[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / bant / biz / c / can / cgl / ck / cm / co / cock / d / diy / e / fa / fap / fit / fitlit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mlpol / mo / mtv / mu / n / news / o / out / outsoc / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / spa / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vint / vip / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y ] [Search | Click for more| Home]

Anyone here have (or currently doing) a degree in Mechanical

This is a blue board which means that it's for everybody (Safe For Work content only). If you see any adult content, please report it.

Thread replies: 49
Thread images: 2

File: final_project.jpg (35KB, 555x480px) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
final_project.jpg
35KB, 555x480px
Anyone here have (or currently doing) a degree in Mechanical Engineering?

Can you tell me if you guys study structural mechanics at all, and if so in how much depth? Did you do stuff like trusses (pic related), stress analysis, moment of inertia, deflections, loading capacity, moment distribution method, shrinkage stresses, etc at all? If none of that sounds familiar, what did you do instead to calculate that something can withstand the forces it needs to?

I'm thinking of transferring from structural to mechanical engineering and wondering if any of what I've learned will still be useful.
>>
>Hey anon can you help me with my car?
>>
>>47700840
all of that is taught in Mechanical Engineering
>>
>>47700865
Seriously all of it? Great!

Is it a lot different with moving parts? Structures don't move so I've never done anything like that, but I imagine it might be pretty similar with maybe just one or two new things to learn... hopefully
>>
>>47700840
Architecture degree here so maybe not as accurate as Mechanical degree. I did the same shit under the subject "Architectural structure engineering I".

>Did you do stuff like trusses (pic related), stress analysis, moment of inertia, deflections, loading capacity, moment distribution method, shrinkage stresses

I do trusses stress calculation at the moment right now and yes, I'll do topic mentioned above.

>I'm thinking of transferring from structural to mechanical engineering and wondering if any of what I've learned will still be useful.

Don't worry. The fundamental knowledge still apply but calculation for movable part will be much complex i think.
>>
I'm a Civil Engineer with a Structural Engineering masters degree.

It's really different. Since you have to focus on dynamic analysis, therefore need to learn thermodynamics first.

Why do want to transfer though?
>>
>>47700977
>calculation for movable part will be much complex i think.
I've been thinking that too but then again, maybe it isn't that different. It might have more loading states, and stuff like vibration and cyclic stresses, but maybe it's largely the same.

>>47701034
>thermodynamics
yes... but I'm guessing that shares a lot of ground with hydraulics as well which I've already studied a little
>Why do want to transfer though?
there's a lot of industry money going into scholarships in that area right now, and i'm too broke to pay for grad school myself, and it seems interesting
>>
>>47700840
It is tought at the beginning in 'statics'. It's also required in 'strength of materials'. And if you do FE analysis you will need the background understanding, too.
>>
>>47701150
I guess hydralics is mostly fluid dynamics, this will help you here.

Thermodynamics is slightly different, it features gaseous fluids to a large extend (e.g. power plants with steam or engines). But yeah, knowing hydraulics might help.
>>
>>47700840
I played bridge building simulator a lot as a kid!
>>
>>47701203
I guess the main difference is that gases change volume depending on pressure and temperature, whereas water doesn't (well it does a little but not enough that we need to care anyway). But other than that I'm guessing it's probably all the same stuff about flow and pressure and kinetic and potential energy, and maybe a little something new.
>>
>>47700840
I used west point bridge designer a few times
>>
Ah ken tell ye, if ye ken truss mah word
>>
>>47700840
yes all that stuff, plus some circuitry type stuff (AC/DC circuit analysis, transients, transfer functions)
>>
>>47700840
This kind of Mechanics is elementary. I am an undergrad Chemical Engineer and have been taught this and more. We also do similar stuff in Material Science and Technology courses as well as simulations in Solidworks and other software.
>>
>>47700977
They let architects do truss calculations? Normally your job is to make things needlessly difficult. Structural eng here
>>
Space gass
>>
>>47701812
In Japan they do.
>>
I'm a Mechanical Engineer too (plus structures)

My career is in fact Industrial Engineering and the last two years we had to choose between:
-Electronics
-Business & production organization
-power grid networks
-thermal
-mechanical

Anyway my country is shit and I couldn't afford living with an engineer salary 21000€/year before income tax
>>
>>47700840
Mech is awesome. So far I've worked on a boat at sea, at a research station above the arctic circle and in factory machining parts for particle accelerators, and I haven't even finished my master yet. You really have to drill down, file and catalog every piece of knowledge you come across, you never know what will come in handy years later down the road.
>>
>>47700840
We covered all those by second year
>>
>>47700840
Almost finished my Master's Mech Eng OP:
- Your pic related is first/second year stuff
- shrinkage stresses are less focused on in our programme, but we are taught to use them where appropriate and some methods to estimate them
- All other things you named are 1st/2nd year stuff

I really hate that shit so I moved on to robotics as soon as I could

>>47701902
>I couldn't afford living with an engineer salary 21000€/year before income tax
Wow that is really shit, that's what a full time supermarket cashier makes here.
>>
>>47702748
Can you tell me how stress analysis in mechanical engineering differs from structural?
I'd guess you'd have to learn something extra about vibration or fatigue from cyclic loading or stuff like that, or maybe something else specific to moving parts... (and maybe you wouldn't study composite sections or stuff like lateral-torsional buckling as much)
>>
>>47703463
There's no structural engineering at my Uni so I guess it's all combined in mech eng. The structural part is divided as:
- Statics (calculate the forces in your OP pic)
- Structural (elongation, failure, superposition, static and cyclic fatigue, creep)
- Dynamics (Vibration times 100, FEM)
- Mechanical System Design (Bolts, Joints, Welds, Fits (english term? h7/r6 and shit) and how to design those safely (stress limits, welding limitations, best practices)
- Nonlinear Mechanics (tensors mostly, I kinda forgot everything about this shit)

And the other parts are:
- Mathematics part (Calculus, Linear Algebra, Differential equations, Signal analysis and Numerical computation)
- Control theory part
- Solid & Fluid part (Thermodynamics, Heat & Mass transfer, Reactor engineering, Fluid Mechanics)
- Misc courses (Electrical Drivers, Microengineering)
>>
>>47703783
fucked that up, FEM is of course Structural/Nonlinear mechanics. Buckling is in nonlinear mechanics as well, but post-buckling behaviour isn't part of the exam. There's also two courses on Materials, but they're mostly theoretic (molecular reasons for electric conduction and shit)
>>
>>47702748
There are just too many engineers and most new ones are migrating to Germany

I had to work in Marketing strategy and finance to earn more than 50000€/year. It's a shame
>>
>>47700933
when things start moving it's generally means a lot more calculus, a lot of new methods to learn and a few particular cases.
>>
>>47705018
Lol, I'm finishing the remaining part of the Master's soon in a German uni, should I reconsider?
>>
>>47700840
/g/ - Career advice and jobs
>>
>>47700840
Pic related was taught in week 3 semester 1 here. (mech eng)
Im only finishing second year now but weve covered everything you mentioned.
>>
>>47700862
It is sad to see a Mech. engineer who doesn't know how to fix his car.
>>
>>47705442
Right
You're like the guy at parties who says
>wow a technical university you must be able to repair this dishwasher then
>he studies engineering he can help you with your computer
>pff how did you get that question wrong if you're in college you should know that this door uses M3 bolts and not M4

Seriously, get out, college engineering is nothing like being a car mechanic
>>
OP here, LOL at everyone who said "this is all elementary first year stuff m8, I did so much more than this" ... yeah buddy, me too, but I asked specifically about the stuff that I thought might be common between structural and mechanical. I did not ask about element design, bridge construction, bearing capacity or anything geotechnical, or other shit that I already know you didn't do. It's not a contest over who learned more things.

Thanks to everyone who helped, though.
>>
>>47700840
I'm working on my ME senior design project right now

Yes, this is exactly the type of thing we study. For me, it was over three courses -- Statics, Mechanics of Deformable Solids, and Dynamics

Those are usually freshman/sophomore year courses, then you use that material in a sprinkling of other classes
>>
you do bridges in statics
>>
>>47705950
you'll probably be able to transfer a ton of credits. depending on how far you are, maybe a double-major won't be out of the question.
>>
>>47706000
Yeah looks that way. I pretty much already know about half of the topics people ITT have talked about.

>>47705978
Seriously, in dynamics? Surprising, because nothing moves in any of the stuff I mentioned.

>>47705989
Aww, I'm betting that you don't. I'm guessing you do bending of simple beams, and maybe some differential thermal expansion stresses, probably not a lot of material shrinkage stresses, composite section design or expansion joints, and definitely no bridge construction methods, pre-stressing or in-transit loading conditions, wind loading or foundation design at all.
>>
Fuck education and the people who tech it in a shitty and unimaginative way. Regardless of how much I lie to myself, in the end I have to cram the shit out of my books because professors still rely on linear methods of learning.

Fucking faggots
>>
>Anyone doing a degree in Mechanical Engineering
I am. Finishing up my junior year for my Bachelor's right now.

>Did you do stuff like
>Trusses
They were used as an example in some classes, mostly for the purposes of being a good example for an arbitrary system of many parts interacting. Otherwise, building bridges is primarily done by Civil Engineers
>Stress Analysis
That's a bit vague, but yes. Usually it's done in the form of "You have a thing that's experiencing X, how much does it deform, or does it break? How much does it deform within the part?" After doing it by hand for a while, we've since covered how to do this sort of thing with programs such as Hypermesh, as well as Inventor, which can give very detailed information on every aspect of complicated systems
>Moment of intertia
It's a property of the part your observing, it's not really something you "do." If you're using an equation that involves it, you calculate it in about 20 seconds and plug it in
>Deflections and loading capacity
^ See what I said under stress analysis. Though I've briefly also covered shit involving thermal expansion
>Moment distribution method
Yes. A number of my statics classes have covered this, though we never really bothered to give it a name like that in my case. The Wikipedia article on the subject is an accurate description of what I did
>what did you do to calculate the forces it needs to
Really, what you said is accurate, with stress analysis being the big thing. Usually the question being asked is "Does this shit fucking break? If not, how much does it deform?" or "Make shit that doesn't fucking break."

Bear in mind that there are SORT OF 2 sides that describe most of mechanical engineering. Shit related to Solids and statics, as you've described, and shit related to thermodynamics and fluids.

I typed up a brief overview of every major class I've taken, skipping all gen ed things. This is, at least at my school, what one can expect from a mechanical engineering degree.
>>
>>47706614
If I had to study such a dry and tasteless field, I would kill myself and end the suffering.
>>
>>47706614
Continued

As far as switching from one major to another is concerned, really, ask your school advisor. They'll be able to tell you what you can actually transfer over from one major to the other. Even if you've covered all of these things, you still might not have the course credit.
As a general rule, switching in the first year is usually fine, second year is a bit of a hassle, and third year onward just isn't worth it.
>>
>>47706614
thanks, this is really interesting. there seems to be a lot of commonality (except my units didnt have "fuck" in them as many times). but what did you do more specifically to see if shit breaks or deflects, is there something special for moving parts or cyclic loading / fatigue or such? we only did static bending shear and axial stresses, do you guys need something else or is it possible to just convert any kind of action into static forces in a particular element's reference frame at a particular point in time, and then do the exact same thing as for a static structure?
>>
>>47700933
The first post is mechanics of materials, a second level course, the second post would be dynamics, which is similar but more calculus oriented, both are M.E. Courses
>>
>>47700933
When things move you get into the realm of differential equations and usually use some sort of FEA to iteratively solve the necesarry equations (unless it's more of "it wasn't moving and now it's moving at a steady speed of 25m/s"
>>
>>47706841
>He hasn't used Mohrs circle yet
Prepare for fun
>>
>>47708208
Really I dont even have to do that shit on paper? awesome!

>>47708229
we did but only for a little while and it wasnt that fun. in structures really nobody cares about stresses in other directions except axial and shear (which is only toward gravity, nobody cares about shear in any other direction either)
>>
>>47700840

fun times
>>
>>47708401
>Do that shit on paper
You will take a class on transfer functions, laplace transforms and bode plots both on paper and the computer. You will hate it
>>
>>47705664
Any adult male should know how to fix a car. Being familiar with any kind of engineering makes it extra easy.Your other examples are nonsense. Why are you pretending to know anything about it?
Thread posts: 49
Thread images: 2


[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / bant / biz / c / can / cgl / ck / cm / co / cock / d / diy / e / fa / fap / fit / fitlit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mlpol / mo / mtv / mu / n / news / o / out / outsoc / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / spa / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vint / vip / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Top | Home]
Please support this website by donating Bitcoins to 16mKtbZiwW52BLkibtCr8jUg2KVUMTxVQ5
If a post contains copyrighted or illegal content, please click on that post's [Report] button and fill out a post removal request
All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.
This is a 4chan archive - all of the content originated from that site. This means that 4Archive shows an archive of their content. If you need information for a Poster - contact them.