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Anyone here experienced with trading/collecting art? I have

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Anyone here experienced with trading/collecting art?

I have a few contacts to the lower-tier art world through my parents who are very into it, but not multimillionaires. I've been very interested in art for a larger part of my life, although I used to scoff at modern art- something that changed over the past 3 years. I guess it might be an acquired taste. But let us look at the purely financial aspect: how does one get into it without a 100k$ investment? Do you include art in your portfolio? Do you collect? Do you keep up?

Two years ago I bought a few books on contemporary art, including 2 on the financial aspect. I'd love to get involved in this business as a side "hobby/job". How would a 20-something with a decent engineering job do it?

Any tips/ thoughts?

>pic related is Italian Futurism
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>>1346380
modern art
>art
>degenerate mixture of colors
pick one
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>>1346443
It's what the people with money care about.
I respect realism more than modern art, but modern art can be aesthetic, too. I bet your desktop background is minimalist and not the Mona Lisa.

Thing is: new realistic art is worthless. Only new approaches sell. only interesting artists sell, less their brush strokes.

People want to hang up those degenerate mixtures of colors. The Jews shilled this art for ages and so it's the art that sells.

You don't even know how deep the rabbit hole is
https://shape-and-colour.com/2008/05/16/murakamis-my-lonesome-cowboy-15-million/
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>hurr durr it's not a portrait so it doesn't mean anything
please don't get into art
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>>1346456
my desktop background is a photo
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>>1346380
I love boccioni
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>>1346490
Said no one in this thread.
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>>1346380
If you buy established artists, you won't get very far with 100k, but it would be a pretty safe investment.

If you buy newcomers, you can start with a couple grand, but it's a huge gamble.

There is a huge influx of artists in our time. Everyone thinks they too can be artists. The trick is finding the right person. You need someone ambitious, then they'll do the promoting for you. Catch them early, when they first appear at group exhibitions or straight out of the academy. If you read a piece about them in some local newspaper - great, it means they have media connections and know how to generate attention.
I take it you're an engineering wage slave? If you're self-employed you can always serve artists and take works as payment. Young artists usually have more artwork than they'll need and not enough cash to get by. Back in the 80s and 90s my father was in IT and got some pretty neat paintings and sculptures to repair shit for artists. I also know a couple of printers who have huge art collections. It's a brilliant job that many modern artists need (photographers, digital painters, etc) - "I print your 5 pictures and only charge you materials, but one goes into my private collection..."

The indirect way is to find gallerists you trust who will introduce you to promising artists. An additional middleman is obviously more expensive but you'd be working with an expert.

All the big collectors usually specialise in a certain style, period, technique or location. You need to get pretty deep into certain types of art to properly judge potential and quality. It also helps with networking if you stick to the same-ish cirlces and everyone knows you're the X-guy so they'll send every X your way.
The specialisation is also due to taste. All the collectors I know and many I've read about say, the basic rule is: Only collect what you personally like and want to look at. Probably helps with staying on top, judging and not caring if prices don't go up.
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>>1346587
Great input, thanks for your long reply.

I'm a wageslave, indeed. But I doubt anything I do could be of use for them, besides my earnings.

How would the newcomer generate profit? Would he simply invest in art and wait a decade, hoping for the best, or is it worth the effort to actively sell the art either through a middle man or even by renting out a gallery-like space once a year? To own a gallery would obviously be too expensive for a part-timer while renting a real gallery is also expensive, depending on location (heard they want a 40% cut + a fee). How to monetize the art?
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>>1346657
>How would the newcomer generate profit?
>How to monetize the art?
You don't. You collect. Maybe you'll swap and if one of your protegees has become particularly big you might sell off one or two of his works to finance the acquisition of multiple cheaper works of young potentials. To amass a fortune with art you pretty much have to be an obsessed collector, not someone who just thinks about future profits.

If you're only in it for money and profit - for god's sake, don't deal in any physical objects! You need to purchase, transport, store, insure, present, sell them, all in a market with little turn-over and a few monopolists (auction houses, galleries, art insurers). It's a huge pain in the ass! The same way you wouldn't do speculative investment in physical gold. Put your money into an art-themed investment fund. That way you can at least claim to own part of a Damian Hurst or a Jeff Koons.
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>>1346380

Out of interest, which books did you read that covered the financial aspects?
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>>1346890
https://www.amazon.com/Fine-Art-High-Finance-Economics/dp/1576603334/ref=pd_rhf_gw_p_img_8?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=B9NQM8HSGC8SXN1ZFFP8

https://www.amazon.com/Art-Market-Research-Methods-Sources/dp/0786466715/ref=pd_rhf_gw_p_img_10?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=B9NQM8HSGC8SXN1ZFFP8

It's of course geared towards the "prosumer".
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