[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / bant / biz / c / can / cgl / ck / cm / co / cock / d / diy / e / fa / fap / fit / fitlit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mlpol / mo / mtv / mu / n / news / o / out / outsoc / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / spa / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vint / vip / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y ] [Search | | Home]

Any business majors here? What's it like? I'm thinking

This is a blue board which means that it's for everybody (Safe For Work content only). If you see any adult content, please report it.

Thread replies: 6
Thread images: 1

Any business majors here? What's it like? I'm thinking of going into finance next year.
>>
I have a degree in banking and finance. For me it was absolutely terrible, I didn't enjoy most of it. Half of the subjects are braindead "memorize this" courses that you'll forget one semester later, one quarter accounting and another one math applied in economics. This last part can be pretty interesting if you have an interest in finances, capital markets, banking and/or general economy, but it just wasn't for me. Accounting is objectively boring and uninteresting and no one can convince me otherwise. You must have some knowledge about it if you're going to work in the field though, it's pretty much the language of business world.

The program is not too hard, but it's definitely not a walk in the park either. If you don't have some interest or passion in math or economics you will struggle with it and you'll most likely grow to resent it.

The jobs involved are also pretty shit, at least in my opinion. Most people who get this degree end up working as financial/data analyst, accountant, auditor, tax adviser, stockbroker, functional QE, actuary or risk manager. These are all jobs that involve no creativity and creation whatsoever so you're pretty likely to end up hating life after 10 years in the field. You can definitely get a good paying job with low stress with this degree. Special mention is actuary, which is considered one of the best jobs out there, but you will most likely have to do a masters for it too (it involves a lot of math) and I personally find it boring as hell.

What I'm getting at is that it's a field that not many people can find passion and meaning in. The pay can be good, but you're most likely to get a high income from something you're passionate about anyways. If you really have a a strong interest in the field then sure, go for it, but if you're just doing it for the money or because "I might as well chose a major" you should reconsider it. These were the reasons I went into it and I regretted it. I ended up changing the field anyways.
>>
>>18151127
>These were the reasons I went into it and I regretted it. I ended up changing the field anyways.
What major did you initially select?
>>
>>18151161
You misunderstood me, I went into finance from the start. Finished the degree, then ended up learning and working in programming.
>>
>>18151168
Oh ok, how are you liking it? I hope that I'll have enough time to learn programming while I'm studying. Seems like a great skill to have regardless of what one plans on doing in the future.

Also, how was the hiring process?
>>
>>18151210
I like it. I'm not sure this is what I want to do for the rest of my life, but I can certainly say it stimulates me and I find some joy in it. I'm currently thinking about doing a master in cybersecurity and see where it takes me, but I also developed a strong interest in psychology lately and it's certainly a field I'd like to work in, but I feel like it's too drastic a change and quite risky. Although I digress. Point is, I like it, but I'm still not convinced this is my "calling".

I'm not going to lie, the hiring process was painful. My first job was in auditing, I got that with absolutely no issues and no effort when I was in college. But my programming job took a very long time to find. After I quit the auditing job I spent about a year learning programming on my own from books and online courses so I had a pretty big gap on my resume. I had to send A LOT of resumes applying for entry-level positions and internships. I had a few interviews but failed the first few horribly because I had some gaps in knowledge, as you'd expect from someone learning by himself. I eventually got my shit together, got a decent knowledge foundation and got an internship that turned into a full time job after it ended. It took me about 6 months to get a job since I started sending resumes, but I definitely do not regret switching the field.
Thread posts: 6
Thread images: 1


[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / bant / biz / c / can / cgl / ck / cm / co / cock / d / diy / e / fa / fap / fit / fitlit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mlpol / mo / mtv / mu / n / news / o / out / outsoc / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / spa / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vint / vip / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Top | Home]
Please support this website by donating Bitcoins to 16mKtbZiwW52BLkibtCr8jUg2KVUMTxVQ5
If a post contains copyrighted or illegal content, please click on that post's [Report] button and fill out a post removal request
All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.
This is a 4chan archive - all of the content originated from that site. This means that 4Archive shows an archive of their content. If you need information for a Poster - contact them.