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How do you live with the fact you became a programmer. Does anyone

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How do you live with the fact you became a programmer.
Does anyone else have a /g/-related job and hate their lives beyond words.
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>>61175560
I enjoy my job? I don't know why you hate it anon. Sometimes it can be tedious, but often I get to work on interesting problems and fun puzzles.
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>>61175560
I was in a cube farm codemonkey job at IBM and I could feel my soul dying just by looking at that place. All my coworkers were 40 years older than me and seemed to live for their morning coffee break (tbf, they *did* get things done, at the rate of fixing maybe 1 bug per week).

Anyway, I quit that shit as soon as I could and started working on a PhD. This way at least I can stall for a few years before becoming (hopefully) a career researcher. It will be just as crushing, I'm sure, to have to do trivial shit to win grants, but at least I'll be able to work on stuff in the general area that interests me.

But the real moral of the story is that I wish I had dedicated more time to acquiring real skills, like working with machinery or electronics. Anybody and their dog can learn to program, and most companies won't care if you're actually good at it or not as long as you can pass an interview. Fuck being a career programmer
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I didn't want to become a programmer because I would sit by the computer all the time, doing nothing really exciting. But rent needed to be paid and there was no time to choose anything better.
So I started to hate my life a little bit more every day, seeing the life passing by while I sit on one chair and do mostly uninteresting tasks for somebody else's project.
Then I found a gf abroad, managed to persuade the boss to let me work remotely, moved and now I'm on the way to start living on the road and maybe freelancing for some interesting projects to get money for gas.
Being a programmer can be good or also just a stage on a way to something better.
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I enjoy it. Back when I was 18 I thought I could never do it because it would be too hard and wasted a year in college doing dick all, dropped out worked for a bit till I said fuck it and got my comp sci degree.

Dreams becoming reality. Big salary, enjoyable and engaging job

If you're in software and work somewhere you don't like - just fucking quit. Half my ex-classmates got into the same situation, and within a couple months they had new and much better jobs. Lots of places to go when you're in software.
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>>61175560
Sometimes I want to die. But that's normal. I bought a pistol if the will appears. But it's not because I'm a programmer. My work life is tolerable.
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>>61175741
Yeah, I would deal with a lot more tedious programming if I could work remotely and at least not have some manager patrolling around forcing me to look busy. Don't know how people find jobs working remotely.

>I didn't want to become a programmer because I would sit by the computer all the time
My main reason for hating programming as a career isn't that it requires sitting next to a computer, but that 99.999% of programming jobs are doing worthless shit that's of no value to society. Like, if you suddenly disappeared and nobody was there take your job maintaining the build system for some android app that teaches toddlers to "code" or some shit, nobody in the whole world would give a rat's ass. I understand that an economy of unnecessary shit (like almost all software) is great for propping up society by moving around money, but that doesn't mean I don't hate it.
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>>61175898
Hm...I know this is somewhat unrelated, but what about the Computer Security part in the IT industry? Does it suffer the same issues that programming careers have?
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>>61175850
What gun did you buy?
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>>61175955
>Does security suffer from the same issues?
Not really. Funny you should mention that because I'm >>61175649 and I went into security research.

That's not to say that "security" can't be a really shitty job. Good security jobs are ones like pentesting or developing exploit mitigation techniques.

Shitty """security""" jobs are far more common, and you'll basically be responsible for telling your boss which overpriced firewall they should buy so that they can check a box showing that they're abiding by some outdated government IT mandates.

Honestly, the best "security" practice at any software company IMO is just a second person (even a less experienced person) who can do a thorough review to check for mistakes of any changes to code or machine configurations. Tedious but by far the most effective to fix problems.
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>>61175955
If you have interest in security or pen testing.
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>>61176025
Hm, well that sorta eases my unrest. I absolutely LOVE Computer Security to death. I'm self-learning it since college doesn't have anything: no people interested in it, no professors teaching it, no other resources. I'm going to go for a pentesting position and maybe higher than that if I want to take on a challenge.
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>>61175898
Doing something that actually matters is a hard thing to do, not even in software. Take a look at all the secretaries, paper pushers and others. Consider some open source project. But first you have to know your shit.
My work was quite normal 8-4 (more like 9-6 for me) job in a small company with just four devs. After a year or so I told them I would like to move abroad because of a girl and work remotely. They almost laughed at me. So said I have no choice but to quit. Turns out they couldn't let me go because the company's most expensive project would probably fail - nobody else there knows Linux and it's hard to find people who do.
I kinda doubt this would work at some corporation where everybody is replaceable.
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first of all i have to say that i was lucky, and i didn't plan it that way:

i am in that order a
business administration/economist guy
it consultant for business applications
programmer

right now, i do software development almost 100% of my worktime, but its just a phase.

i am very happy that i am not one of those countless eager web / app developer, which focus on nothing else but writing code. i can imagine how it must feel.

actually, recently i noticed that business studies people increasingly go into technical IT positions, and are valued there for their common sense.
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>>61175649
For researching in a Cs field like AI, what path would be better, to study math or physics, or computer science? Is it easier with a math degree to go in the "cutting edge" fields of Cs, or is /sci/ memeing once again?
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>>61176215
AI is a meme, but math/physics to research computer science is even more a meme
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>>61176437
>Math/Physics to research computer science is even more a meme

Try telling that to the professors. baka
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>>61176215
If you care about AI, computer science is literally the only thing you need to worry about, but it only matters in a doctorate program, where you actually cover "cutting-edge" topics. A Master's degree is definitely a meme that is basically another 2 years of undergrad that allows businesspeople to feel good about themselves for wasting money. The only way to learn about a field is to do actual research, and the only way to do actual research in school is to spend several years dedicated to a small number of projects in a single topic.

So, on that note, it doesn't matter if you study math/physics as an undergraduate, as long as you think you'll be able to get into a CS graduate program. This will be much easier with a CS undergrad, but not impossible with math/physics.
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>>61175898
Get a mission critical job. I work in the IT department at a hospital and it feels devilishly good that people will literally die if I don't do my job. Because of this, I don't get bossed around
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>>61177734
A while ago, I turned down an awesome job offer that would have let me work on a team with like 2 other people managing the network controlling a University power grid.

I turned it down because the pay wasn't good enough, and the benefits/hours were worse than my previous job. Still, it was heartbreaking because the work sounded absolutely amazing, and I still occasionally regret that decision even though I'm not currently unhappy with my life.
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