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ESL TEACHING THREAD
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ESL TEACHING THREAD

I teach English at an Elementary School in South Korea. 23/m/Aus.

I mainly did it to live abroad instead of paying $1500 everytime I wanted to leave Australia for a holiday.

Stats.

Live in Seoul.
20 mins from downtown in a nice little middle class suburb.
My apartment and return flight are free.
I get $2200 a month AUD (which is $1600 USD or 1,100 GBP)
Minus 250 of that for health insurance, pension, and daily cafeteria meals. I get pension back when i quit (90 a month for as long as i stay).

I live in a small 1 bedroom, 1 kitchen apartment that is tiny. On the plus side, Korea has heated floors, and my monthly bills (internet, cable TV, electricity, gas/water, maintenance) total to $70.

I can travel to any part of Korea with subway, Bus or speedrail within 4 hours.

The women are the most beautiful in the world.

The service is amazing. E.g Fold Delivery, like fried chicken, can be sent to my house at 4am on a monday, or at my work place desk (literally to my computer, in my office, on the third floor, in room 301), or to the middle of the grass in the park where i'm having a date by the river.

Subway is fast, clean and cheap.

I have a mountain behind my school, one of the biggest in Korea. I can hike up there and breath clean air.

My elementary students are cute, smart and disciplined. I let them fall asleep in class because they study so hard at after school classes until 9pm sometimes. They never disrespect me.

I can try answers any question regarding working abroad in ESL, especially in Korea.

Let me help you live in Korea
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>>1066828
an esl thread already exists on /tv/:
>>1063204
>>
That's a pretty shitty salary senpai.

How did you get a job in Seoul as a young and new teacher? Usually it's pretty competitive to land a job there. Then again I guess no one else wanted to accept that low salary, lol
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>>1066834
All of us have salaries like that, it's actually pretty standard for the first year. Also, his apartment is included. Everything is cheaper in SEA. I make less than him and live a very comfortable life.
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I'm an ESLfag in Japan. Did the Korea thing for a year through GEPIK, basically your arrangement, OP, except at junior high. Would have stayed another year except GEPIK slashed the middle and high school jobs. But I like Japan more anyway so I guess it worked out.

So GEPIK is still going on, huh, OP?

I'll be in Tokyo for another year until the end of my visa, then I'll get my state cert and either teach secondary social studies in the states or just fuck off to some Gulf State and make a bunch of dollars at an international school. Feel free to ask me anything about Korea and Japan ESL. I genuinely enjoy teaching. I especially like junior high kids.

>>1066828

>My elementary students are cute, smart and disciplined.....They never disrespect me.

Haha, man, my junior high kids didn't respect me. But they did like me. We had a good relationship.

>The women are the most beautiful in the world.

Lel, opinions I guess, as I have mine. Personally I find Japanese women overall better/less samey/more variety and better personalities. Only real demerit compared to Korean is the crooked teeth on a surprising number of Japanese. Like it's not a meme, haha.
>>
>>1066847
I will add to this by saying that I've actually reached a point where I think the crooked teeth is kind of cute. But only on Asian girls. I'm not a yellow fever guy but it's unacceptable on white. Ditto pubes. Okay, sorry, I'll stop transgressing. Please ask me anything about ESL in Korea or Japan.
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I fucking wish I lived in Seoul, I'm stuck in a smaller city near Busan instead. Hongdae is the best place I've ever been. That said I only work 2-8:30 on MWF and 3:30-8:30 on TT, guess there's an upside to having low enrollment.
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>>1066834
You're damn right it's low. That's why after this contract ends this march, i'm cashing in on my exit allowance, severance, pension and housing refund and heading back to Australia (after i trabel through japan for the 5th time in 12 months).

In Australia, i'll just get a CELTA and start making 4k a month at a language school teaching 18-29 year old students "intro english" or "ielts prep". I'm so happy with that salary, and if i can get a night job, i can make 8k a month on both jobs. awwwww yis. Love me my australia.

>>1066847
I wish i could teach in Japan, but i'd be just as broke as I am now. Plus i've been there extensively, and probably can't handle the ESL type pressure that comes with those language school jobs. And i don't want to live in the country, personal choice i guess. Good for you though. Legit happy for you.
And yeah GEPIK is actually still going, but was merged with EPIK. So now they're doing Gyeonggi too. I went with EPIK and chose Seoul. Luckily i submitted my application at 12:01 on August 1st. I was the 4th application in. A lot of Seoul teachers live on the outskirts, but luckily i live near Digital Media City. 40 mins straight to Incheon, 15 to Gimpo, and 4 stops away from hapjeong/hongdae. So lucky. My friend got placed in Itaewon. Her apartment is above a bar. Lel.

And btw, i totally agree. Japanese girls are all round perfect. Koreans are nice compared with everywhere else (except their shitty personality), but Japanese girls trump any ethnicity. I date a japanese girl and it was the best 12 months of sex in my life.

Ps, how are you teaching in Japan? Should i follow your direction and work on tokyo? Whats your pay and rent situation like? Where in tokyo are you? Worst thing about tokyo/why are you leaving?

>>1066854
Public school life.
Mon - fri. 8:40-4:40. No pressure. No management issues. No need to deal with parents. Easiest/best job.
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>>1066854
daegu? if so, my ex is going there. any thing worth saying about it/what to expect?
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>>1066862
>No pressure. No management issues.
Wow best job ever. Why is it that most ESL teachers don't stay in this job forever. I think the only issue is living overseas plus no pay rise.
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>>1066862
My hagwon is one of the good ones actually, I've never had to deal with parents and the management is fine.

>>1066863
Nah by small city I mean 200 000 people. I went to Daegu for a weekend, it was good but the two bigger cities are much better.
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>>1066865
Everything makes me want to stay, except the low pay (the day before my paycheck, i'm usually down to my last 50...because i cannot save money well and 2k a month sucks for me), aaaaaaand next year, my co-teacher will be the same...and her in particular i cannot stand. The others are great, but they're transferring schools.

Other than that, best job! 21 days vacation. Not including weekends obviously. So many 3-4 day national holidays.

I went to jeju, busan, gangwon, japan x4, china and next month i'm going to japan and the phillipines.

Meanwhile, hagwon only get 5 days.
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Op
What qualifications do you have?
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>>1066867
If I were you I would stay. Such stress-free jobs are very rare these days.
This is why I don't get why most ESL teachers return to their homelands. I mean, some of these guys have degrees where it will be hard to find a job which pays extremely nicely. The salary of an ESL also allows you to live comfortably, yet a lot of people on this board are like "it's not enough!".
I really don't know if these ESL teachers' standards of living will be higher in their homelands. I mean, chances are they will end up in a more stressful job. But I guess a lot of people forget that money cannot always buy happiness.
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>>1066869
Bachelor of Film + 120 i-to-i tefl certificate
1 year non-professional volunteer work with children in Australia (not required, but helped me get the job)

>>1066868
Did you see my other post? I can make 4k a month working the same hours but with older students in Australia.

There's no growth in the job in Korea. After 5 years, i only go up $600 a year to 2.6k a month.

This esl job is only for a few years so you can travel, get basic experience teaching w/o the pressure, appreciate a new culture, get out your country that you've been in for over 20 years.

The only way to stay in Korea/japan, is to have a Masters Degree and get a job at a university. Or work at an international school. And those are hard to get. but hey, just my opinion. I'm interested in investing, and i'm going to get a home loan next year and buy a house.

Korea's pay is perfect for a chill easy life and a lot of travelling in your break time. Perfect for people on this sub who want to make money and travel easier in asia, instead of 2-3 weeks at a time per year.
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D-did any of you have sex with your 17-18 year old students

what would you do if they came on to you
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>>1066874
No tldr didn't see your other posts. I thought you said "everything made you wanted to stay except for the pay"?
Isn't Australia saturated with teachers at the moment? How hard is it to find work at an int. school?
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>>1066862
Hongdae takes me back. You'd like Shinjuku Golden Gai (assuming you've never been there) if you're a Hongdae guy.

>Ps, how are you teaching in Japan?
Came in working for a language school company. Currently unemployed and looking for a new job.

>Should i follow your direction and work on tokyo?
I guess only you can make that choice.

>Whats your pay and rent situation like?
My last job was about $2500USD equivalent in yen. At that time I lived in an apartment that cost about 500USD in the western burbs. Now I actually live in the city, but pay 300USD because I'm with a roommate.

>Where in tokyo are you? Worst thing about tokyo/why are you leaving?
I live in Nerima-ku. Worst thing about Tokyo is how crowded it is, plus the price of public transportation. I'm leaving because basically I don't want to be that guy who does this forever. I've been at ESL about 3 years now and I'll be 27 in a couple months. I'm getting up there. I'd like to make more money. And really I have a strong urge lately to teach junior or senior high school civics or history.
>>
How about Taiwan? How does it compare to Korea and Japan in terms of lifestyle, girls, etc. You don't hear people talking about it as much but it seems similar to Korea and Japan.
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What are my chances, really?

>singaporean
>chinese ethnicity
>degree in graphic design
>have part time work experience with a company that brings students on field trips

I just received a rejection email from JET programme today ;_; my english is excellent, my grades in university are terrible though. D's and E's. I'll graduate in june this year. Probably just scrape by with a pass / ordinary degree

I want to end up in kansai, japan preferably. i speak enough japanese to get by if alone in japan. W-what do? I will be applying for interac next but i would like to know other alternatives.
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>>1067064
Try AEON or ECC? ECC is the better choice but apply to both. If you have 12 years of education in English you don't need to be a native speaker. But you'd probably have to go the US, Australia or Canada for an interview.

Why have you done so inexcusably horribly in university? I'm pretty sure all companies look at your transcripts, so that might be an irreversible stain.

You could also try other companies like NOVA or Berlitz, but by all accounts they are much shittier than ECC or AEON.
I've actually heard that iTTTi "Peppy Kids Club" is a decent option, if you don't mind teaching just little brats. I've heard they pretty much hire anyone.
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>>1067070
>Why have you done so inexcusably horribly in university?
The honest reason - i suck at my major. I did a diploma in another field of visual design before going to university. Due to other complications of the local education system the only subsidised degree i could be admitted into is graphic design. everywhere else rejected me.

Also i go to a school where they care more about how you think about visual design than how good the visuals look. I only know how to make things look good. I fail everything despite trying really hard ngl. Maybe i should have done a degree in fine art instead idk but that's not subsidised so it's bloody expensive and for other many reasons it's just very unwise.

I'm mentally prepared to pass with all D's by the end of the degree. But i am very sure i'll pass the degree.

How fucked am i with these grades? I want to teach english in japan for a year to get my japanese good and then look for art related jobs. I am genuinely hardworking and earnest and Not Dumb but these grades make me look like some lazy dumb fuck!

Pic related to prove i dont suck at art
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>>1067064
I think you got rejected because of your race.
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>>1066828
Dude, that was a wicked op. It was enjoyable to read
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So practically every ESL teacher I see on /trv/ has been in Korea, Japan or SEA.

Any experiences of people outside those areas?
I'm getting ready to move to Mexico and try and find ESL work in DF or Puebla, I speak fluent Spanish, have a Bachelors Degree and am finishing up an online TEFL certification (they're pretty bullshit, I know, but apparently just being certified, regardless of the quality is a huge boost in getting hired in latin america).

Anyone taught in Mexico or CA/SA in general? stories?
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>>1067146
same here. seems pretty happy, sound like a cool dood
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>>1067256
My sister did Italy and it was fucking unbelievable. She was teaching two kids of a fuck-off wealthy family and had this huge apartment in the most picturesque fucking little village I've ever seen given to her for free, in addition to a solid salary.

I'm tempted to do something similar- teach in a Western, non-English country, but then I am a stereotypical Japanophile in all but appearance, so going to Japan isn't something I want to dismiss out of hand.
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>>1067256
would like to hear from these peeps too i want to teach in Brazil
Thailand, Japan and some eastern euro nation like Hungry or Czech republic are also in my interest range
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I've been offered a job for South Korea to work in the Gangnam district but I declined it and opted to work in Kuwait. Interested in going to South Korea next year though. Is the teaching mainly to children (elementary level) or to high school kids?
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>>1066828

What organization or program do you recommend looking in to? What should i avoid if im offered a contract?
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>>1067326
What are your qualifications?
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>>1067329
companies are garbage and they will steal your money
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>>1066828
Do you know any Korean?
How did you converse with the locals?
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Bumping this thread for general interest.
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>>1067329
If you want a safe and and stress free public school job, search for EPIK.
If you want to work at a private after school academy, search Hagwons in Korea. You'll have more stress, bad work hours and pretty much no night life if you work a Hagwon. But the pay is a little better, not enough to justify the suffering tho. Your manager will rip you off or fire you if you suck/parents complain, because "you're an english teacher and you're east to replace".

>>1067459
I knew VERY basic korean before i went. I learnes the alphabet in a few days, and then when i arrived, i knew how to say the basic expessions to introduce myself, and some key expressions for your school life.

But, after 1 year, without any sit down study and purely through day to day immersion, i can now understand and speak a lot more. I can comfortably get around and live here. Just gotta love languges, like i do.
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It's my first year and I make 2.4million won teaching here in Korea. You found a fucking low paying job OP.

Also in my opinion the food in the bottom part of korea(Busan/Gimhae/Tongyeong/Changwon) is a lot better than Seoul food. Cheaper too. Though it depends if you like spicy/salty.

Seoul is nice but too much of clusterfuck for my tastes. Namsan tower was beautiful at night though. Would recommend. Also the traditional village area is kinda cool if you like historical shit. Itaewon was cool too.

The girls are nice but don't think most will look like kpop stars.. When I fucked around there was just as many average looking girls as there was in any other country I've been to.

There are some real qt3.14s though.

I'd recommend finding a korean girlfriend for anyone wanting to have additional cultural experience.(Thank god my gf doesn't like the cheesy fucking couples clothes.)

I'm planning ongoing to Russia or Ukraine next anyone got experience with that? Hoping to live in St.Petersburg
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>>1067741
There's good hagwons out there if you look bro.
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>>1066847
Hi anon I just about to start college and plan on getting a bachelors. I heard about the JET program a few months ago and I'm really interested in getting in if I can. What are some things I should try to start doing to prepare for this? I'm already learning some elementary japanese and I already volenteer regularly.
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>>1067751
Not OP but clearly you are working at a hagwon no? That sounds like standard hagwon pay. Public school jobs are a lower salary on paper, but after you factor in the free apartment, pension refund, flight refund, completion bonus and the fact that it's a comparatively fun and stress free job, it's much better.

>>1067752
Most of the good hagwon jobs are just passed on through contacts and connections. There really truly aren't that many hagwon opportunities that aren't your standard shitty hours work on saturday shitty boss 10 days of vacation situation.

One option is to look into a Christian place. There are a lot of Christian hagwons/private schools that are decent if you are Christian or don't mind pretending to be. They tend to treat their employees a little better, being Christians employing fellow Christians.
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>>1067754
Haha, well I think you're definitely thinking far ahead but I guess there's nothing wrong with that. I have no direct experience with JET and never applied, but I've known some JET people. I think some general advice would be to keep your grades up, show a genuine documented interest in Japan or if not in Japan at least in other cultures and countries broadly. Perhaps more importantly, I think you will have an advantage if you can show a documented interest in teaching. So if some of that volunteer experience you're doing is like a kids after school/rec center kind of thing, or volunteer teaching some kind of class, that would go a long long way.

I would say don't worry about "wowing" them with the essays. That's pretty much impossible. They're heard everything, and the content of the essays is pretty much going to be same-y. Just make sure it's competent, immaculate in terms of spelling and grammar, flows nicely and is clear.

JET jobs are cushy and overpaid, so JET is somewhat competitive. Good luck.
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Currently teaching elementary in Seoul. My job is based, sometimes I only teach one 2 hour class a day. Moving to Japan soon to live in the countryside. ESL life is pretty good except it seems I can never make romantic relationships stick because i'm moving all the time.
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>>1067756
Jesus what country did you visit?

Standard hagwon intro jobs (read:shitty) tend to be around 2.1 and teaching from 9-6/7 split shift.

I make 2.5 and teach 4 hours a day and that is seen as the very high end of the spectrum until you get into f4 level jobs.

BTW it is pretty much standard in a hagwon to get flight, apartment, and bonus. (50/50 shot on the pension though)
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>>1067741
Is it possible to get a contract in Korea/japan/Vietnam without a Bachelors?

Is there a certification that would bypass a BS degree? Recommended savings going in to a contract?
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>>1067768
maybe vietnam, but without a degree you have no shot at teaching in Korea or Japan unless you forge it (which people used to do in korea like a decade ago before they clamped down hard).
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>>1067771
What degree would be quickest and most relevant for a career in ESL? I assume an English degree would be quicker than a CS degree.

Its my understanding that you will need a BS and a certification in order to apply for these jobs at all?
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>>1067777
Any degree, but english/esl/education
would probably help you the most.
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>>1067777
What did you do before you started teaching ESL?
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>>1067326
>>1067332
Again, what's your background that you had the options of the Middle East and Asia off the bat?
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>>1067781
>>1067784
My mistake.
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>>1067785
>>1067785
Not the person you're addressing, but for Asia basically you just need a bachelor's degree. For the middle east you generally need a master's or state license but not always. Usually they're not so much looking for ESL teachers in the gulf states, because the English ability there is generally pretty high. The jobs are more for teaching math, science, etc. Normal subjects.
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>>1067756
I found my hagwon at Daves ESL cafe so i don't think connections or contacts are necessary.

My boss has lived abroad and is familar with western work expectations.

He went through great efforts to make sure my living situation was comfortable. Really kind guy.

I work 3pm-10pm
2.4mil

All the public school benefits are the same as hagwon benefits if you don't find a shit job.

The whole "hagwons are terrible" thing most likely stems from lazy fucks who do no research finding their job.
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>>1067799
Sounds like better than most, but you still have to work at night, and on Saturday most likely.

Also, I don't believe that you get as much vacation as a public school job.
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>>1067283
Any more info on the situation with your sister?
Sounds too good to be true
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>>1067785
Bachelors in Biochemistry
CELTA
3 months experience of teaching English
Native English speaker from the UK
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>>1067996
I wamy to find a local opportunity for teaching ESL before going overseas
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>29 years old and teaching English

fuck my life. how did I end up here
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>>1067999

I got lucky. Where I live there are quite a lot of immigrants who struggle to learn English. So the local council decided to set up a company for people to teach them English on a voluntary basis. So I did that. When they found out I had a CELTA, they were very accomodating and wanted me to teach for a long time as most teachers hardly had any teaching qualifications. If you search around, you should be able to find something on a volunatry basis.

>>1068000

Surely its better than being 29 and working a shit job, at the bottom of the ladder with no opportunities to even advance?
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>>1068034
>Surely its better than being 29 and working a shit job, at the bottom of the ladder with no opportunities to even advance?
Isn't that the situation he's in, though?
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>>1068040
Not really. Assuming he's overseas teaching English, he's got the opportunity to learn additional languages. If he hasn't been lazy, that is. Foreign passports are also rather useful to companies. ESL teaching might be a bottom ring placement, but the idea that you're fenced in forever is only true if you have literally no other skills.
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>>1066874
Hey anon. I'm doing the i-to-i course too. Started last week and I start an internship in a fortnight.
Is there anyway we could arrange for you to help me out ?$
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How I imagine teaching ESL would be for me
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-5UMCMR1MY
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>>1068000
I'm 31, in a good job and I want to teach English for a while to screw around...grass is always greener...some days I worry I did it in the wrong order...other days I feel lucky I can go off to do this and have a good job at the other end
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I'm teaching english full-time (kindergarten aged kids), and find it pretty fucking miserable. I don't know how some people have the energy to do it, but then I'm naturally introverted.

Since this is 4chinz I'm guessing most of us are introverted anyway.

But anyway, this shit has me so fucking miserable. Even getting laid with exotic Asian poon on my off days doesn't ease the pain.

How do you guys do it
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>>1068550
Teaching is not for every one. I love it
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>>1068550
Where at?
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>>1068550
Switch to adults or if you have a real skill learn the language and start applying for jobs. The most difficult part is being legally allowed to work in the country. Once you're in its usually not that hard to switch to something completely different
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i love working with children but i hate dealing with people that don't speak english. how proficient are the kids you're teaching?
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>>1068550

This is why I taught first in the UK before planning to move. However, I've not taught kids so dreading that.
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>>1067803
I don't work Saturdays ever. Public schools get more vacation.
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>>1068650
So you're at one of those places where the Korean teachers at the hagwon are forced to work Saturdays while the foreigners get off?
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>>1067064
Doesn't matter if you have shit grades as long as you have a degree. You don't really even need a TEFL as far as I remember. (Or a degree in some cases.)
There are loads of places you can get jobs. I used eslcafe.com.
While it's true that there are schools in Asia who want a white English teacher, there are loads of guys of Asian descent doing it and if you try to actually do the job, they will probably end up liking you more than the white teachers.
Worst case scenario, you have to first get some hands-on experience in places where it's extremely easy to get hired like China, outside Beijing and Shanghai, South Korea (as far as I remember) and South East Asia. Once you've got a little bit of experience, it's easy to pretty much pick where you want to live in Asia.
Your first employer may try to rip you off a bit, pay you a relatively low salary or whatever... welcome to the world of work. As long as you can survive okay you'll still have a good time and after that first year you'll know what you're doing and be able to negotiate a substantial raise (or get a different company to pay you better).
I would avoid agencies unless you really need someone to hold your hand. They will rip you off. Better to just apply to schools direct.
Good luck with it bro

>>1068000
Hey at least you got trips.
But ESL is a pretty good life in a lot of ways. Unless you think life is a "who makes the most money competition" in which case, you're still relatively privileged in the grand scheme of humanity.
And if you're bummed out about your status anyway then stop being miserable and make something of yourself; learn a language, get certified to teach then work for a proper international school or start a business or something.
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>>1068550
I taught ESL for about 6 months and I used to dread teaching the little kids.
So I got a job where I was teaching teenagers: problem solved.
8 years down the line, international school and doing okay.

Make the most of that poon while you're over there. Getting laid with passable Western chicks in the West is a lot more work.
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>>1068685
>Make the most of that poon while you're over there. Getting laid with passable Western chicks in the West is a lot more work.

Dude, fuck off.
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>>1067963
It really was. Unless she was blowing the host on the sly, that was really what it was. She did need some references, but, er, let's just say they weren't too thoroughly checked (she didn't lie per ce). She DID get lucky, but having accommodation and a salary was pretty normal among other people in similar situations she knew.

And I imagine, seeing as I'm from London, my idea of a 'fucking huge apartment' might be different from yours. The salary was relatively small, but seeing as how accommodation was provided for free it went a long way.
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>>1066828
>>1066847

How did you start? The very first steps... Where did you apply? Did you chose the school? What papers/certificates do you need? What papers certificates do you need if your native language is not English (but EU citizen)?

Thank you, in advance
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>>1068778
i forgot to add that I'm more interested in Korea, and I have an intermediate level Korean.
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>>1068563

How does one switch to adults from kids? Won't it be complicated if you don't have much experience?
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>>1068653
Correct. My boss and co-boss work 6 days a week.

I work 5 days. 3pm to 10pm. No lesson planning. One on one interviews. Job is kinda piss easy but I like working with kids and teens so go figure.
>>1068685
Shit game man.
standard Loser Back Home
>>
>>1068784
>I have an intermediate level Korean.

Is that her?
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>>1068795

Haha, i would put this 'her' to the "advanced" category.
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>>1068681
>Or a degree in some cases
Care to elaborate on this? I think for Japan and Korea as a bare minimum you need a degree for the visa. Even if the school itself doesn't need it.
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>>1068706
Why?
>girl like sex
>guy like sex
>they sex
>>
Anyone here know if they can teach English in Japan or South Korea with a three year diploma from Canada. Even if your not from Canada it's good.
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>>1067064
I'm Korean with a degree in lolanimation and I got accepted for the interview. From what I've read, it's all about having a good personal statement that covers your weaknesses as well as letter of recs that vouch for your character. I made sure to build my application around working with kids. Best of luck to you.
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>>1068000

whats so bad about teaching english? I'd give anything to have the confidence to teach
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>>1066984
Taiwan is like living in western Japan, but with Chinese instead of Japanese writing.

Moneywise, you'll make around 1500~1800 USD/Month. Unless you're living in the capital Taipei, saving 1/2 of it or more is easy.

The food here is cheap and amazing. Get some 刈包 or 小籠包 and thank me later.

Weatherwise, 75% of the year is sun and warm/hot. Otherwise rain.

The people here are the friendliest I've ever met

Transportation's easy. High speed rail can take you across the island 2 hours or less. All major cities have MRT lines/Bus lines that can get you around easily. Most cities also have public bikes available as well.

Lmk if there's anything else you want to know
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After my first trip to South America (Ecuador and Colombia) I am interested in teaching ESL and living in Colombia.
Anyone know what the chances are of getting an OK job without a Bachelor's? I will have an Associates of Business degree within the next few months.
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So is it possible to teach English in another country with little experience and no further education?

For various reasons I won't get into here, I left education after high school and therefore have no degrees. Most adverts for placements I have seen require you to have some kind of degree(even if it's not related to teaching or English). I understand their reasoning, but is it possible to get a placement without one?

I have some experience working with children and I have no problem learning the native language of that country before I left, but is there anywhere that would take me?
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>>1068882
What kind of diploma? Is it considered a "bachelor's degree?" If not it doesn't count. For example, like a technical certification doesn't count.

>>1068988
95% of jobs and almost 100% of halfway decent ESL jobs require a bachelor's degree. You cannot teach in Japan or South Korea or Taiwan but maybe some shit job in China or SEA might be available. Not really sure, but I know for a fact for Korea, Japan and Taiwan you are out of luck.
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>>1069014
>What kind
It's an Engineering Technology diploma. It's considered more than a technicians and less than an engineer. I have talked to the Japanese Embassy about getting a visa with my diploma and they said yes. But I feeling they might not understand my diploma. Even if I do get a work visa with it. The jobs available ask for a degree no?
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>tfw these people actually HAVE jobs

You guys don't realize how lucky you are to actually make it as an ESL. I have 5 months left of highschool, 2 weeks until college applications are due and I still have no clue of what I want to do after I graduate.

All I've ever wanted is to travel to Korea and find a way to live there.

How do I end up where you guys are? Canada is a frozen hell hole and I want to get out as soon as possible.
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>>1069034
1. Start researching what jobs foreigners can get in Korea other than English teacher, major in the highest paying/least sucky/most in demand one, minor in Korean.

2. At some point in school see if you can somehow intern over there in college, if not, try to study abroad there.

3. Finish college and go over there degree in tow. Try to make it in whatever industry you picked. If the job sucks switch to English teaching. By that point you'll be old enough to figure out what to do on your own anyway. Hopefully you picked something that isn't just marketable in Korea just in case your sated yellow-fever doesn't fill the hole in your cold Canadian heart. Also, find some constructive hobbies while you're stuck in Canada.

We have different goals & stuff but that's the plan I would have given myself 6 years ago. Also, enjoy the the plenty of time everyone's saying you have now. It goes from that to "you don't have your shit together yet?" overnight.
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>>1068975

how are the girls in taiwan? easy or hard
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>>1069074
If you are normie who gets his share of play at home, you will do just fine with women in East Asia, perhaps even a little better than at home. If you are a goose-y moé neckbeard beta who thinks going to Asia is going to fix all his problems and make him a lady killer, you're going to be disappointed. Beta neckbeards will probably find it easier to get a girlfriend in Japan, Korea, or Taiwan than back in their home country, but temper your expectations and don't think you're going to get an idol tier girl just for being white. It's not going to happen.

>>1069034
>Canada is a frozen hell hole and I want to get out as soon as possible.

Having lived in Korea, I can tell you that in Seoul, the climate is much like Toronto. Winters in most of Korea are quite cold and snowy. The Southern tip of the country by Busan is noticeably more temperate, but Korea is not so different than Canada in this regard.

>All I've ever wanted is to travel to Korea and find a way to live there.

Why exactly? Why Korea? If you're thinking with your dick and this is related to yellow fever, I can tell you that there are many nice Korean and Chinese girls in Toronto and Vancouver.

>How do I end up where you guys are?

By getting your degree in 4 years and then going to teach ESL. With a degree it's pretty easy.
>>
I always assumed that you needed a CELTA or similar qualification to teach English overseas, but looking at this thread that doesn't seem to be the case. Is there much value in taking one of those courses? I have a bachelors in geography and philosophy and am a white native speaker, would this be enough to get a job? What about in other regions like South America?
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>>1068988
do some ESL tutoring in your city or whatever big city you live by
this is a list maybe you have seen it for no degree potatoes like yourself
http://www.internationalteflacademy.com/blog/bid/74176/No-Degree-No-Problem-The-6-Best-Countries-to-Teach-English-Without-a-College-Degree
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>>1066848
Agreed. The teeth thing is cute on some asian girls.

The pubes thing... Well not all of them go full bush, girls i have dated from japan and korea trim and shape it to a respectible shrub. Full bush is a fallacy.
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>>1066862
Totally agree.

I had a jap gf for a few months until she moved back. The best sex I've had and she was only 21.

Plus super clean, charming, and well presented.
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>>1068882
If by 3 year diploma you're talking about bachelor's degree from Quebec universities, then yes.
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>>1069165
I think I'd go with Nicaraguan
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>>1069216
Yea it's from Quebec. But not from a University. It's from a college (Cegep).
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>>1068879
>>1068988
Technically, you need the degree. But "technically" is more flexible in Asia than in the West. I knew several guys in China who taught ESL but had no degree. And definitely heard about it elsewhere in Asia.

The first job will probably be relatively underpaid - but you're in. If you aren't liked, you are vulnerable to just being told to fuck off one day and you have no recourse at all, but if you are polite and try, nobody will care that you don't have a degree. As you gain respect, salaries increase and as you make connections you may get better opportunities from other bosses who know how to get around the rules.

Important: your boss has to be a local. Foreign-owned schools that try to get away with that shit always get busted, usually sooner rather than later.

The best strategy for degree-less teachers is get a job where the boss can get you a proper visa. Usually not in first-tier cities until you have some experience in Asia and know how to talk to the people. Then try to get as low official hours as possible and work hard at building relationships with private cash-in-hand tuition outside of school.

>>1068785
Nothing to it. Just apply to jobs that are advertised as teaching adults. Say you've done a bit of it at your training school. It's not like they're gonna check! Then work hard at the start and you'll be fine.

>>1068706
>>1068790
Fuck both of you guys, too.

Was only trying to cheer Brendan Fraser up but your self-righteousness got in the way.

>>1068790
And by the way, while you're calling me a loser and showing us all your moral vanity (so good of you to stoically never bang hot girls) you're doing exactly the same shit with your 'I have an easy, privileged existence because I'm a Westerner' at your job. Your job where you have no prep and the Koreans work Saturday while you get the day off.
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>>1067963
Not the guy you asked but I've met quite a few girls who have done the "au pair for the super rich thing" and know one quite well. Important word here: girl.

Unless you're a girl yourself, I'd reckon you probably aren't getting one of those jobs. While a non-negotiable requirement is always native English so that their kids learn to speak English well, the parents want girls to teach it to them. Ideally bubbly, pretty, fresh-out-of-university girls. Never heard of a guy doing one of those jobs. Not saying it's impossible - just never heard of it.
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Teaching at a uni in China. Found the job through an agent who hires all of the school's foreigners (only me right now since it is a small uni). He says he will hold onto my insurance card, which he bought and signed me up for, instead of sending it to me. Lives in the same city an hour/two away from me. Has been really great (both the agent and school) this first term, but this set off some alarms. Is this something I should be concerned about? Rather, is there any reason I should not be concerned about this?

I know agents are scum. I am asking "why". He has sent me scanned copies of the card, of the insurance fee. All of it looks pretty legit.

But his reasoning sounds really fucking lame.

>We have to keep the original copy of the insurance card for you because we shall use it to ask for compensation for you from the insurance company in case something really happens to you.
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>>1069595
>I know agents are scum. I am asking "why". He has sent me scanned copies of the card, of the insurance fee. All of it looks pretty legit.
he probably sells insurance information to people or something like that.
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>>1069595
Insurance on what? In any case, sounds dodgy af.
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Advice please someone need help urgent.
>2 jobs in china
1. Dalian
>Pay from $800-$1200 usd depending of performance
>Apartment set up for me but I must pay rent
>Suggest that I come with at least 1500rmb so the rent must not be so high
>School hooking me up with a free meal every day most likely shit school food though
>Apartment right near school so no travel expense
>Have to be there by Feb 28th so a bit more then a month to prepare
>6 months
2. Beijing
>Pay a meager 2500 rmb an month
>Apartment set up already no rent or food expense
>A week of training and I get a TEFL certificate for free.
>Free airport pick up ( I expect this shit any way)
>They send me off to another city but no idea where I would end up spending 5 weeks without pay the first month due to training

What do? I'm leaning a lot more heavily towards Dalian since they they are willing to pay so much more and I'm thinking that I can set up a standard pay of at least 1000$ a month they both have me working 5 days a week 9-5 but doing that for 2500rmb a month sounds like slave work. Even if I got the base price in Dalian is would end up being the same thing.

The issue is that I have not taught a class since highschool and I have told both jobs this the dalian job was willing to hire someone with NO teaching exp at all before me so I don't think it will be too much of an issue but how can I prepare?
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>>1069595
Really weird most people ask you to buy insurance before you come I never heard of them buying it for you on location.
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>>1069475
Dude banging hot girls is great. I was just calling you a loser because you can't get laid back home. I'm curious can you even connect with girls that speak English fluently?

Nothing wrong with utilising your strengths Korean pussy is great. Western white privilege is potent.

And no I don't feel bad about my Korean workers working Saturdays. They get paid more but you wouldn't know shit about Korean work would you? I think you've been speaking out of your ass for far too long in this thread.
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>>1069733
>Being this mad
>Can you even connect with girls that speak english fluently
Not even him but after having both a lot of people tend to prefer one or the other. Calling someone a loser because they are not fucking a certain type of girl is asinine. It's pussy either way it seems like you are grasping at straws for insults.
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>>1069709

2500 RMB? Are you fucking kidding? There is no way in hell you'd be able to survive on that in Beijing.

Sorry, but idiots like you are the reason why these arrogant subhuman chinks think they can take advantage of foreign teachers. NEVER accept low salaries like that, you fuck it up for the rest of us already working in China. Jesus.
>>
To any experienced EFL teachers out there, need some advice:

I have been offered a job teaching English for the Kuwait air force in Kuwait. The prime contractors and main employers are called Raytheon, based in the US. The subcontractors (and the ones I had interviewed with) is berlitz bahrain. They used a recruitment agency called international teachers plus. Now the job starts in March, but I have to undergo two weeks training in the US at the Defence Language Institute. From there, I fly out to Kuwait and do a few weeks training and then start the job. Since I was offered the position (on 29/12/15), I have received a letter of offer that was promptly signed and returned via email. I have also attested my documents (cost approx £290) and have had a medical certificate from my GP (£30). Since the letter of offer, I have not received an actual contract from the employers nor the subcontractors. I got in touch with the recruitment agency who said that a contract should be any time soon, but due to the lack of contact and updates, I'm getting quite concerned about the position. Without a signed contract they could turn around and say they don't need me or the position is no longer available.

I was offered a job in Japan that I turned down for this job, who sent me a contract a few days after the interview, so I don't see why its taking this long for the contract to be sent.

Experienced EFL teachers, does it take long for a contract to be sent? Is a letter of offer enough to know that I've deffo got a job in Kuwait? Should I be worried that I've not received a contract yet?

This is my first EFL job so I don't know what to expect. Is this normal?
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>>1069766
>Experienced EFL teachers, does it take long for a contract to be sent?

This is very specific to your job and your employer. if you're worried I'd suggest phoning them again.
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>>1069374
Then that won't work. They explicitly ask for a University degree.
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>>1068795

very underrated post
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>>1069759
>you fuck it up for the rest of us already working in China. Jesus.
Always, don't do this, don't do that. It's the free market. Suck it!
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>>1069374
God damn it. I did talk to the Japanese embassy and they did say it will work. I just have a feeling they made a mistake.
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>>1069794
>>1069903
>Replied to myself
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>>1069080
What is up with Asian-Americans thinking that anyone non-Asian that finds Asian girls attractive has "yellow fever". You tell a Japanese girl in Japan that you think a lot of the girls are cute and they get extremely happy
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>>1069678
>>1069704
>>1069711
Here is his follow-up email, which has me completely convinced he is fucking me over.

>Yes, you are a bit mistaken regarding the insurance because this is the first time you are experiencing a full time position in China and I am sorry I have forgot to inform you before.

>Actually this insurance was just bought according to the requirement of the government which only requires foreigners should buy inpatient medical and accidential insurance. It means this insurance shall only cover those who are inpatients due to serious illnesses or accidents.

>It is only a basic one ( no work permit can be issued without it) , not one covering all cases, such as catching a cold or being feverish etc.

>Yes, in case you are serious ill or come across an accident, you have to inform me the first minute, and I will show this insurance card to the hospital the same day you become the inpatient.

He has been great so far, and he is responsible for all of the school's foreign hiring (and I really want to work here again next year). How do you suggest I proceed?
>>
I really late to this thread but I am an English teacher in Vietnam, I have been living here for 3 years and I am engaged to a local girl. I'm probably going to be staying here forever. If anyone has any questions let me know.
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>>1069988


Is it possible to work there with a fake degree? do you need it notarized and need proof of education, or can you just email them a photocopy of a fake degree
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>>1069988
Thinking about just flying to Vietnam and looking for esl work. I want to teach adults. Can you tell me what documents I should have in hand to work legally there when I arrive. How hard it is to find work as a walk in? I'm an American, native speaker with 2 years experience teaching in South Korea.
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>>1069988
Thinking about just flying to Vietnam and looking for esl work. I want to teach adults. Can you tell me what documents I should have in hand to work legally there when I arrive. How hard it is to find work as a walk in? I'm an American, native speaker with 2 years experience teaching in South Korea.
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>>1069996
I have never met anyone who hs worked with a fake degree, if you get caught you will probably get arrested, fined, deported, and blacklisted from teaching at anywhere reputable again.

Every job I ever worked at wanted a notarized degree and I'm pretty sure they called my university to double check.

It is possible to work at some shady schools without a degree, but you will get paid very little and they will treat you like a dog, would not recommend.
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>>1069997
You should have a notarized original copy of your degree and recent clean background check. Everything else is optional but helpful, references, health records, make sure you have multiple copies of all your paperwork, visas etc.

I have never taught adults, it's harder to find a job teaching adults, the biggest market is children, teenagers and college kids. Usually you just answer job ads or just show up and ask if they have any jobs available. But this will be harder with places for adult students because there are not as many of them.
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>>1070005
Do they give you insurance and all that? How are the hospitals and dentists? I'm attracted to it because it looks like the money will just allow a pretty comfortable lifestyle there. It looks like residency long term isn't really encouraged for foreigners though.
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>>1070002

seems like youre lying t b h fa m. why would any legit teacher with a BA want to teach in a shit hole like vietnam for 5 bucks an hour? you'd literally make more working in fucking mcdonalds or wal-mart.

there's gotta be thousands of people working there without degrees
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>>1070029
>a shit hole like vietnam

Have you ever actually been to Vietnam? There are absolutely worse places.

And I swear you're the same guy who just keeps parroting the "ESL teachers make less than McDonald's employees" line. Give it a rest, man.

(Btw, I'm not the guy in Vietnam).
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>>1068891
>I'm Korean with a degree in lolanimation
I'm an Australian and my dream has always been to do animation ;_;
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>>1070029
Maybe do some research, the average esl teacher makes 20-25 dollars an hour. And yeah there are people working here without degrees but they makes like half of what people with degrees make and they work for shitty schools in shitty locations.
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>>1070019
The thing about insurance is, in Vietnam you are most likely going to be working part time for several different schools instead of full time for 1 school. Thats just how it is here unless you work at a university.

But if you have a work visa you are entitled to use the Vietnamese health care system for almost free. I have never had a medical emergency here so I don't really know how good the hospitals are, I assume they are not as good as the ones in western countries, but I have friends who were hospitalized and they said the service was pretty good.
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>>1070029
you have no idea what you are talking about you fucking arrogant pleb
Working in Esl allows you to live a comfortable middle class life in a cheap country everything is not about money. How could you be more american than that statement
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>>1070029
Focusing specifically on pay, the pay the pay in ESL is often fine if you plan on staying in a country indefinitely, as it is typically high to average for the country you're in, but most ESL teachers have no intention of doing this so all they see is the additional money they could be making in their home country. That Australian guy who will eventually move back to Australia is a perfect example of this.
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>>1066847
Korean and Japanese people can't even tell each other apart. Pretty much any noticeable difference comes down to makeup, hairstyle, and clothing
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>>1069900
>>1069759
Why are you being assholes about it I did not take the offer it's my first time and was asking for advice. But yea I rejected them thanks for confirming it was fucked up pricing.
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>>1069972
The porn industry enough said.
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>>1070106
and some white people can't tell each other apart but I can
>>
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>>1069972
They don't think that for non-Asians. They only think that for white people
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>>1070131
>gooklet detected
you are just autistic.
i can literally tell if someone is dutch, french, english, russian, etc just by looking at them most of the time.
you probably have aspergers.
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>>1070165
in the west its SUPER hard to tell white people apart, as a white person i'm not even joking bro.
>>
It's hard to tell Arabs apart, and East Africans, but that's because they are all inbred cousin fuckers
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>>1070171
it actually isn't you are simply blinded by american memes that make you think Irishmen can look like Sicilians
>>
How difficult would it be to get a job as an English teacher being European (not from UK) with Bachelor of English education and some practice in teaching adults, and kids in foreign country?
>>
>>1070111
Ok, sorry?
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>>1070233
If you're not from an English speaking country and you don't have documentation showing that you went to international schools all your life they don't want you. They're even wary of Jamaicans and South Africans since its not an accent the students will be familiar with.
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>>1070084
Ah ok, thanks for the information so far. So do you have to work full time to get a work visa? See I was thinking of applying in person and then when I get hired getting a work visa. I've heard about all the part time stuff and that's why I'm asking about visa and insurance. I'm used to Korea where you basically get tied to your school.

Can you do private tutoring there too?
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>>1069985
Anyone?
>>
International school teaching is where it is really at. Get the right qualifications and reap the rewards ESL bros.
>50k euro salary
>housing, insurance and flights
>get treated like a professional
>13 weeks holiday a year
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>>1070233
>with Bachelor of English education and some practice in teaching adults

I'f you're fluent You will find work in places like South East Asia. I worked in a school with two Dutch people.
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>>1069744
Naw you're right. I had a long week cause my contract was up and I'm dealing with visa issues. I was getting too butt flustered. Nothing wrong with playing your strengths.

My lineage is filled with english, danish, german and french so I'm sure I'm born from ESL marriages somewhere down the line.

Sorry for offending.
>>
I'm in highschool now but I'm looking to spend my life travelling abroad and seeing the world. Preferably, I'd live extended amounts of time in a variety of countries in different regions in the world. Is ESL/TEFL the way to go for me? What are some pros/cons of the job?
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>>1070550
Hey i won't sugar coat it, Almost every highschooler/person in the world wants that.

Teaching english is not a lucrative or very easy job as it gets tedious and boring quickly and travelling, Even alot, becomes unfun because its for work .

That being said get your grades high as you can, get into a good university known for shitting out teachers and specialize in teaching english and maybe you can land a nice gig in dubai or some rich colored country and teach a rich family's kids english.

Don't like in japan/asia teaching english as it becomes a quick treadmill to nowhere
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>>1070556
I hate dubai/the middle east in general 2bh. I'd prefer teaching in indochina or eastern europe. Is this possible?
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>>1070559
If you need to ask us and haven't done the research yourself then no its not possible.
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>>1070561
I meant "can people still get jobs teaching in those regions or are they too full/low in demand for someone to get them?"
But ok 4chan sage, thank you for your wisdom. I'm so sorry I didn't do enough research beforehand to please you.
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>>1069985
I could really use an opinion here. A minute out of your day.
>>
I'm seeing adverts up around my uni to get a CELTA certification in Rome on a 3 week course for £1300
is it worth it?
>>
Is it worth it to try to get an ESL qualification to teach in thr Philippines and if so, where can I get such a qualification? Everywhere I've read for the Philippines you need a Bachelor's in teaching to teach English.
>>
>>1071234
Everybody in the Phillipines knows English already. You'd probably have to become a legit teacher there and I am not sure what the demand is foreigners
>>
>>1071268
English is the language of the government and your average uneducated Filipino has a rudimentary grasp of basic English, but it is not the language of the home and clearly peoples second language there. But yeah, the thought of needing ESL teachers in the Philippines seems absurd. Filipinos often offer Skype English lessons themselves to Asians.
>>
I have heard that ESL one-on-one tutors are making obscene amounts of money in Seoul.

Can anyone verify?

I'll be heading up to Korea sometime around the Summer anyway, mainly to enjoy the artificiality of the city and to bonk locals. If I can get money, I can surely multiply my excesses.
>>
>>1071496
I have heard that ESL one-on-one tutors are making obscene amounts of money in Seoul

Ehh, probably in some cases, but those are probably mainly lifers or at least people who have been there a couple years who have built up a network and gained private students from a past job or through word of mouth.
>>
>>1071279

not only that, but koreans (at least 10 years ago) came to the philippines to learn english relatively cheaply and then progress to moving to the US.
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>>1070165
same way you could tell chinks from gooks from japs
>>
So I travel internationally quite a lot as I go to countries where my currency takes me a lot further. I speak 2 languages but go to countries where I don't speak their language. It's mostly not an issue but there's some awkward conversations here and there, especially as I'm somewhat autistic at times. (aren't we all)

Anyways, for those who moved to Asia without knowing a lick of the local language, how did you get yourself set up initially? Do the schools do everything for you like help with finding an apartment (for those who didn't have living arrangements in their contracts), paying rent/utilities, setting up a bank account, going shopping, etc? When I travel it's pretty easy as I can book a place to sleep online, all I need to then worry about is where I eat which I can point at dishes or pick random menu options and how to buy a bus/train ticket for the next destination. But with moving somewhere permanently there are a lot of additional every day issues to solve.
>>
Is Seoul the comfiest asian city to teach in? I never really thought about it as an option, but seeing videos makes life in Seoul a bit more relaxed than Japan. Also, much more refined than China. Seems like a good blend for the two, but it also seems like the teaching is taken a little bit more seriously there.
>>
Can someone make a OP worthy post detailing ESL teaching?

What kind of qualifications do you need? What kind of people/students will you most likely be working with? What countries are looking to hire ESL teachers? Etc.
>>
>>1068882
>Even if your not from Canada it's good.
I don't think YOU'RE gonna make it, somehow.
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>>1072755
>but seeing videos makes life in Seoul a bit more relaxed than Japan

In what way?

>>1072897
What kind of qualifications do you need?
Generally just a bachelor's degree.

>What kind of people/students will you most likely be working with?
In Korea, almost exclusively children. In Japan kids and adults are both common.

>What countries are looking to hire ESL teachers?
China, Taiwan, Japan and Korea are the biggest markets. Of those, Korea is definitely the most English crazy.
>>
>>1072897
I have only taught in Taiwan so everything I write about this that isn't about Taiwan is just what I read online. I have researched this field for the last few years to determine the best place for me. For the folks who have taught and have more information please add on to what I write here.

>Qualification
This depends on where you would like to teach. Basically most countries look at 2 things, a degree in any subject from an English speaking country and an English teaching certificate of which the 3 major ones are TEFL/TESL, TESOL and CELTA. So the more developed nations (Japan, Korea, Middle East, Eastern Europe) are looking for people who have both a degree and a teaching certificate, the middle ground (Thailand, China, South America) is looking for at least a degree, while the less developed (Cambodia, Indonesia) are looking for a white face with at least an online teaching certificate. There are some exceptions to these, like you might get a job in China without a degree if you look hard enough but will likely get paid less than people who have a degree.

The degree field does not matter, it can be accounting, phyiscs, or basket weaving as long as it's from Canada, US, UK, Australia and South Africa. In some developing countries you see people from places like Germany, Scandinavia or Netherlands teaching English but they usually are not able to get the best jobs. Actually, in a lot of 2nd/3rd tier cities in China there are a lot of non-native English speakers who teach English.
>>
>>1073007
As for the teaching certificate there are differences.
>TEFL/TESL
These certificates are going to be more entry level, they're cheaper, shorter, and just give a basic guideline of what is required in a job. You can either do them online over around 3 months or in a classroom over the span of a few weeks. They cost anywhere from $100 to $1000. If you are new to the field get these first and teach for a year before going for a TESOL or CELTA.
>TESOL
So while the TEFL/TESL certificates aren't as standardized, this one is but it's pretty much the same as above. Might be slightly more expensive but is usually better formatted to prepare you for the job. Some people say that it's exactly like TEFL/TESL so find a reputable school if you're going for this option.
>CELTA
A standardized certificate that requires people to have a degree. It's around $2000-4000 and is quite in depth. This one is recommended to people who have taught for some time and are looking for more knowledge with the intention of working in the field long time. Some people say this one is never really needed but if you want to make this job a career this is the program to go for after getting some experience. There is a more advanced option called DELTA which is for very experienced teachers and it would allow you to teach English to immigrants in your home country.
>>
>>1073008
>Students
This also really depends on the country. For most of Asia it's mainly children and teenagers. In the Eastern Europe and South America there are actually quite a lot of teaching centers for adults. Teaching kids in most of these countries just means babysitting with games and a few English words snuck in here and there. Teenagers are usually only taught vocabulary by foreigners while a local teacher teaches them grammar in another class. Adults usually require the full spectrum including grammar and vocab. Many people teach in a classroom throughout the week but supplement this income with private tutoring on weekends which can be quite lucrative in some cities (think $40 per hour in Seoul).

>Working conditions
This is something that newcomers need to look at clearly as there are a lot of varied conditions depending on the location, school setup, owners of the company/school they work for, etc.
>Public Schools
Some countries hire for public schools (Japan, Korea) where you teach in a normal elementary or high school along with local teachers who teach math and history. These usually pay quite well although most likely not the most in a given country, they also usually offer accommodation, benefits, insurance, sometimes food (school lunches), access to language classes for the teachers themselves, and a lot of holiday time compared to the alternatives. To teach in public schools you usually have to be hired through a hiring program like JET (Japan) or EPIK (Korea) where you compete with a lot of people before even going to those countries.
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>>1073009
>Private Schools
Eikaiwa in Japan or Hagwon in Korea, these are schools usually have teachers working in the evenings and weekends when the parents take their kids to have extra education. In Asia education is serious business. Depending on some factors private schools can actually pay more than public and also offer quite a few benefits but they usually have some down sides when it comes to working hours. Teachers might not always get a full time job even though they were hired for one if the school says they don't have enough students. The working times might vary so one day you're teaching from noon and another you're teaching late evenings and often times there's weekend work as well. These schools also have more of a chance of fucking a teacher over especially in a country like China where it's known for them to fire teachers a month before their contract is completed so they don't have to pay bonuses.
>Adult Teaching Centers
In some countries those are really popular with professionals. These usually operate in the evenings and the lessons are more in depth. I really don't have much info on these.
>Tutoring
Can be a great way to supplement an income. Tutoring doesn't provide a visa for a country so in most cases you can only do this as a side job. In some places the pay is high and it's not taxed as it's cash to hand so it's easy to make a lot of money from this. In fact, some teachers after building up a reputation and getting more and more clients decide to teach in a school only part time because they make more doing this. The teaching schedule is usually shit though, evenings and weekends. Students can also say they don't have time in a given day and the teacher won't make any money that day.
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>>1073010
>International Schools
These are usually for expats kids and wealthy locals. They usually teach the whole curriculum in a certain western language (usually English but there are German schools like this as well and I'm sure others) where they hire teachers certified to teach in a western country. To get into these you have to go through the process of becoming a teacher in your own country which usually means English degree + teaching diploma. These pay a lot better than the above options.
>University
I left this for last because for the most part you need either a masters degree or an English degree + a teaching diploma and qualifications from your home country to teach in universities. If you really like the field you might consider this option as it's often better paying than the other options.

>Wages Per Month
Middle east: $2000-4000
Japan: $2500-3000
Korea: $2000-2500
Taiwan: $2000
China: $1500
SEA: $800-1500
South America: $800-1500
Eastern Europe: $700-1300
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>>1073011
>Teaching Information
When you finish a teaching certificate program you usually get access to teaching resources for a certain period. Things like lesson plans, games, instructions, and so on. In some schools, lesson schedule is given to you and you have to follow it exactly as they say. Sometimes you might get some ability to make changes where you have to plan your own lessons but still have to follow a plan. In some cases you have to plan everything where they just give you a classroom and tell you teach them something. There are also blogs, websites, and other online resources (youtube...) you can access that have pre-made lesson plans. There are also website that you might pay a subscription fee for to access a lot of specialized lesson plans. When you start off it's a lot of work and it might take many unpaid hours to prep for the few hours you will teach. Eventually after a few months it gets easier and you can set up a plan for an entire day in 30-60 minutes.
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>>1073013
>Best Places To Work
This really depends on you and your qualifications and what you want out of this job. Some people enjoy warmer climates and don't care that they're getting paid less in Thailand or Indonesia because they love it there so much. It's always warm, the food is amazing, the people are nice, they're happy with life there. Others who are only looking at the money and don't care about the shitty life conditions in the Middle East go there as they are able to save a lot there. The best balance from what I read is found in Taiwan, Korea and Japan. All 3 countries are fun, the wages are quite high, there's a possibility to save money to travel during your breaks, and they offer a variety of living and teaching conditions. China is an interesting alternative as some folks prefer the wild life there. It's possible to earn a lot of money doing this but there's also the possibility of being fucked over. You will get differing opinions on this. Some people who got screwed over by a school in Korea will say it's shit there, others will say that Korea is much better than Japan because they managed to find a job that pays them $50 more per month in Korea... Taiwan is a good option because the $2000 per month average you can earn there will allow you to save up to $1000 a month while living a decent life. The average wage in Taiwan is under $1000 a month so you'll be making a lot more than the locals. The weather is not as bad as people say it is, the food is really good, the girls are cute and not as crude as mainland Chinese, people are very friendly, Taipei is a metropolis where you can find everything from ancient Chinese herb mixes to tacos.
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>>1073015
>Criticism
If you're on 4chan long enough you'll read more than a fair share of people saying this profession is shit and not worth your time. Look, this is not a job that will make you wealthy, but then again most aren't. I worked in an office doing typical office drone tasks for years and I was miserable even though I was getting paid quite well. Teaching can be an interesting experience. You get to experience another culture, meet a lot of people, travel, eat amazing food, do cool things you wouldn't do back home, and for many people like myself break out of your shell. If you have a degree in a STEM field and you have the ability to find a well paying job then maybe consider teaching for only a year or two if you're really interested in this and then go back home to look for a career job. If you think you want to dedicate your life to teaching think about teaching for a few years and then going for a masters degree and further to teach in universities where you can get paid a hell of a lot more. Personally I wouldn't want to do this for a long time as I'm not into teaching and mainly used this to fund my time in another country. But I have no issue with people who do stay for their whole lives.
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It looks like shit is about to hit the fan. I'm teaching in China, and the RMB is facing devaluation by 2% each month, and it's only going to get worse. The free ride is over, China is done for.

I'm thinking of bailing to Vietnam. Smart move?
>>
Non-native speaker here. I did my entire Bsc in English, will that help me land a teacher's job in Nihon?

I would try to find work somewhere else, but my Japanese probably isn't good enough yet. Also, it would have to be Tokyo, I'm afraid that is the whole point.

Am I screwed?
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>>1073032
what about taiwan?
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What is the best Spanish speaking country to teach in
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>>1068000
>>1068387

I'm 32, i also have a good career and mortgage but i want to take a break for a while and am considering teaching english as a means of living abroad.
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I'll make this question short and sweet.

I'm gonna graduate in April 2017, and I have $70,000 CAD in debt. I have a Bachelor of Education and BA with high honours level marks, I did a lot of work with kids, especially kids with cancer, I'm fluent in French and Japanese, I've tutored in my spare time, and I've actually been in a class teaching for about 20 weeks as a result of my practicum.

What is the best company/position for me next year? I want to pay off this massive fucking tumour of debt but im also mildly lazy and would prefer not to work my ass off for my first time doing TEFL
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>>1074231
Korea is the best bachelor level teaching country for purely financial reasons.

I saved 15grand this year after the bonus and collected my pension.
Go public school or find a good hagwon.
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>>1073017
Should probably turn all that shit into a pastebin.

I can vouch for a lot of what this guy says. I work at an excellent hagwon woth a great boss but some of my friends have a shitty life in korea because of their work.

I definitely broke out of my shell from traveling, lost my virginity and got my first girlfriend.
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>>1073032
Taiwan is a perfect version of China. Go to Taiwan
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>>1074231
>>1074231
>fluent in Japanese

Haha no you're not, dude. Just... why lie or exaggerate? You don't gain anything in this situation for doing so.

At any rate, to answer your question, you should get your mildly lazy ass to look in to the JET Programme (public schools in Japan) or else the EPIK/GEPIK program (public schools in Korea). Those are without a doubt the best starter ESL jobs there are, period. Easy, good hours, generous vacation. (like 21 days), good salary for what it is. (And with EPIK you get a free apartment).

GEPIK/EPIK was greatly scaled back a couple years ago. It's limited to just elementary school jobs now. That means it's more competitive than ever, but if you're not picky about location you should probably find something.

would ignore the advice about a "good" hagwon. Some are definitely better than others, at some you don't even have to work Saturday, but you still work nights and the vacation situation is just atrocious at all those places. "Good hagwon" can be your fallback if JET or EPIK don't work out. There are some that aren't bad all things considered.

JET is obviously competitive given all the weebs like yourself, but actually, JET is expanding their number of urban places as English education is going to begin starting earlier in Japan in the coming couple years. Most positions are more rural, but again, being picky about your location shouldn't be on the table. Especially because of your pragmatic reasons for doing ESL. Clearly I'd make this your first choice. As you have studied Japanese you might as well try for Japan.

$70,000CAD is a pretty toxic level of debt. For EPIK and JET, saving over 10kUSD is possible (Don't expect the 15grand like the other guy said unless you are a complete shut-in miser. But hey if you get a rural post--you just might be). Do it for 2-3 years and your debt has been knocked down to a decently manageable level.
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This is the exact thread I was looking for. I'm looking to teach english in either South Korea or Thailand. Ive got a 2 year community college diploma, a bachelors in Business Administrations and ill be finishing my MBA this April. The debt I have is deep but manageable as I have worked while in school (I'm 25k CAD in the hole).

I'm looking to teach english for the experience, NOT for any financial reason. The last 6 years of my life have been one big grind and its time to offload and enjoy myself (I enjoy teaching as well as travelling and partying). Where should I look and where should I start?
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>>1074281
Unfortunately, Korea is out without a 4 year degree. But maybe Thailand is not. I have no experience with Thailand so hopefully someone else will chime in.
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>>1074283
I have my 4 year degree and Im finishing my masters as well. In canada it was cheaper going to a community college and transferring credits to university.
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>>1074281
Wow, I'm sorry I'm blind. You have BA and will have an MBA haha. Please see the above post about GEPIK/EPIK.

BUT for you that should be a fall back. As you will have a postgraduate degree you may be able to get a university job. These can be very very nice. Good luck.
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>>1074280

My mom's Japanese, otherwise I wouldnt even dare putting fluent in Japanese without sounding like an edgelord
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>>1074281
Is there a reason you want to teach English after getting your MBA? Which university are you in? I'm kinda looking at MBAs myself right now and I'm in Canada too.

With an MBA you might be able to get other jobs in the countries you want to travel to, with better wages and conditions than teaching. Unless you specifically want to teach.
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>>1074231
If you don't mind me asking anon, how did you end up 70,000$ in debt? university is at most 8k$ a year here in Canada
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>>1066828
Here's a question that's a little different flavor than some of the others itt.

What EFL communities are best for English teachers who are not interested in dating the locals but are rather interested in dating fellow native English-speaking expats?

In my experience, having taught for a period in Harbin, Beijing, and Chengdu, my sense was that the men either had an interest in dating Chinese girls at the onset or such an interest quickly developed after their arrival.

The women, on the other hand, generally seemed to have less of an interest in remaining for an extended period of time, the higher quality generally being either students or persons there for short-term business purposes. While Beijing was slightly better in this respect (with a larger pool of expatriate women, coming from a more diverse background), it was by no means ideal dating community.

My preference would be to date an American, Brit, South African, or Australian girl. I think it would be comfy as shit to find a girl who shares a similar background to me with whom I could settle down in a non-primate (capitol, major metro, etc.) city on the far side of wherever.

Any travelers have insight where they could shed light on this question?
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>>1066828
i am extremely interested in teaching abroad in korea.
I'm a 23y/o M from US but I didnt finish college(quit half way). Do i absolutely need a degree to teach in korea? Can i just teach privately somehow or use a fake degree if needed?
Any info relevant to korea would be nice.
I dont want to go to china or SEA...
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who here teaches in china?

advice please.
I'm Chinese Canadian, and im fluent in english with high proficiency in mandarin. I have a fiance in China living in Shaanxi province, and I really want to go work in china so i can be with her all the time.

problem is, i dont have a degree. i have a diploma in nursing.

what are my options? aside from the obvious 4 year of school?
also is it technically illegal to teach english without a degree in china? i dont want to risk getting in trouble and being banned from entering china since that would really be problematic for me and her.
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>>1074514
I can't fathom going all the way to China or Korea and not wanting the local flavor. It's like, stay home dude. But hey, you want what you want. It should be pretty easy for you to find a western girl. Most of them are not very interested in dating Asian guys (although I think this is changing somewhat and it's becoming more of a thing). But for the most part, white girls in Asia are craving the western dick. Their frustration is compounded by the fact that all the western guys love Asian girls and are dating them. Good opportunity for you to swoop in.

The problem is going to be the quality, as you've alluded to. Female ESL teachers tend not to be less than hot. They're like the guys who do it, geeky and goofy looking.

Protip: Don't date (white) South African girls. I met 4 of them during my ESL time in Korea and 3/4 all had the same haughty, posh, stuck-up personality. The one who didn't was South African-American. South African guys are bro tier though.

>>1074516
>Do i absolutely need a degree to teach in korea?

Yes, you absolutely, really, truly do.

>Can i just teach privately somehow or use a fake degree if needed?

In Korea? Nope. They will ask for notarized copies of things and a sealed transcript. It baffles me how much this shit is asked over and over again in these threads. And in this thread specifically, the bachelor's qualification for Korea was already brought up and you still asked.

For Japan and Korea *you need a bachelor's degree* Period. Full stop. End of story.
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>>1074558
ok, sorry to not have checked first. thanks for the answer. i was leaning towards finishing school, but now i certainly will.
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>>1074280
>would ignore the advice about a "good" hagwon.

Why so closed minded about this? Did you get fucked over by a hagwon or something?

I purposefully chose a hagwon because i wanted an afternoon work schedule and smaller classes.

You have 5-12 students max, no preparation time needed for lessons, 3pm-10pm work time. I heard others are12-8pm. Literally all of the benefits as public school jobs(housing, plane ticket, pension, health insurance) except 2 weeks vacation difference.
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>>1074589
>"I-it's better guys I swear..."

>Did you get fucked over by a hagwon or something?

No I worked in public schools and know that no hagwon can touch it and you're lying to yourself if you think any hagwon is better.

>except 2 weeks vacation difference.
Except 2 weeks is HUGE in an of itself, it's double the paid vacation. But it's really more than even that when you add into the mix the literal 2.5 months total out of the year where you are basically doing jack shit. You have to be at the school, but you spend the time in the teachers office sitting on your hands watching King of the Hill. For weeks. I know I sure did.

>You have 5-12 students max, no preparation time needed for lessons
Those are indeed benefits but you almost certainly have more than like 4 classes a day, which is what you're looking at with public school.

>3pm-10pm work time
Matter of opinion so I can't argue, but I can't see why anyone would prefer working until 10 to working until 4-4:30. Who doesn't want their evenings to themselves to unwind. Again, I won't argue, this is purely opinion. I don't get it, but I guess some people really, really don't like getting up early. I personally would prefer to just get my work out of the way rather than have it hanging over me.

Small classes and no prep time are valid positives of a hagwon over public, but not significant enough to make it better. The vacation/down time situation is not even close. Public school people have fewer classes a day and waaay more paid vacation and down time.
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>>1074557
I taught full time elementary school ESL in Guangzhou on a student visa with just my ontario high school diploma when I was fresh out of high school.
If I can do you sure can.
>>
>22yo
>Scandinavian
>speaks English fluently from going to an international school adn working in a hotel for 3 years
>soft spoken and pleasant from hotel job
>6'2
>have an IGCSE
>know a bit of Mandarin from hotel job

I want to up and leave to somewhere else, preferably in Asia. Where could I travel with $2000 on hand, and most likely land a job as an English teacher/hotel receptionist? Either officially or under the table.
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>>1074606
I never said it was better.

It's an alternative to public school. The job isn't shit if you find a non-shit school.

I respect your opinion. But you shouldn't gut hagwons because it doesn't suite your personal prefence when other people are looking at this thread for guidance. A lot of it comes down to subjective points.

I prefer small classes, night schedule, no prep and not sitting on my ass at work.

You prefer prep, morning hours,big classes, and sitting on your ass watching king of the hill at work.

Nothing wrong with either.

Sure I'd like more vacation but not at the cost of losing other stuff with higher priority.

Also other jobs in my city seemed to be 2.1mil but mine was 2.4mil so money was a bonus for my hagwon too.
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>>1074628
wow. are you white though?
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>>1074732
>you prefer prep, morning hours, big classes

Except I didn't say that. You're being snarky.
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>>1074734
Yeah
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>>1074752
i think thats an advantage. im chinese
>>
I'm interested in teaching English overseas, but I have a few questions:

I hear a lot of good things about teaching English in Asian countries, but how are European countries? Other countries around the world? Any places I should avoid? (single white female, btw).

Do most companies provide housing for teachers? If not, how do you find housing in a foreign country where you'll be living/working for some time?

I like the idea of teaching in one country for a few years then moving to another country and so on and so forth for as long as I can. Is this a feasible plan?
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>>1074764
Coworker of mine taught in I believe Cezch, she now teaches high school ESL here in the states. I know she has nothing but positive things to say, but I never asked her about pay etc. I will see if I can find her tomorrow, teacher work day, no kids. But it's a big school and she is in a diff department. I have heard Goergia is beautiful and great to work in, but low pay, kinda like a European version of Thailand. (low pay, low cost of living, good life, but not big savings like Korea). My South African friend is teaching in Istanbul after teaching with me in Thailand and she loves it. She is a certified teacher though. Pretty much all my white female friends who teach have teaching degrees and work in international schools, the ones who don't worked in S.K or Thailand which you can read about above.
>>
Looking to book an online 120 hour TEFL course, any recommendations?
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>>1074281
Do you know if South Korea will accept a three year diploma from Canada?
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>>1074241
Can you teach in South Korea with a three year diploma?
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>>1074860
There's like literally no reason to do this. Korean public schools require a 100 hour. For most anything else it's pretty worthless.
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>>1074918
No. Need a 4 year degree.
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Anyone with RUSSIA experience? Going there 100%in 2017 and I want to be prepared.
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>>1074941
I'm looking to spain, but I won't have time between handing in my bachelor thesis, moving home and country to squeeze in a four week course.

will doing it online be a major disadvantage?
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>>1074966
Not that guy.
But what if you are a European? Our bachelors degree are three years as standard, and if we study in the US we are generally exempt from the first year if you do well in high school.
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>>1066828
Pleb here,
Doing a cert, through a university.

What is your opinion or/and experience of the following:

>International schools, good pay but sporadic hours?
>Private Schools, as above except you might get shafted financially as well...
>Public Governmental Schools, good hours and holidays but less pay?
>NGO's, worst pay but alright hours and feels?
>Why not Mongolia, or Poland? Uncomfortable to live there and nothing to do?
>Is there any point teaching in Europe, US, or Canada? Expensive, most already know some English, etc.
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>>1074860
I'd advise against it. I know some schools in Japan/Korea don't give much value to online TEFL courses. They prefer it if you take the actual, in-class course, even if it's less hours than the online
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>>1074916
see
>>1069216

If your diploma is anything other than a university degree, the answer to your question will be no
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>>1074918
>>1075145
>>
>>1074966
not necessarily. Universities in quebec are 3 year programs, which are accepted by korean and japanese schools. as long as you completed an undergrad, that's all that matters
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>>1075148
I've finished a diploma at a College (cegep). It's a Civil Engineering Technology diploma.
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>>1075047
Just speaking as an American. Sorry. I'm not familiar with euro degrees.

Most korean jobs prefer Americans due to the accent anyways. It didn't stop my Irish coworker from getting the job but he tried his best American accent for the job interview hahaha.
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>>1075322

What is with Irish potato fart-sniffers stealing native English speakers' jobs in Asia? I recently got fired from my language mill center because they replaced with me some good looking Irish cabbage-farting potato nigger. Is the economy that bad in Ireland?

I don't think they should be qualified as native English speakers.
>>
Anybody have experience with moonlighting teaching kids?
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>>1066828
How exactly does one get started / work towards becoming an English Language teacher? Do you have to know Korean or the language of the country you are teaching in?

What are the best programs / certificates to get?
>>
>>1075330

fartttttt splurch
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>>1074455

I lived in an expensive as fuck residence and tuition is the highest in the country where I live.
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>>1074732
>no prep

Are you a wizard? How do you teach with no prep? I need to spend at least 90 mins planning for a 90 min lesson.
>>
Is there a way to teach English abroad if English isn't your mother tongue? I'm German and very interested in teaching in SEA for a year or more.
>>
>>1075414
2hy not teach German?
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>>1075418
Because I think that German is much harder to learn for Asian children. Also I don't think that there's such a high demand for German, because it's not as useful as English...
>>
>>1075414
>>1075421
South Korea loves Germany because of the missionaries, so German is as much a part of their language studies as English.

Check it out.
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>>1075424
Well, that are great news! Thank you guys. I'd love to get away from my home country for a while, therefore that would be awesome
>>
so here i am in china teaching english to kids 7-12.

my class has 10 kids aged 7-12. every class, at some point, devolves into the children swarming me for help (usually the girls who are very industrious and take their work seriously). i try to maintain order as best i can, but it's pretty chaotic, i have to shout several times and show an angry face to make them quiet. this is also my first time teaching a class.

i think that my class is too varied, the kids' english levels and maturity levels are all over the place. not much i can do, but i have to come up with three separate levels of work for them to suit their english level.

i need some outside perspective on this.
also, the thought occurs to me that i 've been given a really hard class from the start. at first i thought this is kind of normal for inexperienced teachers, but i don't really have any perspective.
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>>1075669
You are teaching at a language mill?
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>teaching children or teens
>>
I taught ESL at a prestigious private elementary school in Seoul for 6 months. 2.4mil/mo, paid airfare/apartment, and two months paid vacation every year (yep). How did I end up with such a kickass first gig? Easy, I went on vacation to Korea to visit a friend and ended up banging a Canadian chick who worked at the school. She hooked me up with the job, easy as that.

Unfortunately I hated teaching so I quit after six months. No matter how sweet the deal is, at the end of the day if you don't enjoy herding cats teaching is just pure frustration. I really did like a lot of the kids and honestly miss some of them, I'm much happier working in a career I can advance in at home and just vacationing in other countries instead of working in them. My advice would be to really ask yourself if you enjoy teaching, or just want to travel.
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>>1075379
My school is a self study hagwon with all the books and mp3s provided. Each student progresses at their own pace.

With 5 to 10 students per class they usually get around 5~7 minute interviews each day about the material they studied.

Only prep is maybe printing out a worksheet from a massive binder of material already there.

I show up around 2:25 and leave at 10pm each day.
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>>1075690
Doesn't sound like teaching to me senpai. Seems like a nice gig tho
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>>1075670

no, it's a private tutor center for elementary to middle school children that primarily focuses on English. the principle teaches a chinese culture class there, at least for this winter break period.
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>>1075674
This. I teach university age adults. Most are early to mid-20s, but can be anywhere from 18-19 (might be one or two in a class) all the way up to 40s-50s or so for some PhD students. I have one mature student just taking courses as a hobby who is in her mid-70s. It's a sweet gig.

>>1075686
>teaching
It's as you said: herding cats. Being a clown, keeping them busy/entertained while you do repetitive low-value drilling of little gook kids is not really teaching, bro...
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>>1075686
This is the hard lesson on why most ESL people don't do it long term/indefinitely
>>
I just made a thread about this on the international board so I'll just repost it here. I apologize in advance if any of this has already been answered but I have to go do shit right now and can't read the whole thread at the moment.

I'm thinking about moving to South Korea for about 6 months (maybe more) to teach. I don't really know much about South Korea though. Specifically, it's looking like I'll live in Seoul and work on Jeju island.

A big question I have is, I only speak English, how big of a problem is that going to be?

Other than that, I'm just wondering about the general quality of life there, how safe it is, exactly how corrupt is their government (I've heard stories of them going into foreigners houses when they're gone and searching the place and setting up cameras and stuff), and just any information you guys can give me about the place.

Also, if anyone's heard of it, I'd be working for the Jeju TaLK program. I have a cousin who says she knows people that did it and they liked it, but I want more than one second-hand opinion

Also, I'm a math education major. Would I be able to teach math or is this kind of stuff just for English? And do they give you lesson plans to teach or would I have to make my own? (I'm fine with making my own but I'm not sure if how I'm expected to write one in America is different than how I'd be expected to write one in Korea, if that makes sense)
>>
>>1075729
Yep, I don't have time to babysit other people's brats. I worked for IH last year and only accepted adult classes with the odd teen class. Adults really showed their appreciation and always tried to one up each other when it came to treating me out.
>>
i'm in one of the major main cities in china and i keep getting fired from my teaching jobs since i had no experience when i came here. just recently i had a relatively easy job making $2600 a month teaching kids, but i just got fired again (i hate kids but i was willing to do the bitch work for that money). anyway, they keep firing me because of all the goddamn foreigners here they can replace you with if you don't work out or if you're not outgoing enough and don't have experience.

so i'm thinking of moving to a smaller city in the countryside with hardly any foreigners and work there for a year just to gain experience, and so they won't be able to fire me so easily. i could also probably teach at a high school or university easier out there.

the idea of making only roughly $1500-$2000 a month out there doesn't appeal to me though. what would anyone else do in my situation?
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>>1075775
My advice is to stop sucking at your job. ESL teaching only requires chimp level brain power.
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>>1066828
What credentials do you need to work in Korea? Like, do I need a degree?
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>>1075742
Gooks don't expect you to speak Korean.

I think you might be confusing Best Korea with Worst Korea. Worst Korea isn't going to be installing bugs in your room while you're gone, bro. It's not 1976 or some shit.

> I'll live in Seoul and work on Jeju island.
Yeh, have fun with that as a daily commute bro...

No, you won't be able to teach math to the little gooklets. They don't want your math knowledge, they want your sweet American English-speaking tongue caressing their children's ears. The approach to education isn't at all modern by top western standards.

No one is going to check your personal notes or lesson plans if that's what you mean. If you want to be super lazy, and are willing and able to wing it, you could probably manage with never doing it. I don't make lesson plans for every lesson nowadays... partly because I have enough of an 'archive' I can pull out when necessary, and partly because I've been doing it so long it's second nature.
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>>1075786
Yes, you need a degree.

Maybe you can fake your way for some shitty language school in Cambodia, or even China, where you can work under the table and the owners will 'forget' to pay you sometimes. But there's no way you're working in Korea without credentials.
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>>1075783

Yeah, it's easy, but if you aren't extremely outgoing like barney the purple dinosaur on crack they'll 86 your ass. At least in this country. It has nothing to do with how good of a teacher you are.
>>
>>1075790
Is there anything you can acquire, certification or something, that will allow you to work in Korea without a degree?
>>
>>1075783
And that's already more than 80% of all other jobs on the planet.
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>>1075797
A bachelor degree.
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>>1075686
>>1075731
Actually there are some of those guys in Japan and Korea. It's quite amusing to talk to them. They've been there for a while maybe 8 or 9 years. They did all the touristy stuff and all the "cool Japan" things. They didn't put the effort to learn the language. They have no local friends and only hang around the Foreigner friendly bars. Constantly bitches and moans about the locals and the country. They're all like 40 years old and still "teach" 4 to 10 year olds "English". And they know nobody respects them and they know their job is meaningless. They hate all the new foreigners coming and being wide-eyed about the country. They even sometimes hate other foreigners because now the only thing they had (working in an exotic place) has become a non-exotic thing and many people are doing it. Most of them are single or if they were married probably divorced or can barely support their family with an English teachers wage and you can't support a family with that wage. They really are toxic people. Bitching and moaning gets boring fast. Sometimes I get it but after a while it's just retarded. A lot of these people were or are a nobody in their country. Not sure if that really means or adds anything.

If I missed anything tell me.

>It should have been green text oh well
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>>1075326
What's your girlfriend's opinion on how he uses his tongue?
>>
Would it be possible to build up a tutoring clientèle by using office lady girlfriends for word of mouth advertising?
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>>1075827
That works, teacher aides as well. But be wary a lot of native teachers tutor and some might play bullshit games. One of their favorite is to start failing the students you tutor, contact mom, transfer them to their tutoring and start giving them the test ahead of time or just higher grades. If you offer payment for their headhunting, you will get a lot more referrals.
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>>1075704
It's a nice gig. But it is teaching and they're improving their English. Why would you think otherwise?
>>
Filipino here. How much discrimination would I face teaching at Japan/korea? My brother told me I'd be thought of as a second class citizen. It sounds true but I wanna hear some opinions. I have a bachelor's degree and experience working as a teacher assistant for normal children and special needs children. Does that count for anything
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>>1076060
I'm also coming from the U.S.
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>>1076060
I know you are looking at Japan and Korea but they are actively looking for FIlipino teachers in Thailand and the Middle East
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>>1076064
Why are they looking for Filipinos? And I was actually thinking about Thailand as well. Maybe Taiwan
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>>1076066
The Middle East, the countries withhuge expat populations like Bahrain, UAE, Kuwait, and Qatar, have a lot of FIlipinos. Filipino teachers for Filipino and international schools. I'll post some links from ajarn.com for Thailand soon. And some links from Bahrain, since that's where my knowledge is most intimate as far as the Middle East, later.
>>
>>1076066
>>1076068
http://www.ajarn.com/recruitment/browse_jobs/Thailand/115443.html
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>>1076066
Be ready to be paid less than your white coworkers. I got paid more When I had a 4 year psych degree vs my Filipino coworkers with teaching degrees and experience. Its more money than the Philippines, but you will never be equal.
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>>1076073
does it matter that I've been living in the US since 1999?

>>1076068
Thanks for the links. Maybe it wouldn't be the worse thing to live in the middle east.
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>>1076077
No, only the fact that your skin is dark. You'll still make more money than a Thai teacher. If you have a US teaching degree, there are some international schools that don't adhere to the racist guide lines that white skin means a better teacher.
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>>1076077
If you have a US passport it might be just easier to call yourself an American.
If you're dark, you may want to prep it up a bit. Pink oxford shirts and whatnot.
>>
How do you guys design your curriculum? Is there a premade one that you use or do you have to make one from scratch?
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>>1076525
It depends greatly on the job. For starter jobs, hagwons in Korea and the eikaiwa school companies in Japan will all have books and material that you will follow. Public school NET/ALT jobs vary by school. Some you're on your own making the class, other you'll just use the book. When I was at a public school in Korea, I did both depending on the co-teacher and class.

If you're on your own, just remember that for ALT/NET jobs, the focus is on fun. You're not a real teacher and you're not expected to be pedagogical and teach grammar and shit. Make it about games, make it about music, etc.

One thing my kids really liked is when I taught them the English in K-pop songs. You know how K-pop songs will always have random English thrown in there, we'd just go over that- (with corrections if necessary).
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>>1076525
My school gives me a list of grammar points, speaking skills and vocabulary they need to know at the end of the course. I'm free to use whatever book I want or no book at all if I feel like making up my own lesson.
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>>1076565
And by they I mean the students.

>implying I can actually English
>>
are there any rules about not fucking your students?
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>>1076575
It depends on the job. At my last eikaiwa school the rule was that you could not see anyone under 20 years old outside of the classroom one on one.

I wasn't gonna be that guy, but it's something that a lot ESLers want.
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>>1076525
>How do you guys design your curriculum? Is there a premade one that you use or do you have to make one from scratch?

I use their material as a framework (legal guidelines, school culture, projected academic outcome), then I create as I see fit based on a students needs.

>mfw
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>>1075206
They won't accept that
>>
>kid is calling other students retarded (in chinese)
>tell him to stop it
>he says no
>tell him to stand up
>he refuses
>have to carry him kicking and screaming out of the classroom
>tell him to sit on a bench outside
>he move the second i turn my back
>waste 2 minutes staring him down
>kids in my class getting more wild
>go back to classroom, he follows me
>tell him he can come back, but he loses his break time
>break time comes, i make him sit in a chair and not move or talk or look at other students
>tell him he doesnt get any tokens today (school issues tokens that students can exchange for toys)
>slightly more cooperative

besides this, i don't know any other punitive measures i can take. i want to talk with his parents but they don't come until much later to pick him up.

at least tomorrow is the last day for the winter session. how the hell do you guys discipline your students?
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>>1076872
Come on, man. Let him call the other students retarded if he refuses to stop. Don't make a fool of yourself, and waste the class's time, by making a huge deal out of it. Don't touch the students. Jesus. Never touch a student. That kid could have you fired or at least fined by your school. Isolate him from the others. The class will learn to ignore him. You will ignore him. If the other kids complain to their parents about him, that bully will be removed from the class. Give crippling punishments. Not "no tokens for today," but for the entire week (even if you only meet with him once a week) with the possibility, if he behaves every day, to get a token later in that week. I teach at a public school, and when one student took two consecutive flash photos of me, I picked up his books, walked to the door, and threw them outside. Maybe you can try that. Worked for me.

And keep in mind, some students just don't give a fuck, and YOU can do nothing.
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>>1076886

>don't touch the students

lel

I dont know what country you're in but in China, I was told to yell at students if they get out of line, give them high fives when they're good and let them hug me and such if they wanted. Of course I refrained from that creepy stuff except for giving them high 5s, but other foreign teachers would play with the kids, tickle them, and do other pedo-like stuff. Our female Chinese TAs would slap the kids on their asses.

Anyway, to that other guy, your native TAs are supposed to discipline the fart-sniffing brats. If you don't have a TA, then you probably need to be more stern with them cuz it sounds like they don't respect you at all. Just don't get fired, because you never know what these slants will complain about and get you fired for next. It's a thin line.
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Guys, I really need some advice.

first, background:

>have degree in biochem, three months exp teaching english in UK.
>offered job to teach in kuwait for the air force
>$2000, accomodation, travel, health covered.
>teaching English to military air force.
>contract arrived last week - no holidays apart from national holidays
>decide to check company online, bad rep, people slating it.
>decide to go for it anyway as I have hardly any experience and need to start somewhere.
>job requires me to go to texas for two weeks for language training at a US base
>air tickets arrive two days ago
>receive email today, they now want a police background check and this must be apostilied.
>want by the 27th of feb, before I fly out to kuwait.
>background check will take a few weeks, apostilie will also take a few weeks as I will be in the US from the 14th.
>getting increasingly dubious about the company and its bad handling of things, leaving things too late.
>spoke to a teacher who worked for the company before, told me how it has a bad rep amongst the tefl industry and people usually leave after the first year because of it. Also teaching to arab military students is not worth it.

I've already signed the contract, air tickets have arrived. Can I still back out? I have this gut feeling that I should not be going ahead with it.
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>>1076957
If you signed the contract but don't have your background check yet, are you able to stall it so they don't receive it in time for when you were supposed to start teaching?
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>>1076957
If it sounds dubious, it's because it probably is
>>
Does anyone here know if you need a degree to teach English in Vietnam? I keep reading conflicting information about this subject.
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>>1076957
>teaching to arab military students
Fuck that m8.
Every Arab student I've had has been a cunt.
Iranians? Diligent but "we wuz Persians n shit". Pakistani? Duplicit but industrious. Afghan? Surprisingly chill but can be a bit Alloo akbar . Morrocan? Would cut your throat for a few pounds but the best hosts out of the bunch (once they know you don't have money). Turks are basically brown westerners.
But Arabs?
Not even once.

>they all have the thousand yard rape-stare, but Arabs are the only once that would act upon it.
>>
Is it all possible to get a job teaching English if you only have an associate's of science in business and also the TEFL cert?
>>
Yo has anyone got any experience teaching in Russia or Ukraine?
How does it differ from Asia?
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>>1077125
When I lived in Bahrain with the US military there were plenty of Paki rapists. Especially the cops, who were mostly Paki. Not to mention the Indians and other South Asians. Arabs were actually the least likely of the groups to actually rape. Though it was really only South East Asians that got raped.
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>>1077133
Not in South Korea or Japan, but maybe elsewhere.
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Teaching in Japan to elementary school kids. Their is one sixth year student (12 years old) who recently started to play footsies with me whenever we eat lunch in the classroom as well as hold me, hug me, and generally be touchy with me in and out of class.

At first this was cute and i play it cool and not pay attention to it. But, it's getting to be too much and I'd feel hella stupid to make it an issue by saying "No touching!" as Japanese kids generally don't see touching as taboo.

P.S she aint touchy around anywhere naughty, but generally my arms, belly, legs, hands, face, all that.

I feel dumb for thinking its an issue, but as stupid as this sounds i don't want her to hate me if i tell her I don't like her "touching me so much."

I'm still not sure how to approach it. OR just not approach it at all.
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>>1076967

Yeah I can do that, as an excuse that I don't want to go ahead with the job. However, part of the role requires me to go to the DLI centre in san antonio for the first two weeks for language training.

I just did some calculations, the pay is £1380 a month. I get more then that and save more living in the UK then I would in kuwait, wtf! I really have some doubts about this job. But i don't know if I should leave it as getting the job took some effort and time, what if I don't find anything else?
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>>1077186
If you already have experience you can easily find a job in East Asia. If you're specifically looking at high pay then I really don' know but the jobs in Korea or Taiwan pay quite well for the cost of living there.
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>>1077167
>Teaching in Japan to elementary school kids. Their is one sixth year student (12 years old) who recently started to play footsies with me whenever we eat lunch in the classroom as well as hold me, hug me, and generally be touchy with me in and out of class.
>At first this was cute and i play it cool and not pay attention to it. But, it's getting to be too much and I'd feel hella stupid to make it an issue by saying "No touching!" as Japanese kids generally don't see touching as taboo.
>P.S she aint touchy around anywhere naughty, but generally my arms, belly, legs, hands, face, all that.
>I feel dumb for thinking its an issue, but as stupid as this sounds i don't want her to hate me if i tell her I don't like her "touching me so much."
>I'm still not sure how to approach it. OR just not approach it at all.
Basic Teacher Behavior 101.
You have to discourage it how you think is best, whether you implement a total class rule that doesn't single this student out, or you just use body language with the one child as you change up the manner of it all. Or a private talk with mom/dad or the student. You may not fear an accusation of inappropriate touching if the culture is different; still need to remind a needy student of what is appropriate to teachers. Experienced elem teachers will tell you, the world over, students are molested at home or by someone they know more than you think. To act out for validation with intimacy for acceptance to other adults. Sick, but true. In any given classroom at any socio-economic you might have 1-2 at any given time that have some horror w/to them in this category. You don't know. Tread carefully, and really when I see needy kids and I don't know the actual situation (like maybe a recent death of a parent), see neediness as alarm bells.

Teachers in the US will make a "quick shoulder hugs" as the rule, and a timed maximum 2 second rule. Or just hands. Maybe teach soft business skills of shaking hands greeting to all.
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>>1077167

Watch the film "The Hunt". You will never touch a kid again.
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>>1077211
>>1077167
Isn't this this just cultural differences?
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>>1077211
This is just an educated guess but I would assume that in a place like Japan where it's known that people work the whole day a child might become close to a teacher because they just don't see their parent(s) all that much. I could also see pushing the child away as another rejection from an adult.

I think you might be close in that the student lost a parent because that parent might only be in their life 2 days a week or less. A 12 year old might be a little old to still be touchy with the teacher but at that age they're not a typical teen yet so who knows.
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>>1077166
Think it is possible to teach there if you have prior experience teaching English in other countries even without the bachelors?
>>
So are the majority of teaching children jobs in East Asia all about being the dancing foreign monkey?

Do they actually care about that the kids are learning things, or is it all about how fun and entertaining you are to the kids? I've heard even some adult teaching jobs want you to play games and be the funny, always smiling foreigner as opposed to an actual teacher.

What the fuck?
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>>1077313
>Think it is possible to teach there if you have prior experience teaching English in other countries even without the bachelors?
Think about how a private school would like to say their teachers are qualified. At what school in the US would it be acceptable for a teacher to have less than a bachelors? Preschools, teacher aides, that kind of thing.
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>>1077328
When you were going through school did you like the dgaf foreign language teachers that made you play games with your classmates all the time with the occasional test or the hard ass that just lectured you and gave you tons of assignments every day?

The qualifications are so low because most of the time people just want to have fun. Serious people go to serious schools, which have requirements for employees more difficult than "able to enter the country."
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>>1077313
It's absolutely not possible. You need a bachelor's degree, period.

>>1077328
>So are the majority of teaching children jobs in East Asia all about being the dancing foreign monkey?

>Muh dancing monkey/bear epic meme

I'm not even saying it's not true to an extent, but I'm so sick of this line being parroted word for word. It's irritating. Get a new joke.

>I've heard even some adult teaching jobs want you to play games

>Adult classes
>games

No.

If you want to be a "actual teacher", then stay home, get a state license and teach at home in a public school or something. If you want to have a new experience, have some fun, be a good resource for the kids who are into English and perhaps help get those who are not interested in English into it, give these kids some reprieve from their academic nightmare lives, and over all just be a nice guest/ambassador for a year or two, then ESL might be for you.

This guy puts it pretty well. Starting at 2:13 addresses this specific issue. (Although the whole video is very good, and applies to Japan as well--I've been in Korea and Japan).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0z71FHi2h3o
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>>1076886
Rules in China are different mate. And besides, I actually give a shit about them.

>And keep in mind, some students just don't give a fuck, and YOU can do nothing.

I'm completely aware of that, and I can tell you this kid is a completely normal kid that doesn't want to be stuck in a classroom during his winter break. Completely understandable, but I still have to stuff his head with some English.

>>1076894
>I dont know what country you're in but in China, I was told to yell at students if they get out of line, give them high fives when they're good and let them hug me and such if they wanted.

Pretty much this. I saw the principle man-handling a 12-13 y.o. and reprimanding her. Didn't slap her though.

>your native TAs are supposed to discipline the fart-sniffing brats.

no TAs.

>you probably need to be more stern with them cuz it sounds like they don't respect you at all.

yeah, but the problem is i'm a very patient guy. one of the teachers actually told me i'm treating the boys too nicely.

the children definitely like me, sometimes they hang around in the classroom before class just to be around me.

i don't think i would have such a problem with discipline if i actually had a lesson plan that they could all follow and kept them thinking and busy. for the 2 week semester i pretty much composed the next day's lesson the night before, or usually 3 hours before the class began. truth be told i was woefully unprepared, especially since my class is a mixed bag of 8-12 y.o.'s.

>because you never know what these slants will complain about and get you fired for next. It's a thin line.

actually, besides the first day i had problems with one of the kids, i never really got any complaints. and i wasn't really reprimanded but given a terse introduction to how things should run in the school, like not allowing students to go to the bathroom or get water during class and how to properly use the token system.

i even got a small bonus when i was paid today.
>>
>>1076957
I'd say fuck it. Tell them they should have asked for the check a lot sooner, as unless they fork over a few hundred bucks to make it happen over night it's not happening. Don't pay out of pocket yourself.

Teaching Arab brats for 2k a month doesn't sound worth it.

>>1077186
you will find something else.

>>1077394
Games can be useful, even with adults, but they have to have a clear didactic role. I'll usually only use them for reviewing vocab, and as short time-killers at that. The kind of zero-value shit done with kids is a waste though, yea.
>>
>>1077211
The same anon you are green texting.

>experienced elem teachers will tell you, the world over, students are molested at home or by someone they know more than you think. To act out for validation with intimacy for acceptance to other adults.

Jesus christ, man. This makes sense and it utterly breaks my heart if that is what might be happening to my student. I hope not honestly.

Anyway, all I can do is be firm with my body gestures. It's hard, of course, to completely communicate when my Japanese (or any other teacher in a foreign country with a foreign language) is basic.

>>1077236
I am teaching in the country side (not from JET though) and most mothers are super involve with their children's school lives. I guess in the country side the typical "bread winner" father and "stay at home" mother thing still exist as I never see fathers at all but I see mothers every day before, during, and after school.
>>
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I need advice

>currently studying in Education English Major for Secondaries (High schoolers, can't handle kids/too high energy)
>SEA monkey
>almost 30 because I fucked around and worked when I was younger

I'm reading $1500-2500 per month salary, which is pretty big considering the standards over here.
But how big is it when you're living in Japan/Korea? Is it enough to sustain you and save a fuck ton of money?
I hear being an "eikawa" pays good, is this true and is this harder to get compared to ESL/ASL teaching jobs?

Which is a better working environment for teachers, Japan or Korea?

What other programs aside from JET can I apply for when interested in teaching abroad?
>>
>>1077480
ESLfag living in Busan here

the 2.1 million KRW salary is plenty to live on comfortably

I've been here 6 months and I've put half my earnings in savings
>>
>>1077149
There are a lot less Asians in Slavic nations. Most of your students, if not all, would be white.
>>
>>1077471
When you say the country side, you mean to specify in Japan? Or do you mean countryside, which is one fucking word. You are a "teacher." Come on.
>>
>>1077498
You do get those hapas with slight Asian features.
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>>1077452
a police background check can be done online in the US, costs me $10 I can get FBI fingerprinting done in a day as well. The only background check I have ever had that took more than a day or so was Child Services. However, now PA has a new act 168 where they have to contact every previous job you ever had with kids. Unless the school is pulling something like that, it should be easy for an American to get everything for under $50
>>
Is it possible to teach in Japan with only a TEFL and no degree if I have a working holiday visa ? I don't care much about the pay I just want to be able to earn enough to live with my girlfriend for 6 month to a year while she wait for her Canadian citizenship, she already used her 1 year working holiday to come here so it's impossible for her to come here again.
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>>1077484
So, would around $800 dollars for rent and food work?
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>>1077167
Ask her to do a secret handshake, bump fists, or like the other guy say, a quick side hug. I like to bump fist and then make spirit fingers.
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>>1077605
That is to say, per month.
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>>1077501
Excuse me. Yes, i meant countryside.
>>
going to colombia tomorrow to teach for 5 months

i specifically avoided meme destinations
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>>1067103
Picture looks great.

>>1066828
>>1066847
>>1066874
What can you do with a Research Master in Social Sciences? Everyone here talks about teaching English in schools, but what about other studies? Is it realistic to teach social sciences at universities abroad? Any tips on how to realise this?

I really like the idea of working abroad, but is it all worth it? Don't you sometimes feel miserable/regret your choice?
>>
>>1078262
>s it realistic to teach social sciences at universities abroad? Any tips on how to realise this?
Maybe, maaaaaaybe, specializing on society in the country you're from, but even then I'm a bit doubtful. Social sciences tend to be country-specific, so the need for learning it outside the native language for a country is slim. Not saying it doesn't exist, but I doubt it would be easy to either find or get into.
>>
>>1078277
Hmm, maybe doing research abroad is more realistic than teaching... Maybe that's the solution.
>>
I'm an 18 year old girl, about to turn 19.. Only speak English, no schooling aside of Highschool.. What do you guys recommend me do, to eventually teach abroad?

I already left the country and did solo travel for a year once in NZ, I got a job and lived on my own and all that.. I can do that..

It's just.. What kind of degree should I go for here? Early/childhood education, maybe? I want something that I can go back to America and maybe teach with or something similar.
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>>1078438
>Early/childhood education, maybe?
lel. NO. Do you realize how little kindergarten teachers are paid? It's basically glorified babysitting. You do not want to 'teach' little Asian kids, it's a waste of life.

You could maybe try standard highschool-teaching degree, but it's also relatively low-paid.

Do something technical, as technical as you can. I don't know your abilities, but I work in a university and for example biotechnology students seems to be a) largely female and b) not that sharpest tools in the shed (no offence -- just mean that it must be a relatively easier course to get in to).

All you need to teach English abroad (in Asia anyway) is a Bachelor degree. Some other language skills and teaching (at your age, perhaps tutoring) experience will help. You're still so young that I also wouldn't be surprised if you never do follow up on this in 5 years time.

Also, tits. Post 'em.
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>>1078444
Thank you.

I've been looking into this since I was 14.. I don't think I'll change my mind, I just haven't researched it at all which is retarded on my part.

I love kids but yeah, that's like.. Not what I'd want to do my entire life I'm sure.

I dont even know what biotechnology is, but.. I dunno. I have no idea what to go to school for at all and it sucks.
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>>1078453
Well, you're 19 so you're young and still got some time to sort it out.

Either way, you need to think of future marketable skills for the career world.
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>>1078483
I am a little concerned though.. Most any BA/BS will work, for the most part? Even for a work visa in teaching, when my degree is for some other random ass shit? That doesn't seem right to me, for visa purposes..
>>
>>1078506
If it's in Asia, yes. They care about your white skin, native English-tongue (as long as it's not a strong accent). The Bachelor is just a gate-keeping formality.
>>
>>1078541
So when you apply for your working visa, I take it that the school does it for you, essentially? Normally, don't you have to work in the field that your degree is for?

Or is it, rather.. You just have to work in the field you were granted the visa for.. Sorry.
>>
>>1066828
About to sign up for a 120hr online TEFL course with 30hrs extra stuff added on, and am looking at teaching in China. Any tips?
>>
Is there a maximum length of time you can be an ESL in Japan or Korea?
>>
>>1078875

bumping this question
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