[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / bant / biz / c / can / cgl / ck / cm / co / cock / d / diy / e / fa / fap / fit / fitlit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mlpol / mo / mtv / mu / n / news / o / out / outsoc / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / spa / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vint / vip / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y ] [Search | Extra juicy! | Home]

dpt

This is a blue board which means that it's for everybody (Safe For Work content only). If you see any adult content, please report it.

Thread replies: 335
Thread images: 17

File: haskell.png (49KB, 1000x716px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
haskell.png
49KB, 1000x716px
/dpt/: Haskell edition

Reminder: Functional languages are the only languages worth using.
Reminder: If you aren't using a functional language, you aren't a programmer, just a code monkey.
Reminder: If you try to fight the functional tide, you will be deemed nonfunctional and eventually swept aside.
Reminder: There are only three acceptable programming languages: Haskell, F#, and OCaml. LINQ is also passable if you're a newbie.
Reminder: Go is not a systems language. However, Haskell is.

What are you working on?
>>
tfw people are still copying your shitty meme OP that you cobbled together in order to piss off a trip
>>
Anyway, how do I redirect stdout in a Qt application?
I want the stdout from my program to appear in a text box or some other widget on the form, rather then getting dumped into the terminal that launched the Qt program.

I've googled this but the only thing I can find are vague answers and people using PyQt, which I'm not.
>>
happy jewsgiving
>>
>>51538894
/thread
>>
>>51539034
>self.threading
>any year
>>
>>51537683
The branch predictor will figure out that the branch is taken almost never and in the end there is zero overhead.
>>
what does /dpt/ use for online IDEs? is ideone and tutorialspoint good?
>>
>>51539129
Why check for it if it shouldn't ever happen in a correct program?
>>
>>51539141
vim
>>
I'm a beginner level programmer trying to code in assembly. I'm trying to figure out how to calculate numbers (add/subtract/multiply/divide) if the numbers I'm inputting are being stored as their HEX ASCII value.

Can anyone with experience offer their help? I'm just subtracting 32 from the inputs to get their decimal value since 0-9 is still the same but I have no idea how to convert the result back to the HEX ASCII.
>>
File: ogVcpNg.webm (349KB, 720x404px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
ogVcpNg.webm
349KB, 720x404px
Ask your beloved programming literate anything.
>>
>>51539221
which languages are you proficient at other than C
>>
File: i13544550026.jpg (179KB, 850x1015px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
i13544550026.jpg
179KB, 850x1015px
>>51539255
romaji
>>
>>51539285
alright, why should I learn C if its old
old == bad, btw
>>
>>51539320
>why should I learn C
you should not.
>>
>>51539320
Old just means outdated, it's hardly bad but other languages have learned from it and improved on it.
I just wish there'd be a language that learned from C++ and made it not as shitty.
>>
>>51539109
>implying it's not the only right thing to do
>>
>>51538850
Is using xmonad a good way to get used to Haskell?
>>
>go to bed without having downloaded MonoDevelop because Xamarin's servers are busted
>wake up, still can't download it because they're busted

wowee lads
>>
should I learn python 2 or python 3?
>>
>>51539438
yes.
>>
>>51539438
obviously 3
>>
>>51539404
Probably not. From what I can tell, it will get you used to the xmonad EDSL in Haskell, not Haskell itself.
>>
File: shig pee.jpg (133KB, 960x624px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
shig pee.jpg
133KB, 960x624px
>>51538850
Lisp.

Enough said.
>>
>>51539404
not really, only thing you'd have to do is configure .xmonad/xmonad.hs, and theres good documentation and spoon feeding
>>
>>51539438
newer == better
I mean, come on, its 2015.
>>
>>51539475
why 3?
>>
>>51539438
Python 2 is the most widely supported standard desu.
>>
>>51539435
Tell me tripfag
Why do you trip?>>51539435
>>
File: myDB.png (16KB, 532x260px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
myDB.png
16KB, 532x260px
Trying to upload a file, but its not working and I can't figure it out for the life of me.
HTML form:
<form action="judgeListFileUpload.php" method="post">
<input type="file" name="csv_file">
<input type="submit" name="csv_submit" value="Upload CSV File">
</form>


My php code:
<?php

//check for file upload
if(isset($_FILES['csv_file']) && is_uploaded_file($_FILES['csv_file']['tmp_name'])){

//upload directory
$upload_dir = "/home/myDB/";
//create file name
$file_path = $upload_dir . $_FILES['csv_file']['name'];

//move uploaded file to upload dir
if (!move_uploaded_file($_FILES['csv_file']['tmp_name'], $file_path)) {

//error moving upload file
echo "Error moving file upload";

}

else {
echo "File Uploaded!"
}
}

?>


Its not uploading the csv file, nor is it triggering any of the echo statements. It should upload the file to /home/myDB
>>
>>51539572

Because you hate it. Your anger gives me power.
>>
>>51539520
because
>>51539519
>>
>>51538850
I love Haskell but goddamn is it useless for systems programming. Enjoy not being able to implement a proper quicksort.

Haskell is much more interesting as a language to learn about programming concepts, than as a tool to actually write a program.
>>
>>51539455
>le "answering non-yes-no-question with yes" meme
>>
File: shiggy.jpg (9KB, 250x250px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
shiggy.jpg
9KB, 250x250px
>>51539644
>>51539519
>>51539475
>recommending shitty python 3 that has far less support than python 2 does
>>
>>51539649
It's a pretty damn good tool for writing tools to write programs.
>>
>>51539212
>subtracting 32
Are you even trying gaylord?
>>
>>51539678
would you rather I said mu
>>
any haskellers can shed some light on what the difference between applicative functors, monads, and plain functors is?
seems to me that all functors are applicatives and monads, and the methods defined in the type classes are what make the difference

also, in what circumstances would monads and applicatives be useful; just give me an example that would require wrapping functions inside functors and unwrapping functors to use stuff on other functors
>>
>>51539129
The branch target buffer doesn't have an infinite number of entries, if you fill it up with useless branches you'll eventually spill out entries which have to be there (like function calls and loops)
>>
File: asciifull.gif (27KB, 715x488px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
asciifull.gif
27KB, 715x488px
>>51539699
Oh shit, I don't know why I said 32, I meant subtract 30.

>Trying to check if accumulator value is positive or negative
>OR 01111111
>There's no NOT command in assembly language for the result
>>
>>51538850
>Haskell, F#, and OCaml
>2015
>still not programming in lambda calulus
just stay pleb tier
>>
>>51538850
Trying to figure out how to use textures in OpenGL with Haskell
>>
>>51539725
Every monad is an applicative.
Not all functors are applicative functors.
A functor is just a thing that implements the "fmap" method.
The applicative functor goes beyond that, and adds the <$> and <*> operators so they can be used for sequential application like this...
(+) <$> Just 2 <*> Just 3

Which returns "Just 5".

See https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/Applicative_functors
>>
Im thinking on doing a small, simple VCS system in Haskell for my functional programming course, should I do it?
>>
>>51539725
A monad is an applicative functor is a functor.
http://adit.io/posts/2013-04-17-functors,_applicatives,_and_monads_in_pictures.html

Applicative functors are useful for things like parser combinators. You can quickly combine primitive parsers in an applicative (matching ordinary function application) manner to make complex parsers like this:
data Thing = Thing String Int Float

parseThing :: Parser Thing
parseThing = Thing <$> parseString <*> parseInt <*> parseFloat

If the parser is also monadic, it supports lookahead, i.e. doing different things depending on what it's just read.
parseEither :: Parser (Either Thing Stuff)
parseEither = do
which <- parseString
case which of
"Thing" -> Left <$> parseThing
"Stuff" -> Right <$> parseStuff


As you can see, with either applicative functors or monads, it's useful to be able to use fmap (<$>), so both must be functors. The reason monads are applicative functors is more subtle, but informally, you can always define an applicative functor instance for a given monad.
instance Monad m => Applicative m where
pure = return
mf <*> mx = mf >>= (<$> mx)
>>
>>51539770
"shig"
SKI master race.

https://gist.github.com/shangaslammi/3438688
>>
>>51539495
Who are these dudes?
>>
>>51538926
Anybody?
>>
>>51539931
nigga you serious?
>>
>>51539931
Left is that guy from the office
Right is Linus Torvaldo
>>
>>51539170
but what about an online IDE that I can use from any computer? what is the best online IDE?
>>
>>51539954
Yep. Seen this pic few times in dpt, and that's it.
>>
>>51539958
>Right is Linus Torvaldo
seriously

to me it looks like that guy from the [s]COMPUTER SCIENCE[/s] lecture
>>
>>51539935
Seems complex, why aren't you just writing to your own function which writes to stdout/the textbox with minimal modification?
>>
>>51539967
how about installing a linux distro on a usb, and instlaling vim on that, that way, you can use it from any comp
>>
I've been looking and can't find a solution for windows, I'm trying to get the pid of a process.
I found os.getpid() but that gives me python's PID...
I'm really trying to get the ports the particular program uses, I need the PID first, is seems.

What do you fine people think?
Is there an easier way?
>>
>>51539967
>>51539998
Or just install an IDE to a USB/portable harddrive instead of an entire operating system.
>>
>>51539968
the one on the left is the ishygddt meme guy
(like here >>51539683)
don't know the other one doe
>>
newtype keyword is confusing in haskell; is faster inference the only benefit?
>>
>/dpt/: Haskell edition
Who gay-for-pay here?
>>
>>51539998
I once tried to install memebuntu to a USB drive. Turned out that the drive hasn't been properly unmounted every time I shut down the machine and it resulted in fs corruption. I blame systemd btw.
>>
>>51539843
i think i kind of get it, I still have to review that chapter anyways
also, how advanced/literate are you in it
have you written any grand programs?
>>
>>51539986
My program calls another program that writes to my program's stdout. I can't feasibly rewrite that other program so the only real way to do this would be to intercept my Qt program's stdout and send it to a text box.
Unless there's a way to redirect the output of system(), in which case I'd be glad to use that.
>>
>>51540124
I haven't finished anything amazing yet, but I'm currently working on my own language using Haskell to implement the compiler.
>>
What is a ``FROB''?
>>
>>51540236
that's a really weird way of using quotes desu
>>
>>51540236
You mean +FORB+ right?
>>
>>51540258
>he doesn't know ``\latex''
>>
>>51540181
is it Valutron
>>
>>51540236
uh, it's a pretty common thing you do to widgets (e.g. "I frobbed that widget")
have you been living under a rock
>>
>>51540172
No idea if it'd work but this seems like basically the same question (C++) except with files but you should be able to change that.
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/10940765/redirecting-stdout-from-another-program-in-c
>>
>>51540324
Hell, no.
>>
>>51540364
learning experience then?
also, where did u learn haskell from, was it learn you a haskell? if so, what did you do after it, was that book all you needed?
>>
>>51540172
Doesn't popen do that? I think it's a C standard library function...
>>
>>51540379
I never really read any books about it, I just picked it up through reading random articles and source code all over the place. It's not like it was my first language.
>>
>>51539744
This is my favorite ASCII chart :)
What the fuck, in my image captcha there's a watermelon someone carved into a polar bear.
It was select all the flowers, so I selected that cutie spagooti and it allowed it.
>>
>>51540324
valutron is implemented in C, tard.
>>
>>51540458
impressive
>>
File: normiesunwanted.jpg (464KB, 1131x1600px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
normiesunwanted.jpg
464KB, 1131x1600px
Anon, where were you when the functional programming revolution happened ?
>>
>>51540548
These videos in particular were really good at helping me "get" monads, which are the big hurdle

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZhuHCtR3xq8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XxzzJiXHOJs
>>
>inb4 bunch of nerds
>>
bunch of nerds
>>
>>51540454

popen is posix.
>>
>>51540551
I was at home, when I get call "functional is love", they say, "functional is life" I say
>>51540495
sorry
>>51540566
ill check it out, anyways, have you done internet stuff with haskell? Do i need to learn networking first?
>>
>>51540609
I've never delved into networking in Haskell, no. You might be interested in looking into FRP.
>>
>>51540551
I was reading this post.
>>
>>51540551
Doing something worth my time. Like autofelatio.
>>
>>51540243
>why dpt so slow today?
that's the old thread, it's past the bump limit
>the office is ridiculously boring today.
maybe because it's thanksgiving
>>
>>51540551
bravely fighting the imperative tards on /r/programming and /dpt/.
>>
>>51540699
I'm Canadian.
>>
>>51540013
found psutil,
I don't know how to find the PID for "plugin-container.exe", I can put it's PID in and find the ports it uses, that's a plus
but
still need to find PID by name for full automation
Help?
>>
>>51540730
are you hacking flash games you hacker?
>>
>>51540802
n-no...
>>
File: fp.png (243KB, 810x763px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
fp.png
243KB, 810x763px
>>51538850

https://storify.com/realtalktech/why-functional-programming-sucks

https://storify.com/realtalktech/startup-ceo-s-functional-programming-isn-t-bad-it-

https://storify.com/realtalktech/editorial-redaction-and-apology-we-write-bad-criti

https://storify.com/realtalktech/functional-programming-solipsism-and-autism

https://storify.com/realtalktech/functional-programmers-react-to-criticism

https://storify.com/realtalktech/lessons-for-functional-programmers


https://storify.com/realtalktech/5-absurd-lies-of-functional-programmer-shills
>>
>>51540834
titles had me laughing out loud.
>>
>>51540834
>anti FP enthusiasts are meme spouting retards
Why am I not surprised?
>>
>>51539998
can I run a linux distro on a chromebook?
>>
>>51540834
http://storify.com/realtalktech/*
>>
Good day.
I am generally interested in bash, LaTeX, mutt, screen and vim, which are used on a daily basis. Other interests include programming in perl, python, gdb and gcc.

In my earlier days I used to be SysOp of a BBS system where I wrote many of the 'doors' and menu systems (mid-late 1990's). These were mostly in Pascal and C. These systems were single user and single process. There's a large number of the BBS details that I had at some time dialed into, running up phone bills.

Thank you.
>>
>>51539389
Go, Rust
plenty to choose from bro
>>
>>51540967
He said "not as shitty", anon.
>>
>>51540953
I once had enough time to write a document for linux gazette on DNS techniques back in issue 130.

Some time in 2007 I decided that it'd be cool to learn to write some apache httpd modules.
>>
>>51541016
The linux kernel is very interesting to me and I have read several books about it, but I'm still waiting for some creativity before I find an area where a new module or alteration might be required, this is more an interest than an area that I'm active in.

For a few years I was a qmail administrator.
>>
>>51540243
Here, you can help me figure this out
>>51539212
>>51539744
>>
>>51540624
FRP?
Acrony for what?
>>
File: 17pmu.png (26KB, 659x520px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
17pmu.png
26KB, 659x520px
As everyone knows, a standard text editor cannot replace the power of an all-knowing IDE.
Having superior syntax highlighting has been now tested to increase productivity in understanding code.

Source: http://ppig.org/sites/default/files/2015-PPIG-26th-Sarkar.pdf
(though - more tests are needed; the sample size was thought to be too low)
>>
>>51541029
My degree is from Lincoln University in Computing and Internet Technologies, I have a HND in Computing from Reading College and an OND in Computing from Newbury College and I've worked in the ISP business since 2003.

I spent some time getting interested in IPv6, so took the certification test that he.net offers IPv6
>>
>>51541081
While this is the case, common sense has shown shitposting on /dpt/ reduce productivity by 100%.
>>
>>51541081
>not using a text editor with syntax highlighting
Literally the only IDE feature you need.
>>
>>51541081
Define standard text editor and IDE.
>>
>>51541210
a standard text-editor syntax highlighting abilities are gimped compared to an IDE.
if your syntax highlighter only depends on one file or a folder of files, you are shooting yourself in the foot.
>>
>>51539870
thats also looks good in my eyes, will try it.
>>
>>51540730
I figured it out for anyone interested.
It's really fucked though.
import os, sys, win32api, re

tasklistrl = os.popen("tasklist").readlines()
tasklistr = os.popen("tasklist").read()

#print(tasklistr)
se = tasklistr
pattern = r"(plugin-container.exe*.*)"
pattern_re = re.compile(pattern)
task = pattern_re.findall(str(se))[0]
print(task)
str = task
desu = max([int(s) for s in str.split() if s.isdigit()])
print("PID: ",max([int(s) for s in str.split() if s.isdigit()]))
>>
>>51538850
>haskell is a sytems programming language
> when there is ocaml and rust

haskell is for academic masturbation with zygohistomorphic prepomorphisms
>>
>>51541210
So how do you build GUIs without an IDE?
Oh right, you have to code it by hand like a scrub where an IDE user (assuming the IDE is good) can just drag, drop and edit elements to have something code it for them.
>>
>>51541300
I can make up words too, you finky diddlemonkey.
>>
>>51541233
text editor: e.g. vim, vi, emacs, nano, editor
IDE: e.g. visual studio, sublime, eclipse, products from jetbrains, atom/atom clones like visual studio code
>>
>>51541308
>building GUIs
That is already scrub tier.
>>
>>51541329
sublime is an ide? what the fuck?
if you are putting sublime text in the same category as visual studio you're probably retarded
>>
>>51541352
What're you posting through?
A textbox on a browser on an operating system (potentially on a VM), each of which require GUIs to be built. GUIs are important as fuck.
>>
>>51541329
vim and emacs both have proper syntax highlighting.
>>
>>51541373
it's kinda half-way between the two.
plugins can add support for many features found in IDEs like VS, but yes, without plugins, it would be in the text editor category.
>>
>>51541308
Dreamweaver user detected.
>>
>>51541235
>a standard text-editor syntax highlighting abilities are gimped compared to an IDE.
Nope.
>>
>>51541420
VS actually, the GUI builder spoiled me.
>>
>>51541081
>samples size of 10
>eye tracking data was unreliable for 3, so only 7 data points there
lel
Neither peer reviewed nor reproduced.
And they seem to not have accounted for one obvious factor - these people were probably used to having syntax highlighting, so they had learned to always read code with it and not having it becomes a temporary extra adjustment.
>>
>>51541052
functional reactive programming, a.k.a. memetic meme programming.
>>
>>51540953
Why screen instead of tmux?

>>51541410
Vim has a huge selection of plugins.
>>
>>51541410
Vim and emacs are literally more powerful and more fullfeatured by two orders of magnitude compared to sublime meme. As expected, IDEfags don't know shit about anything.
>>
>>51541300
>too dumb for haskell
>>
>>51541523
I just posted all that shit from some guys About Me page.
>>
>>51541328
https://wiki.haskell.org/Zygohistomorphic_prepromorphisms
>>
should I learn python 3 only? will I ever use python 2?
>>
>>51541481
every single coder in modern society uses syntax highlighting
only neets found on this board are the outliers
so, according to that logic, the sample (people used to highlighting) does represent the standard coder
>and not having it becomes a temporary extra adjustment.
this was mentioned in the paper. more experienced programmers had less trouble understanding the unhighlighted code.
>>
>>51541562
>every single coder in modern society uses syntax highlighting
not linus torvalds
>>
>>51541562
And the autist behind go.
>>
>>51541561
The crusade against Python 3 is over. Library maintainers are finally porting over their code. So you should learn Python 3 instead of 2.
>>
>>51541584
Maybe in a decade knowing python 3 will matter! Let's start learning python 3 today to be ready for the next decade! It's not like you need to be able to program in the meantime or anything.
>>
>>51539577
in your form you must use enctype=multipart/form-data parameter
>>
>Try to learn me a haskell
>IO()
>IO everywhere
What's the point of functional languages if I'm stuck in a non-pure monad?
>>
>>51541235
The best syntax highlighting uses font weight and variations in the saturation of one color instead of a rainbow vomit of neutral and non-neutral colors. For example, italic, faded comments give them the impression of human handwriting while distinguishing them from the regular or bold full-saturation text of the code.

Does your DE come with a theme for that, or is it limited to some borland/vim/emacs style of rainbow vomit?

>>51541308
You use a free-standing UI builder like glade
>>
>>51541429
an IDE knows the context of the code, a syntax highlighter in an editor works by highlighting certain keywords.

By knowing the context, a valid variable can be highlighted differently than one that is not.

Certain languages are easy enough to highlight correctly.
But something like c/c++ is more efficient to highlight correctly.

There are still a lot of highlighters that doesn't differentiate between = and ==.
Something like if( a = b) is really important to highlight as it is usually unwanted behaviour.
>>
File: C++vsObjC.jpg (62KB, 728x546px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
C++vsObjC.jpg
62KB, 728x546px
>>51538850
The functional languages have made a great contribution to computing, starting with John Carmack's original Lisp 1.5.

Just compare the object-oriented + functional + dynamic languages (Objective-Smalltalk, Objective-C, Ruby, Common Lisp, O'CaML, F#) to the object-oriented + procedural/imperative + static languages (C++, Delphi, Java)

The procedural-OO languages are hideously ugly usually, require tons of boilerplate, have relatively primitive support for important things like dynamic dispatch, and have type systems that impose impossible burdens on your code. The Functional-OO languages tend to be beautiful and built by actual programming language theorists rather than hackers who don't know what a design pattern is..
>>
>>51541600
Wasn't the question if anon should learn python 3 instead of python 2?
>>
>>51541562
>this was mentioned in the paper. more experienced programmers had less trouble understanding the unhighlighted code.
No, see your own point:
>every single coder in modern society uses syntax highlighting
They probably did not have any people who doesn't use syntax highlighting on a regular basis, who knows, maybe they would be slower with the highlighting just because it's unfamiliar to them.
It's a factor not accounted for.
(And not, not everyone uses highlighting, notably people like Rob Pike, Ritchie, Torvalds)
>so, according to that logic, the sample (people used to highlighting) does represent the standard coder
Nope.
>>
>>51541622
>an IDE knows the context of the code
So does a programmable text editor.
Protip: We're not talking notepad.exe here.
>>
>>51541210
Code completion (which also allows you to have more readable code).
While it's also doable in a text editor, it's not to the same extent.
>>
>>51538850
Meme languages
>>
>>51541691
If you're relying on code completion, your names are too long. Using code completion for function/method lookup indicates a poorly written library.
>>
>>51541600
linux distros are already beginning to phase out python 2 and making python 3 the default. might as well get used to python 3 since python 2 isn't getting new features and is on life support.
>>
>>51541716
Can you not read? A bit ironic.
>which allows you to have more readable code
>>
If I have a working program in Java (from Eclipse), and started a new Android Studio project, how do I integrate the Java files into my new Android Studio project?
>>
>>51541777
Why would code completion allow for more readable code?
>>
>>51541791
More descriptive functions/variables and the length doesn't ruin productivity.
>>
In node.js I've seen code samples that look like:

if (request.method == 'POST') {
var body = '';}

I've been under the impression that one should use === as much as possible, but I think the standard method is ==. Can someone tell me why? Is it because 'POST' is just a textual approximation for the POST method and there is no way to check for a POST specifically except through this looser equality?
>>
>>51540495
>C memory model
>>
>>51541774
Yeah, because linux distros decide if expansive, ubiquitous python libraries' authors will spend a few millions getting their shit up and running on python 3. Oh wait.
>>
>>51541779

Copy and paste?
>>
>>51541622
Good syntax highlighting doesn't assign every single operator its own special color. You can already tell what an operator is.

Good syntax highlighting knows when something like string stops and when it doesn't, so you can tell when you accidentally stopped a block by forgetting to escape something or whatever.

Good syntax highlighting means you can tell "which" 'string' `is` ''which'' and see what's going on without looking too hard.

Good syntax highlighting highlights delimiters so you can tell which matches which.

Good syntax highlighting knows what's special and highlights shit like &amp; and \x007.

>>51541813
Code completion combined with verbose names ruins productivity if two or more names are similar.
>>
>>51541691
It's exactly to the same extent.
>>
>>51541940
So I don't need to do anything special? Like if I copy the entire folder over, all the information about packages and stuff is retained and will work?
>>
I'm doing python practice. do I have to close my text editor before testing the program out? will keeping the text editor running corrupt the file?
>>
>>51541961

When I started using Android studio more that's what I did, but I did get some package errors. If you have the entire concept of how the program works then it shouldn't be hard to port it over. Give it a try and see what happens.
>>
>>51541990
Yes. it could turn your computer into a bomb and harm your children.
>>
>>51541990
It shouldn't
>>
>>51541928
what's your problem with python 3?
>>
>>51542012
That fact that nobody uses it.
>>
>>51540953
>>>/g/flt
>>
>>51542028
that seems like an opinion rather than a fact
>>
>>51541328
>>51541558
>https://wiki.haskell.org/Zygohistomorphic_prepromorphisms
HAHAHAHAHA
>>
>>51542038
see >>51541544
I get enough shitposts about which language is best, I don't need your thread of people shitposting about which distro is the best.
>>
>>51542058
Facts can be opinion, opinions can be fact. True facts remain true regardless of their status, while your opinion is belongs nowhere but the trash.
>>
>>51541300
Haskell's not a systems language, sure, but for reasons completely unrelated to category theory. You can implement a zygohistomorphic prepomorphism in anything.
>>
>>51541822
welcome to JS
also, >>>/g/wdg

>>51542087
see >>51542038

>>51542091
there are tons of python libs compatible with both python 2 and 3
>>
>>51541956
>exactly to the same extent
So what can a text editor complete?
Anything in the current file, maybe even anything in the standard libraries, if you're lucky then also everything in the current directory.
What can an IDE complete?
Anything linked to the current project.

I'm not trying to take your precious text editor away, I just find them worse compared to an IDE.
>>
>>51542127
Mea culpa, I should have said "nobody relevant".
>>
>>51539931
Left is costanza. Right is sussman. Step up and achieve satori, senpai.
>>
>>51542138
>I just find them worse
well, yeah, notepad is pretty bad
>>
>>51542138
>So what can a text editor complete?
Anything in the current file, in the current project, in the #included/imported/etc. libraries, and in the language, in a completely context-aware way.
>>>/reddit/
>>
>>51542001
Thanks, just had to add another "folder." to my import statements.
>>
>>51542157
>>51542028
exactly. python 3 will never be relevant and there is no point in learning it.
>>
>>51542168
>in the current project
Then would you really consider that just a text editor?
>>
>>51542211

Cool.
>>
>>51542168
>implying I'm going to memorize 100 seemingly arbitrarily named commands for VI to not be shit
>>
If somebody could help me out it'd be much appreciated. I have a text file I'm using to store data, it looks like this:

start_allCities
allCities London
allCities Paris
allCities Tehran

start_allX
allX 0
allX 2
allX 51

start_allY
allY 51
allY 48
allY 36


Basically a bunch of cities along with their co-ordinates (I cut most of them out for brevity). The idea is that my program reads to/writes from this text file. Reading is no problem, but when I try to write in, existing text is overwritten. What I have now:

// Input types: start_allCities, start_allX, start_allY, et cetera
void writeToFile (string inputData, string inputType)
{
string line;
string type = inputType;
type.erase(0, 6);
fstream myFile("cityData.txt");
if (myFile.is_open()) // Check if the file has been opened successfully
{
while (getline(myFile, line)) // Retrieve every line in the text file sequentially
{
if (line.string::find(inputType) == 0) // Find the line with the correct identifier, for example start_allCities to know you're at the list of cities
{
myFile << "1234567890";/*endl << type << " " << inputData;*/ // Add new city to text file
}
}
myFile.close();
}
}

int main ()
{
writeToFile("Merv", "start_allCities");
writeToFile("62", "start_allX");
writeToFile("38", "start_allY");
return 0;
}


As it stands, Merv will overwrite London. How can I make the program insert the text without deletion? The usual answer give online is "add it to the end", but obviously that's not an option because I have to write it to a specific place.
>>
>>51541300
>>51542123
And actually, implementing things like zygohistomorphic prepomorphisms is GOOD for systems programming because it lets you potentially optimize recursion. For example, if you write a memoizing histomorphism, all recursive operations you build using that histomorphism will be automatically memoized.
>>
>>51542028
>nobody in /dpt/ uses it
but then again, keep in mind that /dpt/ can't even average two ints regardless of memory model, so...
>>
>>51542028

>Nobody uses it

This couldn't be any further from the truth
>>
>>51541584
>>51541600
The only redeeming virtue of Python is that the flamewar over 2 vs 3 was so great it overshadowed bashing PHP.
>>
>>51542260
nobody uses python 3 you fucking faggot, it will never be relevant and nobody will ever use it when we have python 2.
>>
>>51542242
>seemingly arbitrarily named commands
ask us how we know you have a mental illness
>>
>>51542260
>in /dpt/
Are you retarded or just pretending?
By that logic, brainfuck is a legitimate production-ready programming language and you should use it right now.
>>
What's wrong with Python 3 again?
>>
>>51542295
everything. absolutely everything. nobody should ever use python 3. it's a waste of time.
>>
>>51542295
The fact that nobody uses it.
>>
>>51542274
>nobody in /dpt/ uses python 3
yeah, because they're idiots, like previously established and extensively proven
>>
>>51542320
nobody in /dpt/ uses python 3 because they have a brain.
>>
>>51542293
>By that logic, brainfuck is a legitimate
when were you diagnosed, anon?
>>
>>51542285
Because I like using my mouse AND keyboard rather than hjkliawb (shit which was necessary 40 fucking years ago, not today).
>>
>>51542329
>because they have a brain that doesn't work
indeed
>>
>>51541609
Doing it wrong, friend. You only need a single IO call, and fill it with the entire output.
>>
>>51542360
give me one good reason I should use python 3.
>>
>>51542340
>I like using my mouse
more than the touchscreen? for editing text? you're surely joking, anon
>>
>>51541609
That's what fmap is for.
>>
>>51542379
why bother; you wouldn't understand half the words when you're this slow
>>
File: hellodarkness.jpg (67KB, 479x370px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
hellodarkness.jpg
67KB, 479x370px
mfw I'm going to learn java.
>>
>>51542384
>the touchscreen
What garbage are you programming on?

And you see, the mouse lets you go between/up/down files/programs and select the exact text you want with ease.
>>
>>51542420
wat's the backstory of dat pic ?
>>
>>51542421
>mouse lets you go
just like a touchscreen; scrolling through the file has never been easier
>>
>>51542420
Literally nothing wrong with it.
Except no unsigned.
And no operator overloading.
And sometimes the names are a bit funny.
And the RAM/CPU usage is a bit high for a toaster.
And transporting code from eclipse on one machine to another can be a real pain in the ass when the java versions are slightly different.
And Swing.

The hate is (mostly) unjustified.
>>
>>51541631
>The Functional-OO languages tend to be beautiful and built by actual programming language theorists rather than hackers who don't know what a design pattern is..

You can tell, based on all the great functional OO software out there.
>>
>>51542472
That is good to hear. I just don't fancy OOP and boilerplate, but I guess I'll have to manage.
>>
>>51542496
Such as fftw, the single best-performing FFT implementation.
>>
>>51542460
Whatever floats your boat, program on your phone with a text editor if you want champ, I'm not going to stop you.
>>
>>51541329

hate emacs, but anon, both emacs and vim have very mature plugin functionality
>>
>>51542420
Make sure to learn D to wash the bad taste out of your mouth
>>51542472
Don't forget pass by value only
>>
>>51542472

>Swing

No one learns Swing anymore. JavaFX is where it's at for Java Graphics.
>>
>>51542513
>I'm not going to stop you
of course not, you're just a retard using a mouse to edit text, what the fuck do you think you'd be able to stop?
>>
>>51542524
Pass by value only for primitives, pass by reference only for aggregates.
>>
>>51542472
And verbosity.
And no lambdas until java8 even though a fuckload of code relies on lambda-like abstraction.
And no proper closures.
And no TCO.
And the JVMs being historically insecure as shit.
And forced exception checking.
And no interface/abstract/overload indicators.
And a billion other reasons because java is garbage.
>>
>>51542558
No, just pass by value, Java doesn't have pass by reference.
>>
>>51542524
Pass by value where the value is a reference for all objects.

>>51542505
Java's OOP as fuck, you'll have to get used to that. It takes some getting used to its somewhat verbosity.
>>
>>51542574
Well, I suppose you're technically passing references by value. Doesn't change the fact that you can't make an aggregate value type.
>>
>>51542570

Also, bad interop.
>>
>>51542558
It's always by value.
Object o = new Object();
doesn't actually store an object, it stores a reference to the object so passing o to a method is passing the reference.

I think I've got that right anyway.
>>
>>51542630
That is correct.
>>
>>51542630
Yes, but calling it "passing by value" is just splitting hairs and not giving any semantic meaning.
>>
>>51542648
What "semantic meaning"? It is called "pass by value" because it IS "pass by value".
>>
>>51542671
You're passing the object by reference. You don't use the reference, you use the object, so why talk about something irrelevant like how the reference is being passed?
>>
>>51542510
GPL?

I can't even use it.

I don't mean to sound like a jerk anon, but what the fuck.

You give me software with a license that has more lines than the actual library has.

It's just. Fuck.

You little shits here need to understand truth.

I wish you a happy Thanksgiving anon, I just wish you'd be more sensitive about licensing.
>>
>>51542683
What the fuck does that mean??

And what language?
>>
File: 1443717897495.jpg (18KB, 279x246px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1443717897495.jpg
18KB, 279x246px
>>51542712
>>
http://pastebin.com/PDt55bjz

Fuck yeah WinAPI.
Whenever I have to touch winAPI, it just seems so weird. Like, it's clearly well intentioned, it's just... urgh. There's nothing chronically *wrong* with it, it's just small mistakes (in hindsight) that pile onto each other until you have an unholy heap of shit on top of a semi-decent API.
>>
>>51542737
Obligatory

http://mollyrocket.com/casey/stream_0029.html
>So there you have it, ladies and gentlemen: the only API I’ve ever used that requires both elevated privileges and a dedicated user thread just to copy a block of structures from the kernel to the user.
>>
>>51542737
ytilibitapmoC
>>
>>51542683
>You're passing the object
No, you're passing the value of the reference.
"Pass by reference" has a different meaning from what you think.
Consider the following:
AnyTypeYouWant t = ...;
AnyTypeYouWant backup = t;
modify(t);
assert t == backup;

There's no way to break that assertion regardless of how you implement the "modify" function and regardless of what you use instead of "AnyTypeYouWant".
In C++ or C# you can, because they have pass-by-reference.
>>
>>51542783
>You need root access to monitor system-wide information
No shit.
That's not to say event tracing is good, but come the fuck on. You can't let any pleb monitor high-resolution timing information for all processes, what are side channel attacks?
>>
how long would it take me to learn how to program in HTML5?
>>
File: b.png (106KB, 976x894px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
b.png
106KB, 976x894px
Does anyone have experience with PLC programming? I am using the Beremiz application for making IEC 61131 programs. Is there any way to simulate the programs?

Here's the .st file that is produced by this simple program:
PROGRAM program0
VAR_INPUT
in1 : BOOL;
in2 : BOOL;
END_VAR
VAR_OUTPUT
out1 : BOOL;
END_VAR
VAR
AND1_OUT : BOOL;
END_VAR

AND1_OUT := AND(in1, in2);
out1 := AND1_OUT;
END_PROGRAM


CONFIGURATION config

RESOURCE resource1 ON PLC
TASK task1(INTERVAL := T#1s0ms,PRIORITY := 0);
PROGRAM prog WITH task1 : program0;
END_RESOURCE
END_CONFIGURATION
>>
>>51542870
It's impossible, HTML isn't programming, so no time at all.
>>
been trying to draw a triangle using directx for over an hour now and it still wont fucking work
whats the correct order for matrix multiplication?
do i transpose matrices before sending them to the hlsl shader?
whats the order of mutliplcation within hlsl? (ex mul(pos, ViewMatrix) vs mul(ViewMatrix, pos)
why is the 3d world such a cluster fuck?
>>
File: umaru2.jpg (1MB, 1700x2400px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
umaru2.jpg
1MB, 1700x2400px
>>51539285
>>
>>51542870
b8
>>
>>51542829
>There's no way to break that assertion regardless of how you implement the "modify" function and regardless of what you use instead of "AnyTypeYouWant".
That's because "t" and "backup" are references to the same object. In any case, == only checks for pointer equality when talking about objects, in Java. In C++ or with value types in C#, == checks for value equality.

>>51542867
Moot point when talking about security, because the hacker will have an administrator account on his machine.

>>51542900
Pick whatever you want for your own application and stick with it. If you're also the guy from the AGDG thread who's having trouble with the clipped triangle, my guess would be that you're using a projection matrix that's meant for OpenGL, which has a different clip space (Z between -1 and 1) than D3D (Z between 0 and 1).
>>
>>51542696
Meanwhile in real life, it's the implementation every single serious person who needs fft uses.
>>
Why am I getting more than the two lines?
http://pastebin.com/TEVyWMVJ
>output
http://pastebin.com/5EBsiXD9
>>
>>51542961
don't write single line loops senpai
>>
>>51542900
>loldirectx
>>
>>51542942
>If you're also the guy from the AGDG thread who's having trouble with the clipped triangle
yeah that would be me

i've looked over the code for it many times, i think its correct
    //Create view and projection matrix.
XMVECTOR eye = XMLoadFloat3(&XMFLOAT3(0.f, 0.f, -7.f));
XMVECTOR look = XMLoadFloat3(&XMFLOAT3(0.f, 0.f, 0.f));
XMVECTOR up = XMLoadFloat3(&XMFLOAT3(0.f, 1.f, 0.f));
XMMATRIX viewMatrix = XMMatrixLookAtLH(eye, look, up);
XMMATRIX projMatrix = XMMatrixPerspectiveFovLH(XMConvertToRadians(90), m_outputWidth / m_outputHeight, D3D11_MIN_DEPTH, D3D11_MAX_DEPTH);
>>
>>51542961
>python
wakemeupinside.jpg
>>
>>51543037
You don't want to use D3D11_MIN_DEPTH and D3D11_MAX_DEPTH for your projection matrix. Those constants are in terms of NDC, and like I said will have the values 0 and 1, respectively.
>>
>>51542999
but..
Does that really count as a loop?
>>
>>51542942
>== only checks for pointer equality when talking about objects, in Java
>In C++ or with value types in C#, == checks for value equality
It always checks for value equality in Java, C++ and C#. Even when the value is a reference.
>>
>>51543082
how do you check reference equality
>>
File: 1442246460245.jpg (465KB, 3888x2592px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1442246460245.jpg
465KB, 3888x2592px
>>51543061
thanks anon
one less bug to go
>>
>>51543082
You're autistic. When someone says "pass the object into the function" do you interrupt them and say "ackshually it's a REFERENCE to an object"?
>>
>>51543122
>When someone says "pass the object into the function" do you interrupt them
No. What would be the purpose?
>>
>>51543122
a reference is an object
>>
>>51543103
But the reference is the value.
>>
>>51543122
>being wrong is being normal!
>being right is being autistic!
>>
>>51543079
>*for* s in ...
>>
>>51543156
That's what you're doing here:
>>51542630
>>51542829
>>51543082
>>
>>51543103
>>51543122
looks like you lads don't understand the difference in semantics between reference types and reference parameters, eh?
>>
>>51543039
CAN'T WAKE UP
>>
>>51543162
memory address is an important value, acts as a primary key
>>
>>51543175
Because we're talking specifically about pass-by-reference and you don't understand what pass-by-value and pass-by-reference mean. If we wouldn't be discussing pass-by-reference, I wouldn't interrupt anything.
>>
>>51543175
This is an imageboard where no one here has anything better to do, of course we're going to correct your incorrect statement.
>>
>>51543218
>Because we're talking specifically about pass-by-reference
I thought you were trying to argue that Java only had pass-by-value?

>>51543222
It's not incorrect that Java has pass-by-reference.
>>
>>51543170
But what does that have to do with regex messing up?
It's supposed to only have two lines,
plugin-container.exe 8860
and
plugin-container.exe 9276
?
It's supposed to output all of the numbers.
>>
>>51543230
We've said it before, Java doesn't have pass by reference, it always passes by value even when the value is a reference.
>>
>>51543230
>I thought you were trying to argue that Java only had pass-by-value.
Yes, and I had to explain to you what both concepts (pass-by-reference and pass-by-value) mean.
>not incorrect that Java has pass-by-reference
You don't understand what pass-by-reference means.
>>
>>51543262
>>51543272
Alright, can you outline the difference between "pass an object by reference" and "pass a reference to an object by value"?
>>
I don't see web dev general so I'm gonna ask here maybe someone could point me to the right direction.

I'm building a web traffic analyzer and I've built most of it. Now I want to show my info and have a drop down menu which will call a certain action (ie : show browser percentage per country). The easiest way to do it I guess is by sending the chosen variable to my SELECT. How would I send this variable ?

I'm working with ASP.NET MVC.
This is my current view code.
<script>
document.getElementById("myBtn").addEventListener("click", function(){
document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = '<img src="@Url.Action("DrawChart")" />';

});
</script>
>>
>>51543176
how do you check reference equality/object identity
>>
>>51539683
People like you are the reason why Python 3 has less support
>>
>>51542379
One good reason? Because Python 2 isn't receiving updates anymore, so if you want new features you have to use Python 3.

More reason?
>Byte strings
>input() changes
>print is a function
>division is consistent now
>iterators and generators
>lazy range(), map(), etc.
>>
>>51543399
static typing is allowed by python 3's standard

can't wait for complete dynamic typing to die
>>
Rate my code:

public static int multiply(int x, int y) {
int total = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < y; i++) {
total += x;
}
return total;
}
>>
>>51543296
Passing an object by reference means you have that object where passing a reference to an object by value means you only have a reference to that object.
Basically, one happens in Java and one doesn't.
>>
>>51543432
>what are negative numbers
>>
>>51543082
this
>>
>>51539495
If you are a faggot dumbass maybe.
>>
>>51543448
I see your point, but isn't it a lot easier to just say that Java only has reference types for aggregation, instead of splitting hairs like that?
>>
>>51543082

auto operator==(const b& other) const { return this == &other; }
>>
>>51543296
Obj obj1;
Obj obj2 = obj1;
foo(obj1);
// obj1 == obj2


Obj obj1;
Obj ojb2 = obj1;
bar(&obj1); // java doesn't have this
// now obj1 might not be equal to obj2
>>
>>51543296
"pass by reference" means you're passing >variables< by reference rather than by their value.
Since Java doesn't do that, Java is "pass by value". Objects are stored as references, meaning that you pass this reference around as a value. The alternative ("pass object by value") would mean the entire object is stored in the variable, and you would pass a copy of the object to functions.

In a hypothetical language:
// pass (variables) by reference
func foo (x) {
x = 3
}
let y = 4
foo(y)
print(y) // -> 3

// pass (variables) by value
func foo (x) {
x = 3
}
let y = 4
foo(y)
print(y) // -> 4

// pass objects by reference (pass variables by value)
func foo (u) {
u.x = 4
}
let v = {x = 1, y = 2}
foo(v)
print(v) // {x = 4, y = 2}

// pass objects by value (pass variables by value)
func foo (u) {
u.x = 4
}
let v = {x = 1, y = 2}
foo(v)
print(v) // {x = 1, y = 2}


MOST LANGUAGES do pass variables by value, pass objects by reference. C# allows for special objects that are passed by value, which is useful for small structures like 2D vectors.
C++ allows for pass by reference or pass by value for everything as long as you specify; the default behavior is pass by value (for variables and objects).
>>
>>51542472
Java's biggest issue is that it isn't C#.
and then C#'s biggest issue is the fact that it's tied to MS, it's probably the nicest language I've done anything remotely significant in

>>51543262
The value is almost always a reference though, whenever you new anything at all, the value in your variable is a reference.
People like to muddle the issue more than it needs to.

of course, the issue is muddled because there are actual differences (if I use the variable I passed the reference value and then point it to a different object, when I leave the function, I didn't actually change the original reference value)

so
public void fn(Object obj) {
obj = new Object("4");
}

public static void main() {
Object testObj = new Object("3");
fn(testObj);
}

testObj in main() hasn't changed at all, you changed the value

if I had
public void fn(Object obj) {
obj.set("5");
}

or something similar that operated on the object, the value doesn't change, the referenced object does

typing this made me realize why shit's muddled
full disclosure: it's been like two years since I've touched anything in Java
>>
File: 1394216198843.jpg (32KB, 433x380px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1394216198843.jpg
32KB, 433x380px
>>51543557
Why don't we just take C# and port it to the JVM?
>>
>>51543557
>being tied to MS is an issue
this is bait
>>
>>51543500
Or you could say objects are only references and all parameters are passed by value.
>>
>>51543565
The JVM probably is incapable of doing most stuff that C# can. Although that's a good point.
>>
>>51543557
imo it's not complicated at all. you pass a reference (which is kinda a pointer) by value. if you don't "dereference" it then you're not changing the actual object.
>>
>>51543557
I do admit C# is better in the majority of cases.
>>
>>51539583
I actually really wanna know. It makea no sense to me
>>
>>51543565
Why don't we take Java and port it to India?
>>
>>51543611
nice baby duck syndrome
>>
>>51543616

It's fun, that's about it.
>>
If yall just open up your java compiler, wrote a shitty program that tests what happens when you try modifying variables/objects, you'd be able to easily see how pass by value works.

Do all of you guys just use books and online forums to learn how your computer works? Programming is the most interactive medium of science
>>
>>51539435
>xamarin and its operations is shit
>what a surprise
>>
>>51539435
>tfw you can't get your D up
>>
>>51543634
>java compiler
i hope you mean IDE
>>
>>51543647

I figured they'd at least have a working distribution network set up so they could get their shitware out there.

But they can't even do that right.

Their jewry knows no bounds.
>>
>>51543432
For (int total = 0; y > 0; --y) total += x;
>>
>>51543664

It's alright. For now I'll still muck around with the VS integration (at least until I can download the MonoDevelop shit).

They'll have it fixed sometime within the next millennium.
>>
>>51543622
Is that meant to suggest I started with Java or C#? Because I started with Java.
>>
>>51543666
Fuck if I care I don't use Java.
Sublime Text and Makefiles have gotten me far in C++ and Python
>>
>>51543565
It would actually be easier to do it the other way round.
The CLR was actually designed so that it could host java apps with minimal translation/emulation.
(Gotta bear in mind the CLR was designed in the days where an MS takeover of Sun was seen likely).
>>
>>51543296
void mutate_val(String s) 
{
s = "val";
}

void mutate_ref(ref String s)
{
s = "ref";
}

void test()
{
String str = "test";
mutate_val(str);
Console.WriteLine(str);
mutate_ref(ref str);
Console.WriteLine(str);
}

The above C# will print "test" and "ref"; you can write equivalent code in C++; you can't write equivalent code in Java.
"pass-by-X" refers to how local parameters of a function relate to the arguments in the caller: if they are *a copy*, it's called call-by-value; if they are *an alias* to the outside arguments, it's called pass-by-reference.
In the above snippet, inside the test() function, we have the variable "str". When we call mutate_val, a copy of that variable is passed to mutate_val and that copy becomes the local variable "s"; when we change "s", we only change the copy of the outside variable str.
When we call mutate_ref, *a reference to* the variable str is passed to the function and it's local alias is "s"; when we change "s", the outside variable changes.

The main confusion regarding "pass-by-reference" comes from the fact that what Java (and countless others) decided to call "reference" is in fact a "pointer". "Reference-type" is just a fancy way of saying "Pointer-type": you have a variable that points to an object. The "reference" in "reference type" is not the same as the "reference" in "pass-by-reference"; they refer to different concepts: the former refers to a pointer, the latter refers to an alias.
>>
>>51543702
But why would you do that? The JVM is the only benefit Java has.
>>
>>51543617
this tqhf
>>
>>51543718
>The JVM is the single redeeming factor of Java
fixed that for you
>>
>>51543565
>>51543702
Mono already supports Java :^)
>>
>>51543729
Basically the same thing.
>>
>>51543703
Nope java has references, not pointers
>>
>>51543718
Serious: What does the JVM provide that the CLR doesn't - given that the CLR/.NET is now being made fully cross-platform.
>>
>>51543819
Faster and better cross platform support from my understanding.
>>
>>51543819
It's commonly accepted that hotspot has the current state of art garbage collector
>>
>>51543819
Since (what I've gathered) it's been less than a year since CLR/.NET has been made cross platform, people obviously aren't going to immediately adopt it (and immediately know about it).
Java has had the goal of being cross platform from the start, >>51543834 is probably correct.
Although if Java dies in the next 5 years I'm going to be excited.
>>
New thread: >>51543878
>>
I wouldn't say that the JVM is faster than the CLR. The CLR permits value types, so can theoretically be much better for your cache (which people hopefully by now know is the biggest bottleneck).
>>
>>51543765
>java has references
Of course.
>>
>>51543425
SAUCE???
>>
>>51543982
allowed

as in its standard compliant to write a python compiler
>>
>>51544145
You can write compiler for any language. What is your point?
>>
>>51544170
No, before python was an interpreted language
>>
>>51544170
It's not necessarily standard-compliant to do so, though.
>>
>>51542166
Thank you for enlightening me sensei.
>>
>>51544205
...
What? Please stop this meme.

>>51544206
Maybe a shitty language would have in the standard something that says "compilers not allowed", but this has nothing to do with static or dynamic typing.
>>
>>51544145
JS is compiled. that doesn't make it statically typed.
>>
>>51544600
>JavaScript (/ˈdʒɑːvəˌskrJpt/) is a high-level, dynamic, untyped, and interpreted programming language.
>interpreted
>>
>>51544904
Stop this meme shit
And see >>51544248
>>
Full dynamic typing is interpreted and not compiled
>>
>>51544995
Retard
Thread posts: 335
Thread images: 17


[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / bant / biz / c / can / cgl / ck / cm / co / cock / d / diy / e / fa / fap / fit / fitlit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mlpol / mo / mtv / mu / n / news / o / out / outsoc / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / spa / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vint / vip / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Top | Home]
Please support this website by donating Bitcoins to 16mKtbZiwW52BLkibtCr8jUg2KVUMTxVQ5
If a post contains copyrighted or illegal content, please click on that post's [Report] button and fill out a post removal request
All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.
This is a 4chan archive - all of the content originated from that site. This means that 4Archive shows an archive of their content. If you need information for a Poster - contact them.