[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vip /vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y ] [Search | Home]
4Archive logo
black holes
If images are not shown try to refresh the page. If you like this website, please disable any AdBlock software!

You are currently reading a thread in /sci/ - Science & Math

Thread replies: 120
Thread images: 15
What's your opinion on black holes? What fascinates you the most about them?
>>
>>7785271
I just love to see Tyrell and Lashawn's faces when I get up all in their sister's black hole
>>
The fact that they are not real, yet used as a hyper sensationalized garbage in pop-sci films that attract DUDE WEED LMAO type of people
>>
I think Interstellar's interpretation of them is the most interesting one. And no one knows what happens inside a black hole, so it's a possible one as well.
>>
>>7785278
>the fact that they are not real

Well, this should be interesting
>>
Can I ask under what bases you're stating this on?

Black holes are places where ordinary gravity has become so extreme that it overwhelms all other forces in the Universe. Once inside, nothing can escape a black hole's gravity — not even light. Yet we know that black holes exist. We know how they are born, where they occur, and why they exist in different sizes.

Although, A black hole is a geometrically defined region of spacetime exhibiting such strong gravitational effects that nothing—including particles and electromagnetic radiation such as light—can escape from inside it. The theory of general relativity predicts that a sufficiently compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole. The boundary of the region from which no escape is possible is called the event horizon. Although crossing the event horizon has enormous effect on the fate of the object crossing it, it appears to have no locally detectable features. In many ways a black hole acts like an ideal black body, as it reflects no light. Moreover, quantum field theory in curved spacetime predicts that event horizons emit Hawking radiation, with the same spectrum as a black body of a temperature inversely proportional to its mass. This temperature is on the order of billionths of a kelvin for black holes of stellar mass, making it essentially impossible to observe. So, I would understand it if you had it hard to understand what a black hole, was, and/or how it works. But saying that they don't exist is like saying that the Earth is flat, just because you perceive it that way, doesn't mean it is that way.

Fun fact: There is a black hole in the middle of all galaxies, it is what causes them to stay in a shape. Our Sun also, along with the other millions of stars in our galaxy, orbits this black hole, this is known as a Cosmic Year, and our Sun is more than 20 cosmic years old.
>>
>>7785278
The long post is for you , idiot.
>>
File: nietzsche.jpg (632 KB, 1464x1986) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
nietzsche.jpg
632 KB, 1464x1986
>>7785360
>nothing can escape a black hole
Hawking radiation? X-rays?
>>
>>7785375

I don't think you read the whole thing properly, and I don't think you know what Hawking Radiation is, because a black hole slowly dies out, due to Hawking Radiation.

It is named after, physicist Stephen Hawking, who provided a theoretical argument for its existence in 1974, and predicted that black holes should have a finite, non-zero temperature and entropy.

''disk matter can be heated by friction to thousands of degrees which is enough to produceX-rays. Even higher temperatures approaching a million degrees can occurwhich can produce gamma rays.
This disk radiation, being outside the black hole, is what we detect as welook at black holes'' [1]

Sources: http://www.astronomycafe.net/qadir/q385.html
>>
>>7785417
I'll admit I skim read it. :(
>>
File: c640x360_32.jpg (20 KB, 640x360) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
c640x360_32.jpg
20 KB, 640x360
It's okay
>>
>>7785280

That's wormhole you retard.
>>
>>7785447
Please tell me you're not serious...
>>
>>7785461
If you think interstellar was about black hole then
you are fucking moron.
>>
From an outsider's perspective, how does infinite event horizon approach time work with finite time evaporation? Seems like the black hole would always evaporate before any objects could cross the event horizon, but how does that work with the perspective of the object falling in?
>>
>>7785447
I'm talking about Gargantua, not about the wormhole near Jupiter.
>>
File: black science guy.png (886 KB, 650x561) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
black science guy.png
886 KB, 650x561
>>7785271
>>
Obligatory:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QgNDao7m41M
>>
I'm a physics major, when will I learn about black holes?
>>
>>7785673
Beautiful
>>
>>7785485
Time slows down to an incredible crawl, but since any observers inside or outside of a blackhole cannot observe one another, it makes any kind of time dilation observations impossible.

Since the gravity would kill any living thing inside of a blackhole it's hard to say what the perspective of the object might be. It'd be slowing falling in blackness for eons why entrophy erases any character it has..
>>
File: hsaOso0.jpg (118 KB, 557x480) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
hsaOso0.jpg
118 KB, 557x480
>>7785673
>>
>>7785682
When you take a course in GR. The Schwarzschild solution (i.e. Schwarzschild black holes) is like the first thing you learn after learning EFEs.
>>
>>7785271
>What's your opinion on black holes?

I think that they are freaking huge, like galaxies in size or larger and that what's inside them isn't crushed or squished or what not. It's just that that section of space has so much mass, the light cannot escape and it looks like there is nothing there/the volume is small/etc. FWIW, it's been found that the mass of the observable universe and it's radius is the Schwarzchild radius - aka: we exist in a black hole.
>>
>>7785714
bullshit, doesn't work with BBT nor inflation, space expansion, redshift stuff and basically everything

I read about how our universe could be somewhat explained as a 3D event horizon of a 4D black hole, that one was better but not 100% either
>>
>>7785673
>>7785695
moar?
>>
>>7785700
fuck thats like a year and a half away
oh well its worth it thanks
>>
>>7785692
This has nothing to do with what I asked.
>>
>>7785271

I don't get one thing but i know shit about them... but how is it that Dark Matter works wonders with Gravity but Gravity doesn't affect Dark Matter. Black Holes are perfect examples of that, they should be fucking HUGE with that amount of Dark Matter around right?
>>
>>7785743
They are huge you stupid fucking faggot
>>
>>7785743
>Dark Matter works wonders with Gravity but Gravity doesn't affect Dark Matter

Dark matter isn't really well defined. It's mainly just a physical crutch used to explain the observed movement of regular "light" matter on the galactic scale. And I don't really understand why you think black holes should be "fucking HUGE" just because there's dark matter.
>>
>>7785743
gravity does affect dark matter
its just that because dark matter doesnt interact with EM there is no friction between dark matter stuff so they cant form stable blobs of dark matter because they just flung through and go on without losing velocity
>>
>>7785796
What? You don't EM to form "blobs", gravity is enough
>>
>>7785700
Will I also get to learn about Closed timelike curves?
>>
>>7785805
No, but you'll definitely get to learn about closed curvelike times
>>
>>7785271
>What fascinates you the most about them?
that they dont exist
>>
>>7785805
Maybe. Depends on the GR course. But either way closed timelike curves are kinda irrelevant because in all current attempts at quantization, they go away.
>>
>>7785805
hey fuck you pretending to be me on an anonymous chinese cartoon image board
>>
>>7785360
>We know how they are born, where they occur, and why they exist in different size

Actually - we don't know for sure that they exist.

We've observed the orbits of some stars orbiting a massive object - which gives us the upper limit of it's size and it's mass. General relativity predicts that such an object would be a black hole, but noone has ever seen an event horizon.
>>
>>7785803
no if there is no friction to slow them down
>>
Dark matter is still something that hasn't been proven as a theory or law or anything, so not a lot can be said on it's properties, how it interacts with other forces, objects, dimensions, whatever. But you do pose a very good question. I would recommend you Google up on that a bit.
>>
>>7785920
>but noone has ever seen an event horizon.

Because by definition it's impossible to do so
>>
>>7785461
A wormhole is basically a black hole but instead of the singularity point there's a throat that connects two black holes together.
>>
>>7785719
https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=black+science+man&espv=2&biw=1093&bih=534&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjTzbO58azKAhUG1hoKHUJ1BgsQ_AUIBigB#imgrc=bwvCFtCNzw6znM%3A
>>
File: Black_hole.png (832 KB, 1020x576) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Black_hole.png
832 KB, 1020x576
>>7786125
>Because by definition it's impossible to do so

Not really. You can't observe the horizon directly, but it does leave a shadow of sorts like pic related.
>>
So what kind of particles constitute Hawking radiation?
Is Hawking radiation "strong" near a black hole? Is it ionizing? Etc.
>>
>>7787916
the smaller the BH is the heavier the particles are
>>
>>7787925
>he heavier the particles are

photons are massless.

>>7787916
>So what kind of particles constitute Hawking radiation?

it is a black-body thermal radiation, so just like from any star it is a spectrum.

>>7787916
>Is Hawking radiation "strong" near a black hole?

No, it is practically unnoticable for black holes bigger than a grain of salt. A black hole with the mass of the Moon would only be like 3 K hot - the same as the microwave background radiation.
>>
>>7785803
push 2 balls towards each other on a table but dont let them touch, watch as they do not stop beside one another.
Without any friction 2 pieces of dark matter would simply oscillate in simple harmonic motion (think pendulums) passing through each other then flying off in opposite directions before their kinetic energy was entirely converted to potential energy and would then begin to move towards each other again.
Rinse and repeat.
>>
>>7787952
hawking radiation is not only photons
when the blackhole is nearing its death it emits all kinds of particles
>>
>>7787967
>when the blackhole is nearing its death it emits all kinds of particles

>The rate of temperature increase is exponential, with the most likely endpoint being the dissolution of the black hole in a violent burst of gamma rays. A complete description of this dissolution requires a model of quantum gravity, however, as it occurs when the black hole approaches Planck mass and Planck radius.

where did you get these 'all kinds of particles' from?
>>
The biggest black hole of the galaxy is your mom anus
>>
>>7787986
stephen hawkings books
in the last stages of evaporation massive particles start to be emitted
>>
>>7788054

but we do not know what happens during these 'last stages', as we don't have quantum gravity.

Anyway - I've always thought HR is just elelectromagnetic in nature.
>>
>>7788133
>but we do not know what happens during these 'last stages', as we don't have quantum gravity.

All of Hawking's black hole theories are quantum gravitational. They are obtained through quantization of GR, which holds for low energies.
>>
>>7785682
A first course in GR I'd imagine.
>>
>>7785280
Yeah, Interstellar has a interesting theory about black holes; its explication of a tetra-dimensional space with free movement through time, inside a black hole's event horizon was so great.
>>
>>7785280
That isn't supposed to be "inside" the black hole, the "advanced beings" created a little space inside the blackhole and/or moved Cooper outside of it into the generated fifht dimension thing before he could be eaten by the black hole.
>>
>>7785866
>me
>anonymous
I didn't say I were you, I just didn't specify I weren't.
>>
>>7787887
I heard they published a paper about this picture and how they simulated what a black hole would look like. I don't know why people still use the inferior version in the OP pic.
>>
>>7785271
>What's your opinion on black holes?

>>>/x/

The don't really exist.
>>
I've always found it weird that black holes have size to them. If it's infinitely dense, why isn't it infinitely small?
>>
>>7788917
It is. The size is the size of the event horizon.
>>
>>7788230
Anything happening after the scene of him approaching the black hole is just a plot device to remind folks that's it's a piece of fiction.
>>
Black holes remind me of why i love science.
Back holes remind me of why i love playing rogues.
Black hoes remind me of why i dislike black women.
>>
>>7789094
Thats nice.
>>
>>7785271
The fact that they are euphemisms for anuses(preferably woman)mmmhmm
>>
>>7788903

they did. It also discusses why the version that ended up in the film is slightly wrong - they decided not to include red-shift and they reduced the distortion of the horizon due to Gargantua's huge angular momentum.

you can read the paper here: http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0264-9381/32/6/065001;jsessionid=C233A0680E3FDA6A03106A2D0FA2B4F8.c1.iopscience.cld.iop.org
>>
>>7789094
You're speaking English, capitalize "i".
>>
>>7789153
Only big egotistical bastards refer to themselves in capital letters
>>
>>7789148
Apparently, (c) is the real one, then.
>>
>>7785375
Those are created by particle and anti-particle relationships right outside the event horizon, so they are not technically escaping the black hole
>>
http://www.space.com/31636-stephen-hawking-black-holes-have-hair.html


I kinda feel terrible for Hawking. He keeps on trying to figure these things out and they just don't work for him. He must be really frustrated.
>>
>>7789350
>trying to learn about something that isn't real from data that doesn't show anything about them

I'd be frustrated to.
>>
> What fascinates you most about them?

Spherical vacuum effect.
>>
>>7788917
By definition mass has to occupy space. It can be infinitesimally small I guess.
>>
>>7789397
Though infinitesimals aren't real values so there.
>>
>>7788917
Maybe it is made of Quantum Foam?
>>
>>7789404
Maybe they consist of unobservable energy, as in their spatial frequencies are incompatible with our technology. Anybody know if there's such a thing as a gravometer?
>>
what does a singularity look like inside a black hole? is there any model that describes its shape and color from the frame of reference of someone inside the event horizon?
>>
File: 1424589868126.jpg (8 KB, 250x238) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1424589868126.jpg
8 KB, 250x238
>>7789418
>what does an object so dense that light cant escape it look like?
>>
>>7789416
Very possible.

>>7789418
No. I'd imagine that it'd be swirly. Like a spiral. Color would have no meaning so you'd need to assign a color to it. Probably whatever color anything past ultraviolet would look like if you had receptors for it. Purple comes to mind. From an outside perspective it would probably take billions of billions of years to go from the event horizon to the main mass of the black hole regardless of your actual speed. Inside you'd probably pass yourself you'd be going so fast and it'd happen so quickly.

If black holes were a real thing that is.
>>
>>7789444
>can't see in the dark there's no light

Bring a flashlight you dolt.
>>
>>7789444
IT HAS TO HAVE SHAPE RIGHT?
>>
File: singularity.jpg (30 KB, 1000x1000) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
singularity.jpg
30 KB, 1000x1000
>>7789418
>>
>>7789512
in the endless cosmos, a single clap echoes.
>>
>>
File: 280px-Gendo_Ikari.jpg (12 KB, 280x210) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
280px-Gendo_Ikari.jpg
12 KB, 280x210
>>7789543
third impacto
>>
File: image.jpg (307 KB, 640x480) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
image.jpg
307 KB, 640x480
>>7786132
It's still a black hole in the sense that you're dead as fuck because both ends have that pesky event horizon from which nothing not even light can escape. But since it's collapsing at the speed of light you can't enter it any way.
>>
>>7789543
And yet virtually none of the star's mass ever gets eaten if the star had escape velocity. It just gets fucked by the tidal force.
>>
>>7789418
>the frame of reference of someone inside the event horizon

you can never cross the horizon in your own frame of reference. It keeps receeding from you until you hit the singularity.

video related

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eI9CvipHl_c
>>
>>7790352
thats the antihorizon. you cross the even horizon but never the antihorizon
>>
Fuck,I love threads like these.
LSD + /sci/ threads = perfect weekend
>>
File: 1451527619748.gif (326 KB, 367x225) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1451527619748.gif
326 KB, 367x225
>>7785278
>>
>>7788230

and book-shelves
>>
NOOB here. Is there an "other side" to black holes?
>>
>>7789418

It is unknown, however a startling theorem proves it actually smells a lot like charcoal
>>
>>7785271
They are teachings of the kuffar.
>>
>>7789266
(c) looks way cooler
>>
>>7788917
It is, all the matter/energy of the black hole is the infinitely small/dense singularity. We just find it suitable to extend its "size" to the event horizon since everything that passes this point can longer be observed and just becomes part of the singularity.
>>
>>7789448
From an outside perspective nothing even crosses the event horizon to begin with
>>
>>7790734
>From an outside perspective nothing even crosses the event horizon to begin with

IIRC the outsider just see the person frozen in time near the even horizon forever (longer than the universe's lifespan). It's why it's called the "event" horizon too, it's the last event of action the outsider sees from their frame of reference with respect to the other person
>>
>>7790497
Topkek a gentleman and a scholar
>>
>>7790700
apparently Nolan thought the general audience would be confused, and given the amount of shitposting there is about the movie already he was right.
>>
>>7785271

So this is what the Jews have turned our great accomplishments of physics into; a bunch of people arguing about unempirical speculative entities implied by ideas rooted solely in mathematics.

Philipp Lenard was right, no Jews in science please.
>>
>>7792306
go back to your containment board
>>
>>7785271
What fascinates me about black holes is the booty included.
>>
>>7785271

I wanna fuck a black hole
>>
>>7792621
/tg/ please go.
>>
Micro black holes, how do they work? If they have tiny masses (in the milli or micro gram range) how can they have gravity so that the escape velocity exceeds the speed of light? Wouldn't there be other forces at that scale that are substantially greater than any sort of gravity from a micro mass?
>>
I believe that black holes are how the universe is destroyed and created eventually all black holes will become one containing all elements of the universe eventually imploding thus releasing all elements contained within and recreating the universe over again
>>
>>7790860
Does this apply to photons too?
So is there a distorted image of the whole surrounding universe near every black hole's event horizon?
>>
>>7789444
czeched
>>
>>7789543
damn that 2U + v
too bad it broke under pressure
>>
>>7788246
the advanced beings is humanity itself retard
>>
>>7793405
this
>>
>>7789543
Just think hole many CPU hours this took to simulate and render.
>>
>>7793013

Becoming a singularity is just a matter of enough mass in a sufficiently condensed space. If you took 1 gram of salt and condensed it to an obscenely small space it would become a tiny black hole (which would immediately "evaporate" AKA explode)
>>
if you were to drop a camera into a black hole how long would it broadcast for
>>
>>7785360
i'm pretty sure the event horizon's definition is the point from the center in which the time component of the metric tensor flips signs and the fact that no light can escape is a mere product of that definition
but otherwise, you're correct
Thread replies: 120
Thread images: 15
Thread DB ID: 437459



[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vip /vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Home]

[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vip /vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Home]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.
This is a 4chan archive - all of the shown content originated from that site. This means that 4Archive shows their content, archived. If you need information for a Poster - contact them.
If a post contains personal/copyrighted/illegal content, then use the post's [Report] link! If a post is not removed within 24h contact me at [email protected] with the post's information.