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Does anyone have experience with electric chainsaws? I need something

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Thread replies: 51
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Does anyone have experience with electric chainsaws? I need something simple just to cut up fallen branches and the like. Are they pretty reliable? Bonus points if they're easier to get started than gas-powered models. Any brands to recommend or stay away from?

Also, chainsaw general thread, I guess?
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>>1242582
you're not a man unless you own and maintain a 2 stroke chainsaw.

buy a small husqvarna and be happy.
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>>1242587
I'm totally fine not owning a 2-stroke chainsaw. Not looking to upgrade my masculinity, only clear some fallen branches.

Know anything helpful about electric models?
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>>1242592
no sorry. try >>>/lgbt/
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>>1242601
Kek, you got me.
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Got one (electric Chainsaw) for my mother no joke she lives on a farm motors burn up it was replaced by small Stihl gas model
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>>1242582
Neighbor lives on a small farm and uses his saw all the time. Unfortunately, he had to get a pacemaker and can't use or be near a gas chainsaw. He bought a battery powered Ryobi, and it is amazing! It is incredibly convenient for the exact uses that you describe... I highly recommend it.

TL; DR: Ryobi battery chainsaw > corded electric
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>>1242582
>Also, chainsaw general thread, I guess?

In terms of reliability, anyone have brand preferences? My saw is really showing its age. I spend more time keeping it running than actually using it.
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>>1242613
Why is the battery better than the corded? I don't have a big piece of property, so a long extension cord is more than enough for me. Batteries ain't cheap, and I don't want to worry about keeping them charged.
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>>1242582
They are fine for small jobs just make sure it's from a major brand and you get a second battery. Stihl, Husky and Echo are all good choices. Dewalt also makes one which I've heard is pretty decent. You want to get something that has a dealer nearby so you can easily get parts like a new chain and service without waiting weeks
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>>1242608
They aren't meant for everyday use. They are light duty just like the shit big box stores sell.
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>>1242622
>getting service from a dealer on a chainsaw, further an eletric chainsaw.

are you over 40?
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>>1242617
Just like with power tools all the focus has changed to battery. For the most part a cordless is going to perform as good and usually better then it's corded counterpart
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>>1242617
I guess my perspective is from a larger property, but they are so incredibly convenient. You will be done with the job before you can get the cord out.

The other thing that is nice is being able to work and move around like you would with a regular saw. You don't have a cord getting tangled in everything.
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>>1242624
I own 6 saws and every one of them needs service at some point. After a few years pretty much any saw seeing heavy use is gonna need a new piston and possibly other wear items
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>>1242627
you didn't answer my question.
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Not seeing a whole lot of comparison between them and a regular chainsaw, guessing not many people here have run saws as an occupation. For an urban or suburban homeowner who only gets it out of the garage a few times a year, a corded chainsaw is absolutely fine. No fuel to go sour, carbs to gunk up, or batteries to fuck up. Get a middle-of-the-road or a nicer model though, don't cheap out too bad because the motors on the cheap ones are garbage. You're still going to need bar oil and know how to tension/sharpen/repair/replace the chain. Speaking of a chain, get an anti-kickback chain, there's nothing pussy about it. You're never going to worry about plunge cuts or high depths of cut so it's no inconvenience to you, but it could save life and limb.

There are a few things that a newer saw owner will notice right away about electric saws. They're quieter, which is a plus. They also don't vibrate nearly as bad, which doesn't affect a homeowner much but is nice for a professional.
They're lighter, which is both good and bad; good because they're easy to carry around and use, bad because you can't use the weight of the saw to do work and there's less mass to absorb a kickback.
They're easier to start in any weather--just hit the trigger and the saw runs.
Unless you get one with a fancy ass clutch and/or variable speed motor (high-end models), most electric chainsaws provide consistent, high torque the instant you hit the trigger. While on demand torque sounds good, it's actually a bad thing. A regular saw with a centrifugal clutch and low starting rpm doesn't bite very hard if you breathe on the trigger. If the chain is resting on something or you hold it very firmly (No, don't fucking try it) then it'll just sit there without engaging the clutch. If you accidentally breathe on the trigger of an electric saw on the other hand, it's going to start cutting regardless of what's currently touching the chain.
Cont.
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>>1242663
And the other problem with high torque electric saws is that safety chaps don't work very well. Safety gear is made up of loosely woven cut-resistant threads. When a chain hits the fabric, it grabs the threads which go back into the sprocket and jam it all up. The clutch can't overcome the increased resistance, so it slips and the chain stops moving, preventing you from killing yourself.

Most electric saws, unfortunately, are strong enough they don't give a shit. The chain still picks up the threads, but the shaft and sprocket are turning with such high torque that the threads get sheared and spit out instead of jamming it up.
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>>1242582
https://youtu.be/kzuijFHquQk?t=5m26s

Give that a watch.
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I have a 60v Greenworks. I managed to take down a 20+inch maple tree in my yard with it, although it took 3 charges. Another 3 charges to limb it. Not recommended for big projects like that, but it did work.

Bottom line, they work fine. Don't get one if your primary purpose is felling large trees, but they can get the job done (eventually). They truly shine at limbing, trimming, and yard cleanup, where the instant start, no gas, no smell, no noise and light weight are all huge plusses.

Watch out for battery overheating; these saws are bad at bucking. When you dig in and put a lot of torque on the motor, it overheats the battery very fast, and then you can't charge it for an hour. Let the saw cut at it's own pace and don't lean into it.

For corded, ignore the battery comments, the rest will be the same.
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>>1242582
Yes, simple start (press button), very light and easy to manipulate with.
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>>1242582
They're easier to use and a lot more convenient than a gas chainsaw. They're also waaaaay less powerful. Different tools for different purposes/duty.

>need something simple just to cut up fallen branches

If these branches aren't typically over 6 inches in diameter you should consider a sawzall/reciprocating saw instead. If you go cordless spend the extra money on a quality brand and the bigass batteries, it's worth it.
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>>1242712
>not posting b&d alligator
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>>1242622
>Buy major brand
>Recommends Home Despot's in-house brand

Really?
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>>1242601
Just thought I would mention that one of the best climbers I know swears by his husqvarna electric top handle saw.
The electric ones are getting better.
I still don't own one, but the general rule that good brands are good applies.
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>>1242729
He didn't recommend rigid.

Stihl and husquvarna are always respectable. Echo is fine.

Husky is husquvarna. Calm down.
That man knows what he is talking about. He may have worked with some saws before.
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Got myself a Stihl MSE200 with a 20" blade. Pricey but while last a lifetime. Little to no vibration, decent chain teeth, not noisy. Perfect for around the house or farm jobs. Excluding oil, it cost about 12 cent for an hour of continuous usage here. Husqvarna is also decent. If money is a problem, my only advice is to stay away from the ultra cheap ones. It's a chainsaw and safety is a must. The cheapest ones seems to be made out of dollar store plastic.
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>>1242582
Ive used one before. They work well for sime stuff. If you really only concerned about falling branches then it would be a perfect fit for you . much cleaner and easier to store than a gas.

It's electric all you do is pull the trigger and go
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>>1242663
most of that shit really isn't an issue if you take care of your saw. you should remove the fuel when being stored for a long time but really i've had saws sit for over a year and still fire up just fine.

completely agree going gas is kinda pointless for the homeowner just looking to cut a few limbs or maybe piece a small tree that's fallen. at the same time a cheap gas saw like Poulan would also fit the bill there too. those saws can also be massive cunts but they can be had pretty cheap. i believe TSC(tractor supply) also seems some cheap shit but i have zero experience with them. even cheap saws from the major brands can be pretty shitty. the Stihl homeowners saws are complete fucking garbage these days and you'll be lucky to get a year from it.

pic is a Stihl MS171 i bought just for small shit along ATV trails and fallen branches along my fields. owned it for a month and used about 4 times, maybe 3 hours total. Sithl refused to warranty it. their pro models are solid but if you want a small homeowners saw the best i've seen is Echo since most of their saws have a magnesium housing
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makita circ saw
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>>1242582
Have used a bosch battery one.
>Works fine while cutting
>Low noise
>Low smell
>Short battery life
>Total bitch to sharpen because no clutch
Good for small time use but I prefer my petrol saw.
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>>1242881
You're absolutely right on all counts, I was just assuming OP is the kind of person who will cut up a few twigs twice a year and let his saw collect dust in the garage after that.

I've had the same experience as you with Stihl and echo saws, you should definitely invest in a high-end model Buy once, cry once. I make my living with a 660 and a half-dozen echos of various sizes.
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>>1242890
MS 360 is my big saw. about 15 years old and not a single issue but it can be a bitch to start at times. also have a 260 which has also been good but the air filter cover cracked a few times early on. thinking that was a defect or something since the last time it happened was about 10 years ago.

picked up a Stihl HT 133 pole saw last year when i got the MS 171. that thing is very handy for cutting off branches along the fields but when fully extended it's pretty fucking heavy. i can really only use it for about 20 min before my arms are too sore to keep going. it's also a massive cunt to start. got into the field one day with it and couldn't get it started so i went home to fuck with it. by the time i finally got it running i didn't even want to use the fucking thing. it has the funky 4-mix engine which is suspect is the issue. it is a pretty quiet engine tho

after getting burned on the 171 i went and got the Echo 490. it's been good so far but i've only owned it for about 6 months. it seems to start easier then the Stihls ever did so it's quickly become my go to saw. i'll likely keep going with Echo products for the foreseeable future. Stihl not honoring the warranty on the 171 left me pretty bitter. the dealer didn't do them any favors either, they wanted me to buy the same saw again and use the old for parts
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>>1242729
all the power tools sold at home depot are owned by the same chink parent company... why does it matter the quality is the same
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>>1242906
>why does it matter the quality is the same

Just because you say it over and over doesnt make it true
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>>1242582
>I need something simple just to cut up fallen branches and the like.
Makita UC3530 owner here.
It's not a garden maintenance tool. While it can be used small 0.1-0.3 acre property it is not mobile enough with cord and is not powerful enough with battery. And your safety inspector wont be happy with you chopping off trees with a corded tool.

It's designed for cutting firewood and construction. With good skills you can /precisely/ cut whole pack on 2x4 or siding without wasting time with miter saw.

>Any brands to recommend or stay away from?
Makitas are great. Bosch AKE and Al-ko is not.
Look for a models with longitudinal motor and 30-35cм bar.
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>>1242883
This OP, if you have one already just use a circ saw with a cheap blade. It will atleast restore your manhood.
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>>1242904
>i can really only use it for about 20 min before my arms are too sore to keep going
It's not just you. leveraging the head far away from you is a bitch for everyone. We take shifts being the poor bastard with the pole saw, but it's still the worst tool on the truck. One of our bucket trucks has a hydraulic pole saw and it's really nice, but that's not an option for your average joe.

>>1243003
>safety inspector
The fuck?
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>>1242582
i have a Bosch electric, it's 30cm and works fine enough even for a full day of cutting. It's a lot of plastic and the chain is a total bitch. If it's a one time job rent an electric one or borrow one.

If you foresee more work in the future get a gas one.

also.. don't skip out on gear. at least get the safety pants
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>>1242663

>guessing not many people here have run saws as an occupation

I do. But I have never used an electric saw. Wouldn't make sense for my work
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>>1243095
Same thing, only lighter (if anything it makes it more dangerous) and you use way less bar oil for some reason.
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>>1243096
>>1243095
Oh and it takes you 3 hours to sharpen the chain so you'll end up not using it for 5 years.
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>>1243011
Yeah my grandfather couldn't do much better and he's built like a brick shit house. I almost bought a hydraulic saw that goes on to a loader tractor. It was pretty pricey and the dealer said most he's sold get ruined by falling branches so it didn't seem like good option

>>1243099
3 hours? I can sharpen pretty much any saw in 15-20 min
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>>1242734
>Husky is husquvarna. Calm down.
Anon... I don't know how to tell you this...
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>>1243146

No, he means "Husky" is slang for "Husqvarna". The fact that Home Depot ALSO has a line of tools (though Husky is all hand tools) named "Husky" is just an unfortunate coincidence.
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>>1242582
My cheap Ryobi reciprocating saw does well on branches up to about 6", the whole length of the blade.
My rec would be just buy one of those in a battery class you already have, if you have any battery tools. Almost everybody has a cordless drill these days, just match them.
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>>1242906
Oh... oh... I get to use the image.
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>>1243096

>and you use way less bar oil for some reason.

>>1243099

>Don't use it for 5 years

What kind special chain do you have that doesn't use bar oil and takes 3 hours to sharpen?
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>>1242587
>a husky
Found the gigantic faggot. Get a Stihl, at least those don't slip chains every 5 fucking minutes.
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I bought a Harbor Freight electric chainsaw and used it to chop down the rest of a tree in my backyard. I had family help with their gas saw, and when they left I did the rest with the electric. I live in the city so I don't really have a need for a $200 gas chainsaw. $40 at HF was just fine. I used it to cut down the tree, and then cut up the railroad ties in the pic as well. That's asking a lot of a saw that size. It's not rated for anything near that kind of work, but it got the job done. Granted it burned out at the end and I ended up throwing it away. But it got the job done. The motor was getting weaker, but what actually did it in was the plastic gear inside wore out and they don't sell replacements. The plastic gear drove the chain so it would not spin anymore. Now that the tree is gone I don't have a need for a chainsaw anyway, so I don't care. For all the work that little thing did it was $40 well spent.
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>>1242582
I bought a cheap ass one. Works well for small branches and even some larger stuff. They have fewer teeth so mine bounces a bit.
Still easier to use than dragging out the big guns.
And I can easily climb a tree and use it one handed.
Thread posts: 51
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