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I want to finish the hardwood handle of this knife, but as this

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Thread replies: 33
Thread images: 6

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I want to finish the hardwood handle of this knife, but as this is my first time using anything other than wax, I've no idea where to start.

Looking around google has revealed that mineral oil or paraffin might be best, but it could be better mixed with beeswax; some sites make pure tung oil sound like a very alluring finish to use but the fact that it takes a long time to apply and isn't very durable makes me a little nervous; then there's a myriad of other oils, including polyurethane-based coatings, linseed oil, shellac, and some of them are food-grade whilst some of them aren't and the difference isn't always apparent since some of the non-food grade finishes evaporate when they cure leaving them food-grade...

I'm really confused. Could I get some suggestions on what to use as a finish? The rough idea I had in mind was applying paraffin oil and topping it with some dark restoring wax I've got lying around.
Some water resistance is a must. While I don't plan on letting my knife sit in water, it will be used in the kitchen, so contact with liquid is inevitable. Apart from that, I wanted it to bring out some colour, as the handle has been sanded to what feels like 800-1200 grit and is quite dull.
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Depends how naturally oily the wood is, if its got a lot of oil then you can just use wax over the top and it'll probably be completely fine.
A really good and comparatively messy technique is to use clear drying, high viscosity CA glue, cover the wood, sand it off and repeat a few times and it'll basically plasticise the timber making it next to indestructible, water resistant and still keep its natural appearance. (Just mask off the metal areas)
It will also sand and buff up really shiny

I tend to use spray oil-based polyurethane myself on kitchen knives as its insanely tough, it will make it a couple of shades darker though. If you want to keep it lighter try a water based polyurethane
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Hijacking this thread a bit.

I have oiled a table, but now after a while I want to stain it. Since the stain is waterbased, it won't work, will it?
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>>1238449
Thanks for the advice. Does CA glue bring out some of the pre-sanding colour? I can go find some at my local hardware store tomorrow.
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>>1238427
I do knifes for some time now and am pretty happy with linseed oil.
Also hardwood may mean you schould applie it a few times
It also depends on for what use the knife is intended. Those plastination techniques looks great but i would recommend them more for collector pieces. They get easily scratched.

For general purpose utility knife i would recomment oiling for example linseed oil. The surface will be less slippy and provide a nice grip. Also you may oil it and then sand it again very fine before next oiling(it needs to dry before the sanding). So you get a more smooth surface
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>>1238466
For use in the kitchen. I thought about boiled linseed, but from what I read it takes even longer to cure than tung oil - both of these oils didn't seem like great ideas to me, because I also read that all finishes eventually degrade and must be reapplied, which sounds like a pain.

What are your experiences with linseed? Time taken to apply and the frequency with which you reapply?

I suspect food-safe doesn't particularly matter on a knife handle since it likely won't ever come into contact with food.
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>>1238451
You can do so, but it won't be nearly as effective as if it was untreated.
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>>1238452
It is ever so slightly darker than what it would be unfinished, but it will take on an almost liquid glass sheen if you polish it.

Look for 'thin CA' glue and you should be alright, trick is moving it over the wood quickly and not getting yourself stuck to it. I generally use something like a strip of baking or grease paper to get a uniform depth/coverage.
It will wick into porous wood on its own, so generally takes 2-3 layers.

Make sure you do it outside, its quite an irritant to eyes and probably not real healthy to breath in. Gloves aren't a bad idea either
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>>1238476
Thanks! One final question - how long do you let it dry between coats? I'll throw on a layer, sand it evenly with some 1200 grit sandpaper I've got in the shed, then repeat twice more.

Much obliged for the advice.
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>>1238476
Here's a vid, will be easier for me to type it all out-
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-zQW4GHP9U

You don't really need to get the CA accelerator, its just if you need it dry near-instantly and can wait 10min
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>>1238483
That is a fantastic looking finish, although i suspect it'll take a lot of elbow grease without a spinny-machine. Still, it'll be a fun project.
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>>1238486
Should be easy to get a high satin finish with wet sanding 1200-2000g sandpaper. For polish if you don't have a mop or buffing machine you can get a long strip of soft cloth (tshirt or an old cotton shirt sleeve works great) seat the blade on something, polish on the handle surface and then up and down in a sawing motion across it. Doesn't get into the really tight spaces but you should be able to do most of a knife handle 1/4 at a time (top, bottom, each side)
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>>1238490
Will post results in a few days.
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>>1238427
I use this stuff for knife handles and things for wet environments. It's fantastic.

I made a shaving caddy out of tiger wood (very porous, large grain). I take it in the shower on a regular basis for at least 4 years. No mold, no breakdown of the wood. Have to lightly sand and reapply every 10 months or so.

Here's a pic. There's some soap scum on the bottom and if you look on the inside of the brush holder you can see some color fading because I've let this go too long. But the color overall is still bright, after hundreds of trips into the shower.
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>>1238661
Oops, forgot to say what stuff I was talking about. Polyx-Oil, floor wax. Hard wearing because it's a floor wax. German stuff, very good.
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>>1238427
I'd suggest linseed oil, it's a very durable finish.

Takes some time to harden out indeed, but it's worth it. Reapplying a finish literally takes less than 5 minutes and you'll miss your tool/knife for a few hours max. So i'd suggest linseed.

Also, for the risk of hijacking this thread: I just finished my first restore on this axe. Think it looks alright, could have fixed the axehead a bit better but got bored of filing away the handle. To get back to topic, I really liked linseel oil, even the smell. This is just the first layer of coating, but it works pretty well.
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>>1238427

For utility and carving knives, I run a piece of beeswax over the handle until it has a visible layer on it, then hit it with a buffing wheel on a bench grinder. The heat melts the wax into the pores of the wood and leaves a nice, satin finish with a grippy feel.
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>>1238427
you can make paste wax with mineral oil and beeswax

tru-oil is another option
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>>1238427
this is linseed oil treatement with my methode over several stages.
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>>1238469
pic of nive from >>1238867
is knife after shipping and use by costumer( a friend of a friend )and well didn't got any damage on travel, also depends on wood. i used pretty hard apple wood, you should look that the hendle does nto get wet from water or such for too long i think.
for such woods it takes like 3-5 of procedures i think
i would then and now reapply some oild after a few month or even over half a year.
have another knife with cherrywood grip and it just stays smooth and shiny and i never reappleid it for a year or such. also it depends on the intensity of use.
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Alright, so I got some advice from my boss regarding this; said tung and linseed oils are great choices, but they're not very durable, and that a PU finish would be ideal since it'd produce a better colour than CA. Brought home some non-yellowing polyurethane satin normally used for concrete (we work in a business that produces both water- and solvent based floor coatings, varnishes etc). Added a little silicone to prevent fisheye, and am brushing it on every hour or so. 3 coats in right now - here's a progress shot.

Colour's really starting to pop out now - I can see the grain again, and the wood is starting to shimmer at different angles. I didn't expect such a great turnout, to be honest. Better than expected.

Wish I could take a clearer shot, but I'm just making do with a galaxy S7 camera and no knowledge of how to make it look good.
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>>1238870
I usually wouldn't criticize peoples grammar skills online, and I wont start now. Good day sir.
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>>1239236
oo u a funny little fuck knuckle aintcha
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>>1239175
polyurethane is nice if you like blisters on your hands. It all comes down to whether or not you want something more comfortable to use, or something that looks prettier.
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>>1239237
I have been known to be quite funny at times, yessir.
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>>1239238
I'm sanding it with 1200 grit after i'm done and applying wax over the top; I'm hoping it won't be like grippy plastic
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>>1239175
>makes thread to ask for advice
>gets good advice
>ignores all of it

c
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800-1000 grit sanding Linseed oil and sealer
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If youre actually using the knife for butchering game then rough sand it and rub it with boiled linseed oil every couple weeks. If its just a kitchen bragging device then sand to 5000 grit and polish with paper, then rub with hot bee's wax and bake at 200 you can also do this to the blade if you want it black.
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>>1239388
I know first-hand how tough the finishes we produce at work are, and they're free for me. Can't beat free.

>>1239683
5000 grit? Will it just fall out of your hands when you try to use it?
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>>1239943
>doing it right vs using wrong product just because it's free

the options suggested are not ridiculously expensive, and even a small amount will go a long way

I have made my own handles for knife blanks, and used several different products based on recommendations from people who have far more experience than I do
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>>1239968
>using wrong product
Why do you have this opinion? The product is both durable and colourful. It's exactly what I wanted, and it's free.
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Another question; I don't have a lathe, so buffing out the sandpaper marks is going to be a real pain. I've got some green jeweller's rouge I use as a conpound for stropping; would that on a rag make it a little faster?, or am I doomed to jerking off the knife's handle for an hour with a cloth?
Thread posts: 33
Thread images: 6


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