklin-Roosevelt-2.jpg__600x0_q85_upscale.jpg

Here's a picture of FDR wearing a gown as a child.
>>
For a brief period during WWII Bulgaria was at war with both sides.
>>
>>36318
It was actually five hours earlier.

Still, that's incredibly interesting. Thanks.
>>
>>47453
Fuck man maybe I could be Hitler
>>
>>40808
Even funnier because Morris had a fucked up necrotic arm
>>
>>36768
Thats a bit of an over simplification. It was the equivalent of remakes in today's society. Certain plays, te merchant of Venice or King Lear, and those you listed were stories that were frequently told and retold. So the whole appeal was that you were going to see Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet, or Shakespeares Jew of Malta. So on and so forth. His best plays were his histories anyways.
>>
>>50509
When he was wasted, Alexander also threw a javelin at Cleitus the Black, who saved the king's life at the battle at Granicus. Apparently Alexander claimed that he was better than his father, and Cleitus told him that he was nothing without his father's achievements. He also seemed disillusioned with Alexander's adoption of Persian customs.
>>
File: beach and chill.jpg (398KB, 1600x1478px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
beach and chill.jpg
398KB, 1600x1478px
Einstein frequently go to beach to chill with his bros on slippers
>>
File: keksfrog.jpg (17KB, 216x209px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
keksfrog.jpg
17KB, 216x209px
>>39986
How the fuck does that even happen?

>Fairy Godmother: Now, little child, tell me your single greatest wish and I shall grant it!
>Child: Wel', I s'pose I'd like an ocean of molasses! My mama always sa'd I gawt a sweet tooth n' all.
>Fairy Godmother: ͔̘͍̝̱̹͖Y͇̲̰̩͉ͨ̎͊͑͠O̙͚̺̭͓͐͒́͒ͬȖ̳͚̍ͩŖ̥̬̅̊̾͛̚ ̨̭͉̪̟̠͔ͧ̀ͯͬW̨̘̱̫̮ͨͅI̟̞ͬ̿̃̎S̘̥̬̪̰̝H̷͕̜̳͎͉̚ ̹͍̟̞̻̏I̼̯ͩͤ̾ͥ̋͝Ṣ̭̤̟̃ͩ̔ͣ͒̕ ͚͌͟ͅG͉̪͈̲̮͉̅ͣͯ͐̉R̠̾A̷̝͉̫͉͙͎̲ͫͭͮN͉̳̯̭͐͞ͅT̳̾̓͝Ȅ̷̟̗̝̦̘͔̠ͮͭ̈́̚D̴̞̝̗̳͙̦͊̅̚
>>
>>47453
More fun facts about Hitler

>had a strict diet, and would have maids leave pies out on the counter at night for secret midnight snacks

>would sneak out with his Butler to go to the Opera
>>
>>40459
>Agincourt was a British victory
English victory
>>
>>42823
>Silly Lenin, you have to wait until you reach Russia to start a revolution
>>
>>40459
>peasant archers
Longbowmen were yeomen, son. That means they had to won land. Plus it took years of training to be able to fire effectively.
>>
>>53459
*own
>>
>>42018
He was actually proud of this fact.
>>
>>36883
No one has actually opened the tomb yet. It's believed that if they open it the now gaseous mercury would explode out of the tomb and into the city it lies in killing thousands of people.
>>
>>39822
From where then, genuinely interested
>>
>>38222
That applies to all pre-christian germanic tribes
>>
>>35902
>John III feeds the troll
sounds like an idiot
>>
File: 47298.jpg (24KB, 320x396px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
47298.jpg
24KB, 320x396px
>>36074
The phoenicians circumnavigated africa before founding carthage, becoming the first civilization to do so.
>>
Legend has it that the founders of Rome, Romulus and Remus were descended from the Trojan hero Aeneas, who fled from Asia Minor following the conquest of Troy by the Mycenaean Greeks.

Though this is likely a case of grasping at mythical straws, there's speculation that early Rome's neighbors/overlords to northwest, the Etruscans, who did not speak an Indo-European language, may have been descended from ancient Aegean migrants to Italy.

Seems more likely to me, though, that the founders of that Etruria were settlers who arrived from around the north, given that there was apparently a large patch of alpine peoples who spoke a related language not to far away.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etruscan_language#Geographic_distribution
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyrsenian_languages

This thread makes me hopeful. I expect most of /his/ will match this quality before the year's end.
>>
File: greatzim.jpg (17KB, 236x177px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
greatzim.jpg
17KB, 236x177px
It is estimated that 20 000 people resided in the (now ruinous) city known as "Great Zimbabwe"
>>
>>36421
>Peter also gave Frederick William I a bunch of exceptionally tall soldiers in trade for an amber cabinet.

Frederick William I was obsessed with tall soldiers. He searched high and low all over Europe for freakishly tall men to fill his special grenadier regiment, the "Potsdam Giants." If they wouldn't go willingly they'd be threatened or kidnapped.

Frederick liked to have parties with his grenadiers and dance with them. (no homo)
>>
>>58051
OP here.
thanks for the support friendo. I just hope that the mods can keep up.
>>
>>40378
>Brian "The Big Guy" Boru refused to personally fight in the Battle of Clontarf, not because he was in his late 70s, but because he refused to bear arms on Good Friday

According the legend, Brodar the Dane escaped from the Viking defeat at Clontarf and found Brian Boru praying in his tent. Broder killed Brian but was apprehended by the Gaelic warrior Wolf the Quarrelsome. Wolf killed Brodar by cutting out Brodar's intestine, tying it to a tree and forcing the man to walk around it, unwinding his guts, until he died.
>>
>>43900
Yeah, he even has that play in A Midsummer Night's Dream.
>>
>>45919
>When Gráinne Ní Mháille (Grace O'Malley in English) conducted her meeting with Elizabeth I of England, the two women had to speak to each other in Latin, as Gráinne spoke no English and Elizabeth spoke no Irish

When the Duke of Wellington and Field Marshal Blucher met at an inn after defeating Napoleon at Waterloo, they spoke French to each other. Also, the inn was ironically named "La Belle Alliance."
>>
>>46077
>Funny thing: Joan d'Arc hated the guts of Zizka and company. She goes as far as comparing the hussites with muslims.

Sometimes I never make the connection that certain people lived in the same time.
>>
There was a government-sponsored culling of emus in Australia in the 1930s, as they were destroying farmlands and such. The campaign was basically a failure and a bounty system was instated instead.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_War
>>
>>42018
I guess he didnt have enough mass or acceleration :^)
>>
>>58997
Of course I see that somebody made a thread on this exact topic immediately after posting this.
>>
>>41066

He (Sec. of War Stimson) also honeymooned in Kyoto. He was also solely responsible for its removal from the Interim Committee targeting list. Thus, it seems that a honeymoon saved the city.

He argued at the time that it needed to be saved since it was a religious center, akin to nuking Jerusalem.
>>
>>42670
Prestor John was a lot of people, if you think about it. I do like the theory that Prestor John is actually Genghis Khan.
>>
File: Fire Emblem.jpg (30KB, 460x397px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Fire Emblem.jpg
30KB, 460x397px
>>35630
I actually have a relevant picture.
>>
>>40966
ww1 was the first war in human history where more soldiers died from combat than from disease or starvation
>>
In 1852, John Murray Spear tried to build a robot messiah he called the New Motive Power. He did this because he claimed to have talked to the ghosts of Ben Franklin, Ben Rush, John Quincy Adams, Thomas Jefferson and John Murray.

It has since been my life goal to tell people this story.
>>
>>35630
English is a Germanic language. This flies in the face of all of the other migration period peoples who were assimilated into the language family of the area that they conquered i.e. The Salian Franks' language eventually becomes French, the Lombards beget Italian and the Visigoths wind up speaking Spanish years down the road. All of these are Romantic languages even though they were conquered by (presumably) Germanic people's.

This is because the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Frisians ethnically cleansed the Britons. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle makes mention of entire Welsh towns being put to the sword.

>A.D. 607. This year Ceolwulf fought with the South-Saxons. And Ethelfrith led his army to Chester; where he slew an innumerable host of the Welsh; and so was fulfilled the prophecy of Augustine, wherein he saith "If the Welsh will not have peace with us, they shall perish at the hands of the Saxons." There were also slain two hundred priests, (18) who came thither to pray for the army of the Welsh. Their leader was called Brocmail, who with some fifty men escaped thence.
>A.D. 614. This year Cynegils and Cwichelm fought at Bampton, and slew two thousand and forty-six of the Welsh.
>http://avalon.law.yale.edu/medieval/ang07.asp
>>
Carlota of Mexico is the only woman known to have spent the night in the vatican
>>
Babe Ruth stole home 10 times in his career
>>
>>60070
Hengest and Horsa did literally nothing wrong.
>>
>>58822
That's pretty fucking brutal.
>>
The mongolian empire was not only the largest contiguous land empire in history, it was also the first nation in history to have a national postal service. It used horse riders and relay stations, and the pony express of 1800s America was based off of this system.

Also. Even though the mongols were the largest contiguous empire in history. The largest in terms of Sq kms controlled was the British empire. At the height of British colonialism they controlled approx. 1/3 the planet, with territories in all time zones. Thus spawning the phrase: the sun never sets on the British empire
>>
>>35630
Some historians think that Ivar the Boneless (son of Ragnar Lodbruk) was carried out in to battle on shields, because the fucker couldn't walk, either from brittle-bone disease or deformed legs.
>>
File: Hongxiuquan.jpg (13KB, 282x250px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Hongxiuquan.jpg
13KB, 282x250px
The Roman Empire and Chinese Empire were vaguely aware of each other due to the Silk Road and repeatedly attempted to establish contact as early as 97 BCE. Allegedly, a (claimed) Roman emissary did make it to China in 166 CE but there's little evidence to suggest much came of it.

Also China related - The Taiping Uprising. The short of it is a guy called Hong Xiuquan shows up in the mid 1800s claiming to be the brother of Jesus Christ and attempts to establish a "Heavenly Kingdom". The following conflict lasted nearly 15 years with a death toll of at least 20 million.
>>
>>48998
>>48038
These horses seem....very small. Give me a Pecheron any day.
>>
>>46928
All of them.
>>
>>60435
>Allegedly, a (claimed) Roman emissary did make it to China in 166 CE but there's little evidence to suggest much came of it.

Poor guy probably drowned in pussy
>>
>>60435
China in the 19th and early 20th century was full JUST mode. The last empress was a junkie that died in a pool of her own piss and vomit.

I actually think they might have been better off if the Heavenly Kingdom won
>>
>>60435
>BCE
into the trash your entire opinion goes.

Tell me, whats "common" about year 1 to 2015? Why was year 1, year 1 in "common era?

For being a history and humanities board, these issues need to be addressed.
>>
>>60589
Because it was the year Jesus turned 4 or 6?
>>
File: pmpm[1].jpg (49KB, 543x380px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
pmpm[1].jpg
49KB, 543x380px
Some Mayan warrior went into battle dressed up like a lobster

he probably gave 'em the clamps
>>
File: lakshmana-temple-2.jpg (3MB, 3872x2592px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
lakshmana-temple-2.jpg
3MB, 3872x2592px
of all the cultures in history India takes the cake in terms of sexual deviance.
>>
>>47453
He also stalked a girl, gave her an anonymouse letter even

When she found out about it many years after he died she said she didn't even notice him but that it explained where that weird letter came from.
>>
>>60070

The Anglo-Saxon chronicle is completely unreliable during that time period, since it was first recorded in the ninth century. Alfred the Great of Wessex is almost certainly the king who ordered it to be written. The entire section on the fifth century is basically an origin myth.

Bede's Ecclesiastical History is a better source for early Anglo-Saxon England, but it's biased as hell. You could also try Gildas, who was a Briton.
>>
>>60589

>Hurr durr, anyone who doesn't apply my naming convention for the exact same timeline is trash
>Even though the majority of academic institutions use CE/BCE
>>
>>61016
Bede's account seems to dove tail with this.

>ETHELFRID, KING OF THE NORTHUMBRIANS, HAVING VANQUISHED THE NATIONS OF THE SCOTS, EXPELS THEM FROM THE TERRITORIES OF THE ENGLlSH. [A.D. 603.]

AT this time, Ethelfrid, a most worthy king, and ambitious of glory, governed the kingdom of the Northumbrians, and ravaged the Britons more than all the great men of the English, insomuch that he might be compared to Saul, once king of the Israelites, excepting only this, that he was ignorant of the true religion. For he conquered more territories from the Britons, either making them tributary, or driving the inhabitants clean out, and planting English in their places, than any other king or tribune.
>http://legacy.fordham.edu/halsall/basis/bede-book1.asp

As an undergrad, I wrote about this topic for my seminar. As an aside, Bede didn't live during these events either.
>>
>>61240

The inhabitants of England are genetically most related to the other inhabitants of the Isles, with Germanic admixture from both the Danelaw and the Saxon migrations.

That doesn't really fit the ethnic cleansing narrative.
>>
>>61580
probably because it happened fourteen hundred years ago and stopped thirteen hundred years or so ago. Ethnic cleansing is a distinct practice from genocide because the goal of the killing is not to wipe out the original inhabitants but to convince them to get the fuck out of dodge. Additionally, you could become an angle or a saxon but until then, you were a second class citizen.

And again, there's the matter of the English Language not being assimilated into another language family.
>>
>>61798

Are you saying that the Saxons practiced widespread cleansing of the Britons across the entirety of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, or that they established Anglo-Saxon regions within mostly Celtic/Romano-British land?
>>
>>60589

Whoah.
You will get a hard time with C14 datation systems then.
>>
>>58051
Yeah it's bs, etruscans were genetically similar to southern germans of the time
>>
File: seeds.jpg (31KB, 791x250px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
seeds.jpg
31KB, 791x250px
>>35630
Melons and mulberries were not first brought to western Europe by the Romans but by Nuragic Sardinians around 1300 bc:
Da: Diego Sabato , Alessia Masi , Caterina Pepe, Mariano Ucchesu, Leonor Peña-Chocarro, Alessandro Usai, Gianna Giachi, Chiara Capretti, Gianluigi Bacchetta, Archaeobotanical analysis of a Bronze Age well from Sardinia: A wealth of knowledge, Plant Biosystems, 2014, DOI:10.1080/11263504.2014.998313.

Abstract. In 2008, during a rescue excavation in the Sa Osa area, near the town of Cabras (Sardinia, Italy), a Nuragic settlement was discovered. The excavation revealed numerous pits, wells and structures dug by the local communities between the Early Copper Age and the Iron Age. These structures were interpreted as elements of a settlement mainly involved in primary production. The most remarkable structure is Well-N, radiocarbon and archaeologically dated to the Late Bronze Age (fig. 1), which has yielded large amounts of waterlogged plant remains, animal and fish bones and pottery. Despite the limited set of samples, the combination of macro-remain and pollen analyses in this unique context provides important information useful for exploring not only local subsistence systems but also human impact on the surrounding environment.

Grapes and figs are the most abundant remains together with other fruits and edible vascular plants. Remains of melon and mulberry were identified being the earliest remains of these two species for Western Europe. Their presence may confirm early trade between Nuragic people and the eastern Mediterranean and/or African coasts. Intentional selection of wood suggests practices associated to the collection of raw material for specific technological demands. The presence of intestinal parasites in the pollen record points to the possible use of the well as a cesspit, at least in its later use, and this is one of the earliest evidence of this type of structures in prehistoric contexts.
>>
Treeing was a ritualistic execution of high ranking prisoner by making a small incision in the abdomen and removing a short length of intestine to nail to a tree. The prisoner was them forced with spear points to circle the tree so that his guts wrapped around it again and again, like a grisly maypole.
>>
>>61884
In a manner, Both. Evidence suggests that they kicked the Britons into the western Hinterlands. Not thoroughly but enough for Mercia, Wessex, Sussex etc to become majority Germanic. Thirteen hundred years of gene flow later, it's gotten shuffled back in because let's face it. We're all mongrels.
>>
>>61884
>(cont.)
And also, one of the sources that you suggested says that as well.
>>
>>58051
Trojan war was supposedly 10,000 BC says homer

It likely was a tiny mud hut skirmish that became mythical over the ages
>>
File: ridin dirty.png (832KB, 749x805px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
ridin dirty.png
832KB, 749x805px
>>60485
And what happens in day five when it floundered or is starving?
>>
King John of England is said to have had a Frenchmen in his retinue known as Peter the Farter. Peter's claim to fame, indeed, his only apparent use in the King's court, was his ability to pass gas to the tune of hymns and Christmas carols.
>>
>>36040
>Herodotus
>father of lies
fight me you fucking coward
Xenophon and Herodotus were the twin fathers of history
>>
>>48163
>Why aren't you as powerful as hitler?
>It's not really that impressive...
Are you being serious right now
>>
When a bunch of Dutch sailors shipwrecked in Australia in 1629, they built a small stone fort, the oldest stone structure in Australia.
The remains of it are still visible.
>>
The Japanese liked to take heads as proof of their kills, but during their invasions of Korea in 1590s they were not able to ship the heads back to Japan and instead sliced off noses. Today there are still shrines throughout Japan where these noses are enshrined.
>>
>>64295
That sounds like bullshit, how the fuck would you cut the nose off an Asian?
>>
>>61986
I thought those were preserved castration at first
>>
>>60435
Reminds me of a particular pot found in an archaeological dig in South America. The pot was the only one of it's kind in the grave site (I believe it was a grave) and has a sculptured face that looks so much like classic Roman art it's uncanny. Some people think the pot is proof of contact between the Roman empire and certain civilizations in Southern America.
>>
one of the Prominent attendees of the Council of Nicea (famous for solidifying the first Biblical canon) was St. Nicholas himself. At the council St. Nicholas was said to get so heated in debate with the heretic Arius that he struck him right in the face.

This means that there's historical precedent for Santa clobbering that asswipe in "Miracle on 34th Street"
>>
There was a Korean who served in the armies of Imperial Japan, the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany before being taken POW at Utah beach after the D-day landings. He's the only known person to have served in all three main theatres of the second world war.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yang_Kyoungjong
>>
>>44190
correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't she alive 2000 years ago and the pyramids were 3000 years ago? or were the pyramids 3000 bc?
>>
>>49358
my great grandfather was a squad leader in the spearhead tank division in WW2. His tank was the first foreign invader on German soil since Napoleon
>>
>>64703
The pyramid of Khufu was completed around 2570 BC. Cleopatra lived 69 BC - 30 BC. So it's about 2500 years from the pyramids to her, and about 2050 years from us to Cleopatra.
Some pyramids were built later than Khufu's - the last Egyptian ones were built around 1750 BC. There was also a pyramid-building movement in Nubia(the area south of Egypt) during the 25th dynasty around 700 BC, which ruled both Kush in Nubia and Egypt(and are incidentally the main cause of the WE WUZ KINGS meme)
>>
>>56843
Neat. I Always liked the phoenicians.
>>
Germany, as in the country called Germany, has only existed since 1871.

Germany has never won a war.
>>
>>62750
then mind explaining how they actually found Troy?
>>
>>64785
fucking dope. thanks.
>>
>>64876
If you consider the German Empire as existing since 1871 then it has won the Franco-Prussian War.
>>
>>64900
err, rather 'if you consider the German Empire as Germany and hence existing since 1871' since quite obviously the empire did exist since then
>>
>>64881
They haven't every 20 or so years they "find" troy which gets media attention, this gets them money, then 6 months later they find something that actually gives the place a label and they retract their statement but since that isn't as "cool"nobody reports the retraction
>>
>>36040
Herodotus was the first person that recorded history, so fuck off.
The problem with him is that he wrote down everything he heard from people. He did a lot of research but he didn't filter it, he just wrote down all the rumours he heard.

Thucydides was a better historian because he did some actual source checking, although in his quest to be completely objective he made some stuff up. It is known that most of the speeches in his work attributed to important characters of that time were products of thucydides's "imagination" (but they were still based on facts and common sense).
>>
>>64900
Winning the Franco Prussian war directly led to the unification of Germany (it didn't look like the picture anon posted).

It's sort of like arguing the War of Independence doesn't "count" as a victory for the United States
>>
>>65056
yeah but they both count
>>
>>54550
Now that's some well-planned dungeon for a lich.
>>
>>62750
No, it was in 1100 bc.
>>
>>60518
Fuck, I always wish I could have travelled from Rome to China, bringing with me as much classic philosophy as possible.
>>
>>64949
That's untrue and you're full of crap.
>>
Ottoman Sultans had harems with the most beautiful women he could find. These harems need people to service women, wash them, carry their shit etc.

The work at the harem thus required men, but men surrounded by amazingly beautiful women usually want to fuck, especially when these men wash these women. Thus, the men who worked there were castrated.

But due to the shit medicine at the time, the sultans didn't trust that castration would work 100% of the time. There needed to be a way to discover if the eunuchs fucked the prized posessions of the sultan.

The solution: black eunuchs. If the eunuchs ever fucked women, there would be a certain way to know that by the color of the child's skin. With a turk/arab/white eunuch there would be no way of knowing if they fucked with the woman.

Thus, keking actually has some benefits, especially if you want to preserve your harem ;^)
>>
>>65163
Germany wasn't declared until the conclusion of the war. That's why it's the Franco Prussian war and not the Franco German war.
>>
>>65912
Fair enough then
>>
>>65858

Are you referring to troy viia?
because the only evidence they have of it being "troy" is that the civilization ended in bloodshed and is roughly during a time that Greece could have waged war on that region

By that account, Hiroshima and Nagasaki were wiped out by the Russians, because they experienced atomic bombs, and they ended roughly when the ussr acquired atomic bombs
>>
>>65894
Cut a man's balls off and he can still fuck, but there will be no baby and thus no way to know whether the guard fucked one of the women. Cut his dick and balls off, and he won't be able to fuck and get a baby.
That story is bullshit, just cut the entire manhood off and your harem guard is harmless.
>>
>>36321
E-even sharper than grorious Nippon steel folded over 1000 times?
>>
File: happyphoenician.png (25KB, 580x692px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
happyphoenician.png
25KB, 580x692px
>>36074
>>56843
>>64817

Hanno and his sailing parade also discovered Gorillas, but Hanno though they were just very ugly, hairy people for a while

>In its inmost recess was an island similar to that formerly described, which contained in like manner a lake with another island, inhabited by a rude description of people. The females were much more numerous than the males, and had rough skins: our interpreters called them Gorillae. We pursued but could take none of the males; they all escaped to the top of precipices, which they mounted with ease, and threw down stones; we took three of the females, but they made such violent struggles, biting and tearing their captors, that we killed them, and stripped off the skins, which we carried to Carthage: being out of provisions we could go no further.
>>
File: Obs05-Scalpel.jpg (24KB, 600x511px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Obs05-Scalpel.jpg
24KB, 600x511px
>>66351
Sharper than steel can get
>>
>>66322
>That story is bullshit

but it's true
>>
>>66462
the weebs on /k/ will not be happy.
>>
>>66544
They'll be fine, they'll claim "But it was made by a volcano, not by humans! Japan still better"
>>
>>36321
>>66462
>>66544
>>66567

obsidian is deadly sharp but the problem is that it flakes pretty easily.

you don't want obsidian flakes in your heart after surgery.
>>
>>59799
Kek at that file name
>>
>>66589
It flakes with impact
>>
File: 1371437246282.jpg (216KB, 990x676px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1371437246282.jpg
216KB, 990x676px
During the second world war the red army was receiving supplies from the Americans, but had yet to engage Germany and open up a second front on the West. This lead soldiers to start referring to the cans of rations they were receiving as 'second fronts', and would joke to eachother "would you please open up a second front?" at mealtime.

Source: Through the Maelstrom by Boris Gorbachevsky
>>
>>62750
The date reached for the Trojan War by later Greeks was 1185. Troy VII, associated with the Trojan War, was destroyed something like 1200-1190. The Hittites have records of at least one war fought between Greek allies, Greeks, and Hittites and Hittite allies, over the cite of Troy. The records also say that the Hittite-aligned ruler of Troy at the time was named Alaksandu.

>>58051
Etruscan has been identified on the Aegean island of Lemnos, close to Thrace (on your map). Lemnos was also the home of Hephaestus in Greek myth. The Etruscans, who devoured all the Greek culture they could, were especially interested in Hephaestus.

I like to imagine that the Minoans, Pelasgians, and Etruscans were all from the same language family. The Etruscans were driven out after their allies at Troy were defeated, the Pelasgians were subdued and integrated into Mycenaean society a thousand years earlier and lost their language, and the Minoans retained their language because of their isolation and the continuity of trade and culture exchange between the newly risen Mycenaeans and the fading Minoans.
>>
>>47453
I just read all of this yesterday in John Tolden's 'Adolf Hitler' incidentally. I may have spelled the author's name wrong but I don't care enough to verify.
>>
>>47560
I remember these things from age of empires 3. That was the only reason I played as the ottomans.
>>
File: Girls.png (477KB, 560x500px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Girls.png
477KB, 560x500px
>>66589
>he doesn't want obsidian flakes in his heart

srsly though was that a thing?
>>
>>36768
Actually shitlord, Shakespeare stole all of the stories from a strong black woman who had ghost written them and took them for himself!!!

Look it up.
>>
>>66894
Strong black lesbian woman
>>
>>66706
More:

Athens was never mentioned in the Iliad as recited by Homer. There are only one or two lines about Athens in the entire 24 book epic, and they're in the book that lists all of the heroes and their origins.

This mention of Athens stands out immediately when you read it because it's the shortest mention in the book and it is structured very similar to one before it. It's believed that the Athenian tyrant Peisistratus had the 'canonized' Iliad written down in the 6th century BC and that he had those 2 sentences about Athens added because a city's identity as Greek relied on being mentioned in either the Iliad or the labours of Heracles, and Athens is omitted from both.

The names mentioned in association with Athens may also be mythological fabrications of Peisistratus' commission. Like all of the mythology pertaining to Athens.

Athens identified itself with the native 'Ionian' Greeks, who were themselves identified with Pelasgians. Athens and Athena are both attested in Linear B and under the Arcopolis there is a bronze age, possibly Mycenaean, fortress or temple.

The Pelasgians were said by Homer to be allies of the Trojans (although perhaps not ALL Pelasgians). Athens was perhaps the last Pelasgian city of any might in the bronze age, and it didn't make it into mythology because it was allied against the Greeks.

Athena is probably a hold over from Pelasgian religion, then.
>>
>>66921
Sorry!!

I didn't mean to demean The Struggle by being wrong! ;'(
>>
>>66942
Better check yourself next time
>>
OP here


So we are at the 24h mark on this thread and I think its gone pretty well so far.
Thanks to everyone for contributing and I hope you've all learned something.
I personally liked >>40966 about the American Civil war doctors using placebo to treat patients, but they were all pretty good.
I was just wondering if we should make this "quick facts" type thread a regular occurrence here on /his/?
IMO we could all afford to learn more from each other through these threads and maybe get a break from the whole Rhodesia/Rome official fanboii threads.

Let me know what you think
>>
>>47230
Romaboo here, I care not for the Empire after the reign of the based Marcus Aurelius
>>
>>45464
To elaborate on this, when Julius Caesar was a young man in the Roman army, he was captured by pirates. He was so charming that he befriended his kidnappers, only to renounce this friendship when he realized the pirates were going to ransom him for far less than Caesar believed he was worth.

Caesar convinced the pirates to raise their asking price dramatically, then vowed that he would crucify every last one of his kidnappers when they refused to listen to him.

The pirates didn't believe him until he came back with a massive armada, captured them, crucified them, and then personally slit the throats of every pirate he had captured.

Ain't no one tries to put Caesar on the clearance rack. Ain't no one.
Thread posts: 321
Thread images: 50


[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / bant / biz / c / can / cgl / ck / cm / co / cock / d / diy / e / fa / fap / fit / fitlit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mlpol / mo / mtv / mu / n / news / o / out / outsoc / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / spa / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vint / vip / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Top | Home]
Please support this website by donating Bitcoins to 16mKtbZiwW52BLkibtCr8jUg2KVUMTxVQ5
If a post contains copyrighted or illegal content, please click on that post's [Report] button and fill out a post removal request
All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.
This is a 4chan archive - all of the content originated from that site. This means that 4Archive shows an archive of their content. If you need information for a Poster - contact them.