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redpill me on Accounting /biz/.

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I just got accepted for 2 year Accounting and Business Admin diploma.

What is the grunt-level accounting work day like?

What would I be doing exactly? Staring at paper 8 hours a day doing basic math?

Where is accounting on the corporate ladder? I've heard that it's the most no-nonsense business field, but it's very lower-middle rung.

How big of an improvement is this from flipping burgers and lifting boxes?
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>>969420
>I just got accepted for 2 year Accounting and Business Admin diploma

Enjoy like $30-40k/yr salary tbqh.

The work is too simple and there is too much competition, you need to go to a normal 4year college so that you can actually get your professional designation later.
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>>969424
In my city I don't competitionand prestige/having a proper degree isn't really an issue. It's very much polytechnic sort of city.

This 2 year program is pre-CPA certified and is very much geared towards people who want to get a diploma -> work 2 years -> upgrade to the CPA.

Once I have the CPA I just won't be restricted to this city.
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>>969440

I'm going to assume that you are based in the US, if not then the following is meaningless.

Is your college regionally accredited? If not then you are screwed. Nationally accredited and "tech" schools generally will not be able to transfer their coursework to 4-year universities (which is required for CPA). Also, the degrees mean less.

>This 2 year program is pre-CPA certified...

pre-CPA certified is a meaningless term. 24 credits of accounting courses from most institutions will count toward the CPA exam requirements.

>...and is very much geared towards people who want to get a diploma -> work 2 years -> upgrade to the CPA.

CPA isn't an "upgrade". In the US you need 5 full years of college to even sit for the exam (150 credit hours), as well as a couple thousand hours working under a CPA. It can't even be "well I took 150 credits." You have to have at least a bachelors and some even go for a masters before taking the CPA. The exam itself is actually a series of multiple exams that each must be passed for certification, then licensing.

>Where is accounting on the corporate ladder? I've heard that it's the most no-nonsense business field, but it's very lower-middle rung.

It depends. Accountants range from those who do accounting itself, taxation, or wealth management to making up a large number of CFOs in large businesses. The value in accounting is in the knowledge of how a business functions, essentially taking the pulse of the business.
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>>969489 (Cont.)

>>969420

What is the grunt-level accounting work day like?

At the two year level, a lot like book keeping, but there can be variety. The last time I bought a car, it was a 2-year accounting degree holder that did all the paperwork for financing and such.

>What would I be doing exactly? Staring at paper 8 hours a day doing basic math?

This depends on the work environment. Someone with a 2-year accounting degree would most likely be working with lower level finance situations, like the previously mentioned car lot. That said, you'd probably be able to get a position in general business or HR with a degree too depending on what you want to do.

>How big of an improvement is this from flipping burgers and lifting boxes?

Accounting is one of those things that really pays well if you have a CPA or at least bachelors, but is shitty if you don't.

You are better off getting a 2-year degree in IT/Networking or Nursing if you want something that will be immediately useful and well paying.
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>>969489
>>969505
I'm Canadian, but you're right, a bachelors is a requirement for a CPA.

My diploma credits will count towards a Bachelors of Business Administration.

The only good way to spin this situation is to get the diploma, work as a grunt-level accountant getting experience and saving up to get my bachelors, then I'd go back to get my bachelors, and then I'd work some more, and after 6 years I'd be able to get that shiny CPA.

Since I can't really afford a bachelors and the time in between making money is valuable, I'll go with it.

If it all seems like a pointless grind at some point in that long-crawl to a half-decent career, maybe I'll try and become an entrepreneur or something.
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>>969683
>I'm Canadian, but you're right, a bachelors is a requirement for a CPA.

What community college? Pretty sure none count for CPA credits. You need a bachelors and 51 credit hours to even qualify for the CPA exam.

If i were you I'd probably just do some community college programming thing, unless you were dead-set on becoming a CPA.
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>>969683
150 credit hours is required to sit forthe CPA. That's more than a BS.
>Bachelors of Business Administration
good luck passing the CPA exam with that kind of education
>>969420
>2 year Accounting and Business Admin diploma

You wouldn't be able to find an actual "Accounting" job with an associates degree in accounting. You could probably be a manager at a mcdonalds though. OR a bookkeeping accountant at some business that has yet to enter the 21st century.
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>>969683

Hate to burst your bubble, but business administration degrees have one of the lowest returns on investment because they tend to not be rigorous and are ubiquitous. Everyone and their dog has a bachelors in business. In the US, general business degree holders on average make less than those who studied areas such as history or philosophy.

If you are going for anything, then do something that is targeted. Finance and Accounting are in business, and they have their own career paths (with some cross pollination) that leads to much better outcomes as far as pay and career opportunities (via CPA, CFP, CFA).

If you want to start your own business, then there is little point getting a degree outside of saying "I have a degree." Classroom knowledge is helpful, but far from necessary.

Really, the issue seems to be figuring out your skill set, and what you actually want to do with your life. What are your motivations? How much do you want to work? How much do you care about making, and how much do you value your free time?
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>>969685
http://www.nait.ca/program_home_77693.htm

Holy fuck, you're. The more I think about this the more of a mistake it seems to be.

Maybe I should just do Computer/IT.

http://www.nait.ca/97114.htm?searchType=combined&PCSubject=Computers%20%26%20IT

Which 2-year or bachelors looks like a general IT or programming diploma/degree? I'll pick my own diploma/degree, but I'm a bit confused by all the different IT and CompSci programs.
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>>969683
Get something with hard skills like an engineering degree and then get a top MBA later.
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>>969489
>CPA isn't an "upgrade". In the US you need 5 full years of college to even sit for the exam (150 credit hours)
I don't know about other states (or more so don't care to know), but Florida allows you to sit for the exam with 120 hours, as long as you've taken enough business and accounting courses in those 120 hours.

You need 150 hours to get certified as a CPA.
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>>969707

Looking at the offerings you provided, many IT careers are very strong choices. They also will likely be long-term careers, as low-level book keeping and accounting might be eliminated as technology advances.

If you are going into IT, just find something that you like to do. Networking pays well, though fields that involved more "true" engineering such as electrical/electronic tend to be a lot more difficult course wise.

IT is a bit different than many other fields, as certifications can mean as much as degrees, and many times work experience is king. Getting started, you might want to look up a book in CompTIA A+, then Network+ or CCENT. Those certs tend to be very strong starters, which would go well with a 2-year degree/diploma (and they might already be part of the programs).

Some other programs that looked good from the main list were things like respiratory therapist or medical sonography. I know sonographers can get paid $60,000+ in the US.
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>>969707
What is your long term career goal?
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>>969699
I'm only qualified to flip burgers and lift boxes now. I just wanted to get into skilled white-collar work.

I can do just about anything if I have the training. I was looking for office setting work as a 'cubicle bean' and I thought accounting was it. I also wanted something that was transferable across country and internationally. The city I live in is a boom-town and I've never been into the lifestyle promoted in this part of the country.

I thought the diploma would lead straight to CPA which is why I thought the diploma and accounting in general was such a good idea, but I was horribly wrong about that. I blame the college for advertising 'pre-CPA certified' which is what confused me.

Anything with decent career prospects will suit me better than an accounting-business admin diploma now.

I'd prefer to do a 2-year, but I'm willing to take out the loan for a bachelors now if it can lead to a decent career.

I don't want to do my bachelors at a polytechnic to be honest, so if I could do a 2 year at the polytechnic and work for a bit and continue the other 2 years at the city's university that what I would want to do.

I guess you guys should redpill me on Information Technology/Programming/Computer Science now.

I believe IT is working with software, hardware and assorted clerical duties, keeping computer networks and servers in working order. Programming us writing code and creating and managing software and websites [how many languages does a 'programmer' work in?]. Computer Science is the broader field both IT and Programming are in, and includes robotics [related to mechanical engineering], creating and managing hardware [computers, servers, et cetera] and a few other professions.

From my temperament I'd probably be suited to programming, but I'd assume workplace needs would call for IT. I would love to do either frankly. I don't know about pay and hours, but I just want a career path that won't leave me up shits creek without a paddle.
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>>969731
I just want to get into skilled white-collar work. I want a career path that can be transfered across country and internationally. I'm a /his/ sort of person and I don't feel like Edmonton is a city for me in the long-term [beyond my 30s].

A lot of people come here to start their career but their intention isn't to stay here, so it isn't uncommon. I basically just want a skilled white-collar career that I could do in this city, or Ottawa, or Hong Kong.
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>>969744
I wouldn't go with accounting if you're just going to go to a community college.

Just do some programming meme thing at community college + do opensource projects and stuff like that. Would be your best bet if you're only sticking with an associates degree.
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>>969744
>beyond my 30s
I mean I want to be in another part of Canada [or another country if the right opportunity presents itself] before I'm 30.
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>>969741

You need to check how accrediting works in Canada. I'm from the US, so I don't actually know about your circumstances. Here, most technical schools will grant degrees, but no 4-year colleges will accept them as they are considered less robust. I actually knew a guy who got an associate degree in IT at a career institute then applied to a major state school. They told him he would have to start all over. He makes $9/hr. to this day. You need to be 100% sure that your degree and credits are accepted in all provinces as well as in major institutions of learning.

IT in general covers tons of areas. Networking, security, repair, servers, desktop admin, all would be under that umbrella. Many people specialize to their areas of interest by getting certifications towards their areas of interest. This is where you get the alphabet soup of CCNA, A+, MCSE, and things like that.

Programming is programming. You write code. I have a friend who has a B.S. in computer science (which is programming) and math. He calls me if his computer is acting up because he wouldn't know the first thing about fixing a hardware issue.

Engineering tends to get more toward the design end. Here you actually learn the hardware itself, CPUs, circuits, etc. I have a friend in this too, but fuck needing Calculus 3 and linear equations.

Right now, things like Security are hot, and IT is pretty stable. There is a worry about outsourcing with coding and eventual self-writing code.
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Seriously, starting to realise that all the degrees that I would have like to have done but I thought were useless [history, philosophy] seem to be better han wasting my time on a 'practical' business education.

I could become a CPA just as easily getting a Bachelors in English or History as I could doing getting an 'Accounting' or 'Business' education.
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>>969754
Fuck it. I'll just do my bachelors at the university then. No point going to a polytechnic to get into white-collar work when it has absolutely lousy career prospects.
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>>969755
>I could become a CPA just as easily getting a Bachelors in English or History as I could doing getting an 'Accounting' or 'Business' education

No you couldn't.

You need CPA-accredited credit hours and you need actually knowledge of what Accountants are and do. Make no mistake that English or History is the worst possible degree you could get.
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>>969764
You could also go to community college -> university after.

You sound like you're unsure of what you want and what you're capable of, so it might be a better idea instead of putting down thousands upon thousands of dollars and being left with nothing.

If you with Community College:
- Can possibly transfer credits(depends how much but you can ask your prospective university after)
- Is Somewhat valuable on your own even if you don't choose to pursue university
- Inexpensive costs

At least you'll have something to fall back on if you decide you don't like it or can't study for whatever reason.
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>>969744
Definitely get a 4 year degree in a useful skill - accounting or engineering or something similar. It will pay off very well. If you do go to community college for cost savings you should follow it up with a transfer to a university.

If you kick ass at your job after school you can really consider a MBA if you're interested in climbing the corporate ladder.

I'm at a M7 MBA program right now and the job opportunities being thrown at us are ridiculous.
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Alright, I've gone back to the drawing board and decided on a viable career path. I'll do:

http://www.nait.ca/program_home_76373.htm

For 2 years. Work a year or two and go back to get:

http://www.nait.ca/program_home_78657.htm

I'll be skilled in both hardware and software; I could do programming or IT. I'd have a bachelors, and it'd be in a fiels where employers are interested in your genuine ability and not what school you went to.

Programming is the same in Canada as it is in Argentina or Israel, and I'd have IT skills for an office environment.

I won't be looking back. This field is the modern equivalent of being a scribe preserving important information and ideas in Latin. I like language learning and I find math stimulating, programming is like a marriage of the two. I know a little about hardware but I know I'll loads to learn

I've done it /biz/. I've figured out what I want to do with my life [or at least the next couple of decades].
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>>969943
Good job bro. You've listened to my suggestion.
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Accountants: the registered sex offenders of the business world.

People do accounting not really for the money, but for the security, because they feel like they lack power - sex offenders rape people not for sexual pleasure, but to feel powerful.

Do you enjoy accounting? You're a fucking psychopath, go see a doctor.

Does accounting pay well? Not really - some faggot from high school works at Chipotle and makes more than some other faggot I know who is an accountant at KPMG. Sure, as you get higher up you make more money. But you'll only be spending that extra money on psychiatric medication and your tasteless BMW 3 series lease that screams "validate me".

Look, you're gonna bust your ass in accounting, but for what? To be a fucking pussy in a cubicle your whole life? Put the effort into something else that actually matters. Double major in some kind of engineering and also marketing, and take entrepreneurship classes, take philosophy classes, take cognitive science classes to "learn how to learn" even more. You'll learn how to build and do awesome shit that interests you, but in a way that can be relevant to some sort of business model.
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>>969953
>some faggot from high school works at Chipotle and makes more than some other faggot I know who is an accountant at KPMG

Yeah I don't believe that.

Accounting pays quite well and with a professional designation it's one of the easiest routes to $100k+ salary. You also don't even need to work in Accounting, you learn how businesses run and it's applicable to everything in business really.

>Engineering
>Less autistic than accounting

"no"
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>>969948
To be honest, I've just realised that the only decent programs NAIT has are Tech and Oil related.

A 2 year accounting diploma that can't eventually lead to a CPA or a bachelors is absolutely useless. You'll just be working long hours for shit pay with no hope of advancement unless you start all over again from square one.

Another benefit to going into a genuinely technical field is that I can actually make shit, which is great if I ever want to do anything entrepreneurial. There a countless times I've been on the internet, computer, interactive tech that I've felt the experience was lacking and could be improved, and every one of those spontaneous and authentic moments is an entrepreneurial nugget in the prospecting pan of life.

I could make the next 4chan. Maybe I'll get to make that perfect videogame I've always felt was out the but that games developers were too tunnle-visioned to see.
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>>969973
>Another benefit to going into a genuinely technical field is that I can actually make shit, which is great if I ever want to do anything entrepreneurial. There a countless times I've been on the internet, computer, interactive tech that I've felt the experience was lacking and could be improved, and every one of those spontaneous and authentic moments is an entrepreneurial nugget in the prospecting pan of life.

Exactly muh nigga.

That's why it's a much better choice, it's really flexible and while you might not learn all that much it's still helpful if you do look for a job. And at the very least if you feel it's not for you, you can always go to University afterall, losing a limited amount of money.
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