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Homegrowmen (Farming and Gardening) Thread #43
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Old thread: >>654914

Companion Planting - Raised Beds - Vertical Gardening - Square Foot Gardening - Polyculture - Composting - Mulching - Vermiculture - Espalier - Fungiculture - Aquaponics - Greenhouses - Cold Frames - Hot Boxes - Polytunnels - Forest Gardening - Aquaculture

Resources:

Murray Hallam’s Aquaponics: (sample: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYR9s6chrI0 )

-Aquaponics Secrets DVD
-Aquaponics Made Easy DVD
-DIY Aquaponics DVD (Aquaponics The First 12 Months And Aquaponics DIY DVD)

Backyard Aquaponics
https://kat.cr/backyard-aquaponics-t4385398.html

400+ PDF BOOKS ON GARDENING
https://kat.cr/400-pdf-books-on-gardening-t3324399.html

Youtube channel Growingyourgreens, tons of videos on almost every single gardening subject,
https://www.youtube.com/user/growingyourgreens

Ollas clay pot watering system,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkNxACJ9vPI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvKq5geEM-A

USA Time of Year Planting Guide,
http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/what-to-plant-now-zl0z0903zalt.aspx

Food preservation,
http://nchfp.uga.edu/
https://kat.cr/complete-book-of-home-preserving-pdf-gooner-t10069401.html
https://kat.cr/canning-and-preserving-all-in-one-for-dummies-2011-mantesh-t5998098.html
http://www.allamerican-chefsdesign.com/admin/FileUploads/Product_49.pdf

Mushrooms, (culinary and psychoactive):
https://kat.cr/usearch/Stamets/

Mother Earth News' Vegetable Garden Planner program, (full version requires yearly subscription $fee)
http://www.motherearthnews.com/garden-planner/vegetable-garden-planner.aspx

Tons of Gardening/Farming PDFs
http://www.fastonline.org/?page_id=35
Aquaponics
http://www.fastonline.org/?page_id=32
>>
>>661534
US Farm Income and Taxes,
http://www.hobbyfarms.com/farm-marketing-and-management/farm-income-taxes-14991.aspx

US Grants and Loans for Small Farms,
http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?navid=GRANTS_LOANS
http://afsic.nal.usda.gov/farms-and-community/grants-and-loans-farmers
http://www.nal.usda.gov/afsic/pubs/funding.shtml

Managing Risks on Your Small Farm,
http://agr.wa.gov/Marketing/SmallFarm/managerisk.aspx

Chicken info and forum,
http://www.backyardchickens.com

Rabbit guide
http://www.agriculture.gov.tt/publications/manuals/rabbit-production-a-producer-s-manual.html

A public access seedbank for many types of rare or endangered plants; both edible and ornamental,
http://www.jlhudsonseeds.net/index.htm

Organic and heirloom selections:
http://sustainableseedco.com/
http://www.seedsofchange.com/
http://www.johnnyseeds.com/

Potato, Sweet Potato, and Tubers seed bank (free, but requies filling out forms and waiting in line):
http://www.cipotato.org/

Awesome interactive plant/gardening maps for USA, Canada, France, UK, BC, (frost dates, temp zones, etc):
http://www.plantmaps.com/index.php

Sprout seeds and info:
sproutpeople.org

Insect Habitats for attracting polinating bees, predatory/parasitic wasps, hibernating ladybugs, butterflies, etc.
http://www.inspirationgreen.com/insect-habitats.html

Toad and Hedgehog Habitats,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JetkWtw7Jc
http://familycrafts.about.com/od/frogcrafts/a/How_To_Make_A_Toad_Village.htm
http://www.bbc.co.uk/breathingplaces/hedgehog_home/
http://www.britishhedgehogs.org.uk/leaflets/L5-Hedgehog-Homes.pdf

Chili Peppers
http://www.fatalii.net/

More on Aquaponics & Aquaculture,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?&v=26xpMCXP9bw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?&v=_WgfaJjvfxA
http://www.appropedia.org/Aquaponics

Sourcing plants from the grocery,
http://www.diyncrafts.com/4732/repurpose/25-foods-can-re-grow-kitchen-scraps
>>
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I made a new graphic, just pasted some random crap together from google image search. Nothing special.

Here's the one without the number.
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>>661538
It's okay
Do monster plants tho from indoor gardening
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>>661553
Only if you give them enough light.
>>
So now with spring around the corner pretty soon and lots of stuff to be pre-grown indoors in the coming days and weeks, I've run very low on window sill space (also in other rooms).
I decided to start building a rack to put on the window sill. As of now, I've only completed the lowest deck (see pic), before you ask why I even made that one: Well, the window has a ca. 15cm broad rim and especially the lower pots wouldn't get enough light if placed directly on the sill, so I used to place cups, small paint buckets and whatnot beneath them for a lift, now it looks cleaner (I know I do need some extra bottom plates here and there though for better appearance - don't ask me why, but they are often more expensive than an accompanying pot the same size, maybe hardware stores want to frame you this way)

But I've wondered how to connect the upper decks (2 more to come) to the lower one, because obviously I can't screw the vertical "legs" anymore onto the deck in the same position, so there's only two options left, either "zig-zagging" the legs (changing the position slightly forth and back for each subsequent deck, better stability), or having them in the same position but using metal angle plates to fix them (looks better). Which of the two would you recommend? I'm not much of a craftsman, was already positively surprised of myself over the fact that I could saw the leg pieces sufficiently evenly, at least for the lowest deck (hope the error won't accumulate too much as I continue, I'll try keeping things level by filing the legs a little here and there if necessary)

(To be continued...)
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>>661571
(continued)
Oh and I forgot pic in previous post, here ya go

Another thing I thought about doing is adding flappable "doors" on hinges fixed on the room-facing side of the rack, and fixing alu foil on the plant-facing side of said doors, to increase lighting. But I fear that by doing this and cutting the air off the rest of the room like that, it may locally become too cold despite the double-glazed windows - it has been a very mild winter so far (it got to freezing like 5 nights total, in the worst one -2°C/28°F), but in very rare severe cases we might get down to -18°C/0°F here (record low).
So would it be sufficient if I installed a PC fan on each deck and let it run quietly (let's say 6V instead of full run 12V)? I do have a spare thermometer with radio connection to a station and then my PC via USB so I can monitor and track temps + humidity
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>>661390
Interesting. I'd also like to point out that the soil that I used, when placed in a pot after a few days, lowers by a number of pH levels from about 7-8 to 6. How is this so? Does the water dilute it/cause it to acidify? Do the plants do this?
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>>661572
>>661571
Leave gaps at the top and bottom of the reflector stuff to allow air flow. Use some window plastic and some standoffs to add another thermal barrier between the window glass and the plants. It should have about 1/8 of an inch airspace between the window and window plastic film for best results.

You also have the option of slipping a piece of cardboard between the plants and window at night. That and non-powered airflow via gaps at the top and bottom should do it. Another option for air flow it to use strips of foil covered cardboard and have air gaps anywhere you want, like that of window blinds.

As for the second level and additional levels, just make each one like its own table. Then stack them. You can use Velcro strips in an L shape on the insides of the corners where the bottom of the legs meet the top of the lower table. Then you can easily remove the Velcro and separate one level from the other if needed.

For my unit, I put aluminum foil on every surface and boxed it all in with foil-covered cardboard.
>>
>>661631
A lot of factors could do that. Water is the likely suspect. Check its pH level too. It should be as close to pH 7 as possible. If water isn't the answer then microorganisms/fungi may be doing it/or no longer doing whatever they were doing.
>>
>>661632

>>661632
>Leave gaps at the top and bottom of the reflector stuff to allow air flow
I guess I will check whether "passive" air flow management is sufficient, and only add in fans later in case it's not
>Use some window plastic and some standoffs
Eh, won't that suck off even more light than the window glass already does?
I'm at 50°N (which means only 8h of daylight in late December and a midday solar altitude of just below 17°) and the window is ENE-facing, so I really gotta get as much as possible out of the little light I receive (with spring nearing it's getting better though now day by day)
>As for the second level and additional levels, just make each one like its own table. Then stack them. You can use Velcro strips
Hmm, is that enough for stability? I fear I might tip shit over if I'm not super careful only once.
Now after pondering a bit about it, thinking of diagonal drilling which could solve the issue (I could always undrill stuff if necessary)
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>>661642
>Eh, won't that suck off even more light than the window glass already does?

Less than 10% of what ever is left from the windows gets reflected/refracted I think.

>I'm at 50°N (which means only 8h of daylight in late December and a midday solar altitude of just below 17°) and the window is ENE-facing, so I really gotta get as much as possible out of the little light I receive (with spring nearing it's getting better though now day by day)

My winter indoor stuff gets only 4 hours of direct sun a day. The rest is ambient.

>Hmm, is that enough for stability?

It all four legs are Velcro'd down it'd take a big accident to break them loose. The entire thing will tip first.

>thinking of diagonal drilling which could solve the issue

That is "toenailing" and make sure you drill pilot holes first it it may split the wood.
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>>661538
Caption this

"Homegrowmen"

Growing plants inside
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>>661769
THIS
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>>661553
Pumpkins monster pretty well indoors
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So, I know this is sad and everything but I have been trying to find something to do with my life and also while I look for a job. I've been kind of interested in pursuing a small worm farm (to start out) and sell the castings that I'll get from that. I've been looking around and seeing competing prices for national sales on eBay and the like, and I think I could compete with that. I've also found out that there is zero anything like that around my town or even the neighbouring city, which I think is something I could "exploit."

Anyone do it or think it could be done? Doesn't look too hard, and it would seem to help my own garden too.
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>>661778
If you have the fortitude, tools, and area to get started it at least a med-range size worm farm, yes. In the end, if nothing sells well, you can have a great source of soil amendment and fishing bait.
>>
>>661781

What amount of fortitude would I need?
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>>661786
Like doing this about 50 times larger,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srTrDpxm1Uk
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>>661839

This bitch is annoying.
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>>661778
I got worms.
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>>661897
See a doctor m8
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look at my ENTIRE delphiniums.
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>>662013
>delphiniums

What kind? Delphinium luteum, Delphinium elatum, Delphinium ____? I have Delphinium tricorne.
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Is there a cost efficient way to do one of those stop motion videos?
I'd like to try that with my seedlings, and see the progress over days.
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Hey, /out/, /an/ recommended this thread to me instead.

So, I was given a very large branch of a lovely jasmine shrub from a relative, and I placed short sections of it (~25cm) in water, hoping they'd send out roots from between the segments so I can later plant them in soil; but (while still alive and green) they don't take out roots in the water, as other segmented plants have for me.

I've very little experience, is there a way to encourage it to grow, like adding certain nutrients to the water? Or is this method not even feasible with jasmine? It worked for me with similar plants before.
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>>662177
Just to add, they've been in the water for about a week now, enjoying the windowed sunlight but not much else.
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>>662110
they're mongrels.

picture related, mother plant.
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>>662135
If you don't have a dedicated camera with such a function, use your phone, find some app that takes a pic every x seconds, then fix the phone in place somehow, downside is you can't use your phone for however long you want it to run, so you gotta have an old backup one or something
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>>662177
Some cuttings may take extremely long before they start developing roots, it's very dependent on species. My cherry plum and privet ones took about 3-4 months to do so, meanwhile rosemary, tomato and harlekin willow took between one and two weeks.
Temperature and light may play a role too, so if it's (sub-)tropical plants, maybe consider putting them on a radiator to ensure higher temps
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>>662262
Thanks! I'll wait, then - I really want them to take root and grow in soil, for sentimental reasons if nothing else.

How should I handle them in the meantime? They're just set in small jars / bottles of water, and I don't want them to rot or die from improper treatment; should I replace the water every few days? Is there a solution of compost / nutrients I should look for, or is water and some sunlight enough to sustain them?

I was heard about adding the leftover water from hardboiling eggs or steamed vegetables, but that just sounds like old wives' tales.
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>>662272
I have no experience with your species at all - but in general when trying to root cuttings in water, you should remove at least the lower 2/3 of the foliage (only leave a few on the top), and don't let humidity drop too low (which might happen indoors in winter, so consider putting a plastic bag with some holes over it) - both measures are to ensure that it doesn't dry out.
You could try adding root hormones to speed things up, but I've never personally done that, so no experience here either. Adding willow cuttings to the same glass may or may not have a boosting effect too (apparently it releases salicylic acid which is supposed to encourage root growth)
If the water seems to become murky/mouldy after a couple days to weeks, replace it with fresh one the same temperature.
Again it differs from species to species (sometimes even different varieties or cultivars of the same species may behave very differently - and some are even near impossible to propagate that way, like oaks), maybe someone else has experience with what you're trying to grow... good luck
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>>662135
If you have a camera just set it up and start clicking away once every x amount of time. If you have a webcam there may be software online that can do it automatically for you.

Try programs like VideoVelocity or Webcam Timelapse

>>662177
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/propagate-jasmine-cuttings-45959.html

Wait longer. If you have root hormone or willow cuttings, add those. Some plants need to keep the same water all the time while others benefit from having their water changed daily. The water you are using and the temperature can affect the outcome.

>>662192
Oh, nice.
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>>661571
Update on my rack progress: Now built and added the upper two decks, went with diagonal screwing which posed no problems (used rather thin screws though).
I didn't manage to cut the legs very perfectly even so the whole thing isn't 100% straight, but eh it's not supposed to look too good for €20
The window sill apparently isn't very straight either (slightly slopes down towards the room side) so I had to place some cardboard below the legs. The whole system is very stable though, so I'm content with it so far.
Haven't added the aluminium foil flaps yet and I'll probably delay it for a while because next week there's supposed to be a severe cold wave rushing in (night time lows down to -6°C/+21°F) so I'm gonna wait that one out first
>>661683
>My winter indoor stuff gets only 4 hours of direct sun a day. The rest is ambient.
Oh you might've misunderstood me, 8 hours is the theoretical maximum of direct sunshine we can get here the whole day in mid-winter, and 2-3 hours is the theoretical maximum for my window. But most of the time it's overcast here so it averages out to maybe 0.5h/day (and that at very low angle), with the rest being ambient
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>>662300
>>662290
Thanks, to both of you! I'll keep these in mind, the link is also useful. I haven't thought about humidity - my AC is heating the apartment most evenings so I'll try to keep some of them under plastic bags, and keep them all away from the AC. If things turn out well and there's a similar thread I'll report back with some pictures.
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>>662304
Looking good!

If you need more stability you can add a "skirt" around the bottom of each shelf. This image shows wireframes of where each skirt board would go. The 1 red board in the back near the window, the 1 orange board in the foreground near the camera, and the 2 green ones on either side. What these do is to prevent sideways forces from simply folding it up. How far down they come on the legs is up to you. This will make very solid. You could even skip using the red one so more light gets in.

>2-3 hours is the theoretical maximum for my window.
>0.5h/day

Yeah, you need as much foil as you can get surrounding your stuff then. Consider adding some artificial light if you are able. Foil the tops/bottoms of the shelves to so they reflect light down and up. Ever see photos online of weed grows in small boxes? They are nothing but reflective surfaces.

You couldn't do that if they were getting full sun, it'd cook them in a minute.
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>>662324
>If you need more stability you can add a "skirt" around the bottom of each shelf
Might consider that if I run into issues later on, but as you can imagine, I have to think twice about every measure that reduces light inflow.
>Yeah, you need as much foil as you can get surrounding your stuff then. Consider adding some artificial light if you are able. Foil the tops/bottoms of the shelves
I will definitely add the alu-foiled flaps on the room-facing sides of the shelves, and probably also the tops, but I fear that if I do that on the bottoms too it will scratch and tear too quickly for little relative benefit - so maybe I could put some acrylic glass on top?

I do have an LED growing light too elsewhere, but it's already preoccupied by very light-intensive stuff like basil and thyme. The figs under there look shit for some reason though (upper left, browning leaves), I suspect it's because I kept watering wrong (always only a little), without considering that salt concentrations might build up over time this way using the tap water - I came to this realisation only yesterday and therefore "flushed" all my room plants, i.e. watered them very intensively several times so that a lot leaked out of the drain holes and discarded that drain water every time, hope this way I brought the salinity back down to acceptable levels and they'll recover
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>>661534
What font is that in the image?
>>
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Rate
>>
i got a Red Lion Amaryllis Bulb growing kit for christmas
how can I ensure the best growth?
i live in FL and it will be inside
t. a visitor from /fa/
>>
>>662364
Harrington

I've had it since like the 1990s.

>>662411
5/10 for effort
3/10 for thumbnail readability
3/10 for font selection to reflect content
2/10 for no font stroke for increased readability
0/10 for adding site name to it

Counter-rate, please.

I have misgivings for using a photo that is "outside" when the meme is for "inside".
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>>662436
>I have misgivings for using a photo that is "outside" when the meme is for "inside".

I made an alternate, one that is inside.
>>
>>662442
>>662436
Okay I get it, cool
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>>662442
>You will never have a sex plant
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>>662442
>>662436
What weird movies are these from?
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>>662516
This, >>662436 is from the original Day of the Triffids. There is a modern miniseries for it too which was decent.

This, >>662442 comes from the movie "Little Shop of Horrors" which features Rick Moranis. It is based on a stage play and has lots of singing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfcPnul77T8
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>>662545
Are they about indoor gardening? Man greenhouses must be terrifying
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>>662831
>Are they about indoor gardening?

The DotT miniseries and LSoH are.
>>
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I'm trying to grow peppers indoors with a regular 30 watt halogen bulb from the supermarket on a 12h timer in the corner of my kitchen. So far it's been going pretty well.
Right now I have 5 Black Naga, 4 Bishops Crown, 1 Carolina Reaper, and 1 "Fatalii Gourmet Jigsaw" from the shop in the OP. About 3 seedlings turned brown and died, probably because the bulb was too close in the first week.
I just separated them today, which was way too late, but it's still easy when you put the whole earth ball into a water container and move it around until the earth breaks off and you can gently separate the roots.
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>>662880
My Serranos are doing fine by a south facing window and I'm at 45°N
Mind you it was a fully mature plant when I brought it inside
I've self pollinated it and is so far growing two peppers and preparing to flower some more
>>
This is my first attempt at growing mushrooms. I'm using pf tek to grow pink oyster mushrooms. Does anyone have any tips or suggestions? I'd like to see some other setups if you've got pictures.
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>>662914
Are you doing this indoors?
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>>662974
In a shed. It's kinda /out/
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>>662986
I hope you keep the shed locked
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>>662914
Very nice. All my old pics are long gone due to multiple HDD failures (lightning strikes). I raised the regular pearl oyster ones from a fungi.com kit some years ago and made extra kits from it. Right now all I have are a few very old shiitake mushroom logs left. I need to make more of those the next time they flush.

I have a complete setup for making tons of kits in jars; pressure canner, canning jars, etc.

the biggest tip I can give you is to keep a sharp eye out for black mold. Totally remove anything you see that has it. Always wash your hands well before opening or handling the growing medium or picking the mushrooms.

What do you do with yours? I cook with mine as much as I can while they are fresh. After that I either pressure can them or dehydrate them and vacuum seal them in jars.
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>>663101
I made an omelet with a few big ones and I'm probably gonna dry the rest. Pretty good.

I've heard mold is the most difficult thing about growing mushrooms. No contamination this batch, but I've seen pictures that make me scared.
>>
I'm starting an internship tomorrow that requires me to leave at 6 every day.
I have a few potted seedlings I've been growing with a grow lamp, do seedlings have a dedicated schedule for light? Would it go horribly wrong if I gave them light from 6PM-10PM instead? It's either that or leave the lamp on until I get back 12 hours later.
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>>663311
Maybe buy a timer? Those thing go for like €5. I'd set it to around 14 hours if they stand completely dark otherwise (or subtract an appropriate amount of time if they get natural daylight too)
>>
Is it possible to grow herbs indoors? I have a pot with Rosemary, Sweet Mint, and Lavender in my apartment at the moment. They're sitting in a room that gets decent sun and are also under a lap (not pictured).

The weird thing in the vase is a hyacinth that I was going to take to work.
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>>663429
Yes
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>>663429
>>
>>663429

They grow great indoors. I have parsley, sage, mint, and two types of basil in one of those 3-gallon Aquafarm setups (using Sunfish instead of Betafish). It catches mid-day sun and I have a E27-socket LED grow light (about 6W) on it all night.
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>>663429
sure if you let your house temperature drop to about 60F, otherwise that rosemary is going to die.
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>>663610
They do fine indoors 55-80F. It is just they are best kept around 60-65F.
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>>663631
>80F
that's going to kill them during the winter.

you MIGHT get away with that during the summer.
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>>663610
i dont believe you my rosemary survives like low 40s
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>>663641
that's good.

it just can't deal with high temperatures during the winter.
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Maybe you guys can help me out with some home grow problems. I have a lot of succulents including most in a big ass pot that doesnt fit on a windowsill. The ones that do fit on the window sill are doing bretty good, however this big pot is a pain in the ass. It would be doable if I was home all day to constantly move it back into the sunlight but i'm not. How can I make sure they get enough light? I have 3 grow lights, one is a couple of thise long tube bulbs(flourecent?) That i've used to start veggies inside before. The other is a big ass CFL light bulb and the last is some light that glows purple(has bands of red and blue) like the kind people grow weed with.

Also how can I get more window sill space? All my window sills are too small to put anything besides a 1" pot on
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>>663657
Put a fucking table by your window and make sure it's a south facing window. If you're keeping it by a south facing window and your latitude isn't too far north they'll do fine, or just keep your lights on them anyway

What was the point of those questions?
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>>663659
I was asking because I wanted to know if there was any difference between which light I should use. And if I should keep them by the window, then put the light on it at night or if the window by itself would be fine
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>>663657
A table like the other anon says is a simple easy way to do this. The way I did it was to install a shelf board on top of the window sill. It is nice and wide for pots to sit on. I can always remove it and the original window sill is right under it. I even made a second shelf above that for additional plants. My largest window is from floor to ceiling so I just have a multi-tier metal storage shelf unit there.
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>>663662
Use the light and window both and at the same time. Don't use them at night or you can mess up the plant's cycles.
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>>663666
I have them on a stand right now, it's just irritating because I have to re adjust them into the sunlight as the day goes on. Which sucks because I have school and work.
>>663668
I will do this
>>
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you fags got any recommendations for my winter hardy fern brick wall?
>>
>>663687
Adiantum aleuticum
>>
>>663687
Chicks and hens
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>>663687
Tear it down, it looks like a poor person wall
>>
>>662447
It's called the poppy.
>>
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>>663719
I should be able to get Adiantum pedatum 'Imbricatum', which looks sort of like that.
>>663733
there's a ton in it, they just look like shit at the moment.
>>663760
that is the point.

my other wall looked like shit when I first build it as well.
>>
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>>664226
it still looks kind of like shit.

but that's how these ferns grow.
>>
>>664227
the other part of the wall are newer bricks.

it's probably going to be a few years until moss and shit starts growing everywhere, then it should look pretty good.
>>
>>664227
I like the idea of a degraded old wall, but that looks too messy.
In the end it does not look that bad, but the concrete make it still look a bit disgusting
>>
>>664231
the concrete is essential for the ferns.
>>
>>664231
It just needs to be about twice as tall I think.

I had a ancient big cellar house retaining wall made of stone. I put all sorts of local ferns, moss, and lichens in it and they did really well.
>>
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To my CanadaBro partner in the seed swap. If you're here I just want to let you know I resent another packet of seeds because I think the first one was lost or something.

Hope it gets to you this time.
>>
Just started muh seeds for the first time ever. I planted:
Foxglove
Lavender
Morning Glory
Forget-me-not
Rosemary
Parsley
Dill
Spicy Green Mustard
White Onions

I have the seed kits in an East facing window which gets a good amount of sunlight during the day (only south facing windows I have are in my bedroom and are quite drafty). In total I have about 81 planters. Anyone want to take bets on how many actually germinate?
>>
Can I get an ID on these cuttings? I got them from my grandparents, they've said it's a jade plant but the leaves seem completely different from what I can tell
>>
>>664699
Morning glories are invasive monsters, FYI
My lawn is part morning glory because I tore down my overgrown vines and apparently threw the seeds everywhere.
>>
>>664699
same seed tray
>>
>>664728
They'll be growing out of a hanging planter thing on a 2nd story porch. I'll dead-head them to prevent invasiveness.
>>
>>664482
I sent you peppers right?
>>
>>664735
Have you used it before? How well does it work?
>>
>>664741
Yep that's me.
>>
>>664710
Most likely a jade plant.

>>664728
>Morning glories are invasive monsters, FYI

I can attest to this. I thought the 2 vines with wee tiny colorful flowers where cut as fuck. Now I have many 100s of the little fuckers EVERYWHERE. They even grow in the gravel like some hydroponics freak. I'm sure that years from now, every time I disturb the soil in the garden 100s more will pop up.
>>
>>664457
it would be too colossal, my garden isn't big enough for that.
>>
Anyone know how to grow moss?

I have some in a large jar at the moment filled with rocks at the bottom for drainage. They've stayed alive for about 2 weeks now but haven't grown much. What do I need to do?
>>
>>664980
moss doesnt grow much.
>>
Has anyone here ever grown dwarf tamarillo (Cyphomandra abutiloides)?

If so, how and where did you grow it?

Most importantly, how did the fruit taste?
>>
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>>664841
Good luck, they turned out great for me, pic related
>>
>>664842
>>664728
The seeds germinated in less than 24 hours. I'm kinda scared...
>>
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Also, pretty sure my rosemary seeds are all fucked... looks like they've already started getting moldy and rotten.
>>
>>665406
Are you doing this inside?
>>
>>664710
Probably a jade. There's two different types of jades, one is big leafes the other is small, I have both and that just looks like a small leaf jade
>>
>>665429
yes
>>
>>665450
Fuck man, it could already be too late
>>
>>665463
To stop the morning glory? I have already resigned myself to my fate.
>>
>>665406
morning glories are evil invasive beasties
>>
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Just finished digging 40cm down into the clay and put down drip irrigation and tested it all out today, happy so far.

What should i fill it with anons? I was thinking sandy loam first, compost and chicken manure, then some of the better part of the clay mixed in with some decent soil; or should I layer it another way/mix it all together?

Not entirely sure what I want to plant out yet, I have loads of sweet basil, sage and thyme, kale, silverbeet, zuchhini, cucumbers and cherry tomato seedlings to put out, as well as lemongrass i'd like to split up and grow (in the pic)

Dead in the middle of summer here, so i've been dodging 95-100F temps to get the work done on this, good thing a cool change is here for a few days, but the winds are pretty high now so seedlings might need a bit of cover if I plant them out
>>
>>665411
Did you use potting mix or compost anon?

I've had similar problems with compost that wasn't fully broken down getting mouldy before.

Another possible cause is your flats, it helps to sterilise them between uses. A solution of 80% methylated spirit and 20% water works really well and is cheap.
>>
>>665411
put some ventilation on it next time
>>
>>665609
Drip irrigation is better on the surface dude. Water will just flow to the end because the particulate matter will clog the holes
>>
>>665611
Got some new planter pots to attempt the rosemary and some seed starting soil to re-do the sections that got hit with the mold.

Would removing the plastic cover kill the mold/save the other seedlings? Would it be possible to re-use the cells where I had the rosemary to plant moonflower seeds (with new soil)?
>>
>>665610
I used a burpee seed starting kit. I have no idea what the soil is made from (brand new to this) but I assume compost since I see pits of twig/root here and there... and also the mold.

On the plus side, it looks like literally everything else has germinated! Except for the foxglove, but I think that will take a while...
>>
My gf and I are looking to buy our first home in the upcoming months. We're hoping to have a piece of the back yard for a garden so that we can grow our own veggies.
I live in south east Texas. Any tips?
I've never grown a garden, but I'm really anxious and want to do this so bad.
>>
>>665869
From the netafim website for my drip hose:
"Each dripper has pressure compensating, to allow for fluctuating water pressures, and no drain features which allows the water to stay within the tube when the pressure is turned off to avoid blockages. It can be installed on the soil surface or covered with mulch to irrigate garden areas, but is best suited to sub-surface installations"

The stuff I'm using is designed to be laid 10-50cm underground for corn irrigation etc.
>>
>>666066
i stand corrected

good stuff anon. I've seen that stuff before and the instructions warn about burying it. Looks like you know what you're doing.

You should grow corn btw
>>
>>665945
Don't plant too much at once.
Don't plant everything you have of 1 thing at 1 time.
Don't plant everything of 1 thing in 1 spot, spread it around with a good buffer area between them.
>>
>>666082
I am growing corn at the moment, but because of being in a shallow raised bed and not getting super reliable watering it has dwarfed and suffered a bit. I probably will grow a little more corn and maybe some bush or pole beans this time.

The raised beds were good enough, but we're getting about 260mm of soil moisture evaporation and the beds were only about 400mm deep in total; so I've learnt a lesson there and am moving on to furrows with deep irrigation and a combo of plastic mulch and straw mulch now for water conservation.

Predictions for watering the dugout area are that it'll need about 160L a week in this hot weather, so I'm still figuring out how long I need to keep the drippers running to achieve that so I can set a timer accordingly.
>>
>>664228
there's a diy on how to make moss grow on rocky surfaces and brick if you want it quickly.
>>
>>666206
http://www.stencilrevolution.com/tutorials/how-to-make-moss-graffiti/
>>
>>666086
Im not the guy you replied to but why shouldn't you do any of these things? I've always grown my veggie garden doing all those things and I almost always get great turn outs
>>
>>666097
Oz?
>>
>>664710
Jade 100% certainty. I have a shitton in my garage avoiding the nightly frost.
>>
Does anyone have any suggestions on cloning thin stemmed plants like oregano? I began herb gardening last year and had terrific success. My oregeno plant is ridiculously tangled and bushy. In a week or a month depending on the north Florida weather (its 70 today but may well be 30 next week), I want to propagate my sole oregano and spread it around my yard.

Like I said, my concern is how thin the stems are. Will it be any issue?
>>
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>>666409
"Oregano"
>>
>>666361
>Don't plant too much at once.

Emphasis on the word "too" and in you planted so much it adversely impacts the other plants or there's so much work for you to do you can't keep up and the plants suffer because of it.

>Don't plant everything you have of 1 thing at 1 time.

Stagger your planting times to help avoid pest cycles as well as having continuous crops available as they mature in succession.

>Don't plant everything of 1 thing in 1 spot, spread it around with a good buffer area between them.

Buffer zones between your crops helps contain disease and pests. If a blight breaks out in 1 tomato bed, you will have time to take care of the problem without it spreading to the rest of your plants in other locations. A buffer zone can be a blank space or filled with another type of plant that isn't susceptible to the types of plants near it. Buffer zones are normally over 20 feet wide. Mine are over 100 feet wide and I plant in 3 locations. Good thing too, aphid massacre in one, wind damage in another, mildew, etc. Each event was isolated and easily fixed in the smaller location than it would have been had everything developed a sudden problem at once.

It should be noted that I have found that companion planting allows for smaller buffer zones.
>>
>>666385
Yeah son.
>>
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>>666428
Its not a euphemism I swear, and if it was then I wouldn't be asking. Marijuana has thick, strong stems.
>>
>>666409
Apparently it works with basil, which also only has tiny "stems"
Here's some guy doing it (in German though, skip to 1:57 to see the roots he claims appear after 10-15 days): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-34p9BCr9E
So I figure it should work for things like oregano too (that said I personally tried with lemon balm in a similar way last May but it didn't work at all)
>>
>>666409
>>666734
>>666752
The method I've used is to take a longish stem and break off 2-4 sets of leaves if it's something like rosemary, thyme etc and plant them straight into propagation sand and water them in with full strength seaweed extract.

Put a lid on the container to keep moisture in and keep everything dar and keep checking each week to see see if there's any new growth on the cuttings.

I don't know how much new growth is needed before you plant them out into pots and start hardening them off, but a few new sets of leaves should be adequate for most plants I'd say.

It's up to you whether you want to use root hormone or not, I hear mixed opinions all the time but the powder seems to get better results than the gel consistently from what I hear.
>>
Nice board.
>>
>>661572
Alu isn't an effective reflecting material
>>
>>663429
Do not let roots in light, they don't like it
>>
>>666086
Thanks. Do you have any tips on accompanying flowers for stuff like cucumbers, tomatoes, or corn?
>>
>>667040
It isn't meant to be for plants. Even white-painted cardboard will do, but foil is preferred.

>>667132
For companion planting? Check out trap plants and pests that eat them that also eat your target plant. You can make buffer zones of preferred trap plants to lure the pests away from the target plants. There are a few types of flowers you can use for this.

Check out 3-sisters method too.

Just make sure what you are using compliments the other plants and does not compete specifically for certain things.
>>
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guys,

I've been growing this pineapple for 4 years this spring. I'm in Canada at 45N. In the summers I keep it outside for about 3 months, then bring it back inside.

Will it ever flower inside? Is the weather here too shitty for it to even flower during summer outside? This pic is a bit old, the plant is bigger than this now
>>
>>667184
Is that a watering bowl for the pineapple?
>>
>>667040
Aren't pretty much all metals highly reflective? So what's significantly better though for very cheap? I'm not buying some "extra special $$$ foil" just because it's 5% more effective or so
>>
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>>661534
Just a picture to keep those interested up to date. Pumpkin ~1 month old.
>>
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>>667327

Looking good. Glad you're still alive.
>>
>>667207
Incase he gets thirsty when I'm not home
>>
>>667355
Adorable, anon.
>>
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>>667184
Mine all flowered their second year.

Let the soil dry out a bit and keep it in low light. Then oversaturate it with water and give it as much light as possible. That should shock it into producing a flower.
>>
>>667239
It is fine, use normal aluminum foil. Mylar is more durable if you need to keep it loose. Otherwise, just glue foil to cardboard.
>>
>>667440
thanks, I'll try this anon
think I could do it inside?
>>
>>667443
Of course.
>>
>>667533
I watered him today, I'll wait a few days then take him away from the window. I just want it to flower desu senpai
>>
>>667336
lel
we need something like this for new OP image

>>666924
r u new senpai?
>>
This is a stupid question, but how much soil area do you need to have any decent supply of small plants, or even mushrooms for consumption? I live in an apartment and it seems like even if I grew something in a pot like herbs and/or other small plants I would barely get any use out of em before they were gone.
>>
>>667570
dude
niggas in homegrowmen are growing lemons, pineapples and fucking pumplins inside

anything is possible, just stay sage.
>>
>>667579
Well alright then, guess I'll go to the nursery and get some seeds and pots tomorrow.
>>
>>667583
what's your latitude?
>>
>>667584
37.4 approximately.
>>
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Trenchanon here,

Just got some more work done filling the trench with some of the clay soil that i took out. I sifted out all the big chunks, old concrete from post holes and other crap and it looks good.

Next I think will be a layer of well rotted compost, chicken manure and then some really nice sandy loam and it'll be ready to put down my plastic mulch and plant.

Getting pretty excited now, It's gonna be awesome when everything is planted in: I think, kale, corn, zucchinis, lemongrass, basil and maybe a cucumber or 2 might be able to squeeze in.

Also decided to grow some salvia farinacea in a nearby bed that'll share some of the groundwater, I hope it'll do a decent job of attracting bees and beneficial insects!
>>
>>667587
Put your seedlings by a south facing window, they'll get better light that way
>>
>>667540
see
>>662442
perhaps

>>667570
>>667583
It all comes down to how much light the plants have access to indoors or how much you are willing to spend on lights and electric. If there is enough light, you can grow anything you want, baring space considerations of course.

>>667690
How old is the chicken manure? It can take as much as a year to compost before you can use it. If it is covered with a plastic mulch where light and fresh air can't get to it, it can take longer than a year to compost. When turned every so often it can take as little as 4 months to compost correctly.

If it isn't composted correctly, it can introduce pathogens to the plant that can harm it and pathogens from the plant to you and harm you.
>>
>>667759
>If it isn't composted correctly, it can introduce pathogens to the plant that can harm it and pathogens from the plant to you and harm you.

As well as root burn to the plants caused by too much nitrogen. Chicken manure is really "hot" with nitrogen.
>>
>>667759
i think the pathogens are more for new seedlings (the bacteria that breakdown tissue attacks the soft roots) but I don't think it effects larger mature plants.
>>
>>667760
He might be okay if it's just a small amount mixed well with the rest of the ingredients.

>>667690 Anon, how much chicken manure will be making up the mix? If its something like a quarter of the total, I think you'll be alright, but any more and I'd be worried.
>>
>>667815
id advise putting it more so to the bottom as to not burn seedlings
>>
>>667759
>>667760
>>667814
>>667815
>>667818
Additional info.

http://www.hgtvgardens.com/chickens/backyard-chickens-the-straight-poop-on-using-chicken-manure-as-fertilizer
>>
>>667819
Thanks anon, will keep that in mind if I ever come across chicken manure. Mostly I just amend my soil with my composted grass clippings and scraps. Some blood/bone meal if needed. I don't usually have access to good, composted manure, living in the city and all. Unless I want to shell out ridiculous money for the bagged kind at the store.
>>
I'd like to grow strawberries in gutters to keep the fruits away from the goddamn slugs, but I'm worried about wether or not they'll overwinter outside? Live in zone 5b and I dont have a garage to keep them in. What do?
>>
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>>661534
im back...
>>
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lemon seedlings sprouted and outgrew the rosemary overnight! the little ones are lavender
>>
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>>667901
previous update ~almost two weeks old
>>
>>667901
Adorable. Which ones are the lemons? Is it the dark-leafed ones in the far left corner.
>>
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>>667969
here
>>
>>667759
The manure is ancient my lad, it's broken down extremely well and has been sitting for 8 or so months after it stopped breaking down so i'm not too concerned about E. Coli and other pathogens being a problem.

The actual manure i'm using is only a chicken feed bag worth so it's probably about 20-25kg at most for 3.3 sq m/11 sq ft of area.

As for the Compost, It's aged about a year and i turned and aerated it religiously in the first 2 months and fed it loads of brewing malt and grass clippings; I've grown stuff in it even when it was less aged and it's good stuff so far.

>>667818
Thanks for the advice anon, I'll scrape out a little trench and put it in there to get down a little further. The trench is shallower than it looks though, I've still got another 15-20cm or so to fill in yet.

>>667901
>>667980
Nice work anon, them some kawaii lemons for sure.
>>
>>667854
Well, regardless of what raw materials you are using, you need to compost it. Like grass clippings for instance. If they are fresh they are very hot both temperature wise and nitrogen wise and need to compost to cool them off.

>>668139
Sounds good to me. I own chickens so once a month I get a couple wheel barrows of straw bedding and chicken manure.
>>
>>668193
I really wanna have ducks myself, they crap a helluva lot and it'd be great for building compost with.

Have you seen the coops that have a mesh bottom and collect manure underneath? I'd love to build one with a "water airlock" Like pic related someday and keep some muscovy or runner ducks for meat and eggs.
>>
>>668206
Interesting with that airlock thing. Mine just stay on the pond all the time.
>>
>>667898
anyone else avocado?
>>
>>667690
Cucumbers trellis nicely. So do watermelon and pumpkin.
>>
>>668223
It just so happens that I have 5 Beit Alpha cucumber seedlings ready to plant and miles of trellis, so thanks for the suggestion anon!
>>
Stupid ass cold wave right now (it's -6°C/+21°F right now - before that the coldest this winter was -2°C/+28°F back in November) - had to finally bring the two huge Yucca elephantipes inside, hope they'll cope with the inside conditions (+20°C/+68°F, dry air, only 8.5h of daylight at 50°N, but at least it's a huge SW-facing window and lots of sunshine is in the forecast for the next days) - they've become too huge and heavy to carry them all the way to the cool but above-freezing garage.
Left one looks "funny" (bushy, broad growth) because we tried to plant it out back in 2008/09 but then got hit with an exceptional cold wave (-17°C/+1°F) which caused most of the above-ground parts to die, but it quickly grew back later

Winter should simply be outlawed desu
>>
>>668245
Put 'em on wheels anon.
>>
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>>668260
>helping the plants to become mobile
>>
>>668260
I normally use some sort of sack truck for 'em, but those two weigh about 200kg each right now and are around 2.50m tall (including pot which is too small for both too), last summer was hot and sunny so lots of growth, garage ceiling is only about 2m plus I live in a rather hilly area so getting it from the terrace to the garage means overcoming partially >20° inclines in the garden
Next spring I'll have to plant out at least the bigger one into a protected corner of the garden, I mean there's a chance of it dying from frost in following winters then, but if I don't do it it'll certainly die because of too small pot and/or no more space to move inside over winter (pots are much more sensitive to frost because it can attack from all sides compared to outplanted ones), if it keeps growing crazy like that
>>
>>668270
>>667336
>>663030
>>661770
this guy
>>
>>667901
how in the hell did you get your rosemary and lavender to sprout? Mine haven't done shit.
>>
Thinking about planting some potatoes within the next week or two because it's barely getting cold here in NC. Anyone ever plant potatoes in the winter?
>>
>>668301
hydrogen peroxide, it worked on the rosemary not the lavender
>>
>>668314
What does the hydrogen peroxide do, exactly? just kill the mold/fungus?
>>
>>668307
Mine are int he ground right now, but they are in storage where they grew. They have a layer of thick straw over top of them to help prevent freeze damage. When I need more potatoes, I go out and dig them up. When the weather warms up enough, the remaining potatoes will sprout new plants.

If you are planting potatoes earlier than normal, you shouldn't plant the kind you cut up into eyes pieces. These will more than likely just rot. If you use a whole potato of a small size "seed potato" and put a thick layer of straw over them (1 foot deep) it should be okay. Just pull the straw back to allow the plants to grow once it is warm enough.
>>
>>668347

I can do that, I think. I'll have to get some straw, but that shouldn't be too hard. Good to know since I really enjoy potatoes.
>>
>>668345
Many seeds need special treatments to trigger their germination. Some need acidic dips (simulates bird stomach) and some alkaline dips (simulates turtle stomach). These simulate stomach of the animals that eat them in the wild and will break down protective coatings. Others need abrasion (scarification) and cold for 1-2 months (stratification) [both simulate squirrel activity and winter] like many nut trees. Hydrogen peroxide is just another one to use. Some people use coke cola dips, potassium nitrate dips, charred wood leachate and.or heat treatment(simulates forest fires), citric acid dips, bleach, smoke solution, gibberellic acid-3, and so on. Yes, some like hydrogen peroxide do kill fungus that would otherwise destroy the seed and/or seedling.
>>
>>668351
What I normally do, is plant in the spring after the danger of frost. I will cut the eyes out of the potatoes in a way to make the cut out portion fairly small. I'll allow those eyes to dry out a bit for about 24 hours then I plant them via normal methods. That leaves a greater potion of potato left behind. I can turn a 50lbs bag of potatoes into 15 pounds of eyes and have 35lbs of potatoes to eat. Though, I have full food processing facilities so I'm able to preserve the potatoes in a variety of ways. I still have 2 bags of crinkle cut Yukon Gold french fries in my freezer from last spring.
>>
>>668356
What variety of lavender are you growing? Any other tips for getting it to grow? I'm currently going mad trying to get avandula angustifolia to germinate.
>>
>>668366
I'm not the anon that is growing lavender.

Use a heat mat and very well draining soil. Lavender seeds are germinated via light, so planting them too deep or keeping them in a dimly lit space will hinder their germination. They should take only 2 weeks to germinate, but you may find some take up to a month. You may first need to cold stratify the seeds by placing them in semi-damp soil in a bag in your fridge for a few weeks.

Lavender seedlings need full sun or lights of artificial light or they will get leggy fast. Don't let them get cold at night or they will dampen off and die.
>>
>>668377
stupid question: are heat mats a fire hazard if left running 24/7? I was going to move my seedlings to a modified bookshelf I have in a south facing window.
>>
>>667132
I've heard that corn, squash, and beans are a good combination. Depending on the squash/bean varieties those could give you some flowers, but the goal is mostly to produce food.
>>
Anyone else grow hot peppers? This will be my second year. Last year I grew jalapenos and Korean gochu, this year I'm adding cayennes. I'm pretty far south so its time to start seedlings.

Anyone have a preferred soil mixture? Last year I was a noob and went with a ghetto soil mix of half potting soil and half cactus mix (since I understand that peppers like sandy soil).

I fertilized with fish emulsion, as well as epsom salts applied as a spray. I was really happy with my yields considering I used relatively small containers, but the plants seemed to go through cycles of producing tons of fruit and experiencing a lot of leaf drop/yellowing, as if the plant was starving while trying to get the fruit to maturity. Any ideas?
>>
>>665609
>I have loads of sweet basil, sage and thyme
you shouldn't plant those in fertile soil.

they prefer wall-drained shit soil, the type of garbage you get when a house is demolished.
>>668366
the same as thyme.

it isn't the time of the year though, if they don't germinate you'll want to throw them in the fridge.
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>>668366
>pic related brand
lavender germ rate was unaffected by the peroxide it seemed. but.. i proably shouldve left them longer seeing as how it can take up to 4 wks
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>>668563
I have wild ones growing in my garden.
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>>668366
Same for me.
On my first try I put them in the fridge (~3°C) for about a month (already in soil, very slightly covered, just a few mm), then on a window in a room of 15-18°C with mostly ambient light - nothing
Added a few non-stratified seeds - nothing
(that was in October, I waited about 2 months before I ditched them)
Then in early January stratified only for 4-5 days, and now put them on top of the radiator of the SW window (constant ~30°C), some of them slightly buried, some on top of the soil - again nothing to date
In all cases kept things moist but not wet and wasn't too much of a scrooge with the number of seeds

Otherwise most of my stuff works so far, only strawberries don't want to do much either (tiny seedlings pop up but won't grow further for some reason)
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>>668628
To add, the shitty thing is that they won't grow by cuttings either (took some back in October, and only now one of them might start root development, something is starting to thicken on the "stem") - totally different from rosemary which grew roots in 10 days (and eventually 100% did), no hormone etc usage whatsoever in both cases. I know you have to be patient with some of them here - fig cuttings took 6 weeks for roots, cherry plum and privet 3-4 months
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>>668407
>are heat mats a fire hazard if left running 24/7?

Only if they don't have a thermostat, are well-insulated instead of being used correct, the breaker doesn't trip, there's a short, and/or etc etc etc. Basically, if you are using them properly and check them for wear and tear, they are no more dangerous than a toaster. Less so actually.
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>>668220

Yes
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>>669272
how long has it been growing ?
>>667898
these are my 2
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>>669378

Two to three months.
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What's a good plant for growing in my bathroom? It gets a bit of light but no direct sunlight through the windows. However the fan in there doesn't work for shit so there's plenty of moisture
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>>670133
Orchids, bromelias, vanilla, lots of these plants with aerial roots don't really like lots of light so they're perfect for your situation.
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>>670133
I often see Ficus benjamina and Ficus elastica cultivated in rather dark environments such as office rooms or at home a bit away from the window
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>>670159
>>670155
Thanks for the suggestions anons, I wouldn't mind giving vanilla a go
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>>670201
i dont think it smells like vanilla until it blooms, and that only for one day a year.
>>
I'm happy.
All my yuzu seeds have sprouted, they are doing well for just being indoors with a grow lamp.
>>
bonsai & dwarf fruit seeds came in today !! list is below
>
dwarf -> lemon, apple, pomegranate
japanese -> red maple, sakura, pine
>other ?
chinese crepe myrtle, persian silk tree
>>
Modified an IKEA bookshelf to have LED lights (only on the seed trays). Let's see how this works out... hopefully I won't burn my house down.

On that note, is it possible/safe to use heat mats without a thermostat?

Also, would it be overkill to use a heat mat as well as the LEDs?
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>>670133
One thing I've seen on the internets are little moss gardens. If your window is a small window in the shower you'd put the moss garden there and it'll get watered/misted each time you shower. Something like pic related
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>>670429
That's very cool anon, I'll have to look into what's involved
>>670237
Ah I didn't know that, I was hoping it would smell nice more often :(
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this thread is rly dead some days
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>>670718
>January
There's your reason. Most indoor stuff to place outside isn't started yet and most gardens are dormant, sure there's a few (sub)tropical and Southern hemisphere anons on here, but rather a small minority

I do have some stuff going on inside, like a few tomatoes (most are seedlings, one is a cutting from a cutting from last year's plants I'm trying to over winter), as well as a watermelon which is supposed to go outside in late April (pic related, it's still alive, I'm the 50°N guy if someone remembers), but things are going sloooow now thanks to the lack of sunlight
>>
First time growing tomatoes (and first time growing anything, really).

Is this blossom end rot? It's been like this since it was green.
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>>670837

Looks ok to me, not end rot.
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>>670837
no, that's completely normal
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>>670840
>>670841

Cool! Here's another picture.

It's the first time I've tried to grow anything and I've made a lot of mistakes, but man seeing these things grow from nothing into a huge thing putting out flowers left and right is a special kind of satisfaction.
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>>670843
yes it's magical ^^
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>>670429
I've seen a lot of good quality bonsai trees with pretty green moss surrounding their roots.
I've always wondered how hard it would be to maintain it.
I'd love to have a bonsai, but I'm in an area where it'd be impossible to find.
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>>668628
The best way to propagate strawberries is to transplant the runners, but this means getting it from an already established plant. I stole some runners from a friend and transplanted them last month. They're doing great so far.
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M8's look at the left side. Is it possible to grow a plant in a 4x4? I was thinking just drill a hole and put some dirt and some plant? Thoughts? Something that doesn't need light would be cool
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>>670426
Your lights need to be closer to the plants. As close as their heat output will allow.

>>670429
If it is in the shower, make sure it is up out of your splash zone. Shampoo, conditioner, etc can do some wicked things to plants.

>>670718
Welcome to the Homegrowmen threads!

>>670837
That's normal. It is the stage before getting cat-faced. Though, it didn't cat-face. A cat-face is fine too.

>>670898
Use a liner. Yes, you can. Select something that won't get so root bound in something so small. Also, everything needs light, even fungi. Perhaps lichen? Try, Cladonia cristatella, Cladonia verticillata, and Cladonia stellaris for lichens. Perhaps some clubmoss family stuff? "Lycopodium digitatum"
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>>670718
too many people growing plants inside m8
literally dead
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>>670957
Cladonia stellaris looks to be my favorite.
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>>670957
>>671103
How do I plant it? Just go find some outdoors, pluck it, and place it in the dirt?
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>>671104
Pretty much. You need to take into account what it is growing on and how much shade it is getting where it is growing. Replicating that would be best. They seem to grow on fairly poor rocky soil around here. Cliff sides, road cuts into hills, etc. I've enver tried to grow Cladonia stellaris before, just the others. Cladonia stellaris here only grew in one place in an old abandoned limestone quarry. Basically, take a section of whatever it is growing on.
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>>671062
spider plants ?
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Trenchanon yet again with another update:

Planted the basil, rosemary and lemongrass out in sandy loam and left a space for the sage, decided not to use the plastic mulch on this half of the trench in the end.

The other half will have the plastic mulch and has more compost and a much richer soil, Will be putting up a wood trellis and growing the cucumbers up it with a couple of the zucchini plants either side.

Hopefully everything goes to plan, we have a nice cool change in at the moment but it's really humid so I'm keeping an eye on the fresh transplants to make sure there's no mildew or bug issues.
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>>671225
I envy you. It won't be safe for me to put stuff outside until the middle of April. I haven't even ordered seed yet.

I have some saved seeds from last year, but we tried lots of varieties to see which would yield best here and I'm sure I'd have some odd crosses. Might try a few anyhow. I grew jalapeno, San Felipe, Hatch green, and cayenne peppers in the same row last year. There's probably some interesting hybrids in there.
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>>671233
You'll get there anon, I'm sure there are a few proven frost hardy plants you could try and put out early after some indoor seed starting.
I think I need a stronger light for my seed starting setup though, a good amount of my seedlings get a bit leggy but it's easy enough to fix with the temps we've been having so not all is lost.
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>>670889
Well I'm trying to grow "semi-wild" ones (i.e. that will have less fruit at once but will continue until October) instead of "normal" cultivars that dump all their fruit on you in May/June, I can and will buy some of the latter ones too as either grown or frosted plants, but semi-wild ones are hard to get this way
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>>670898
That place near the window on the same wall is usually the darkest spot in all of the room, unless you have more windows on other walls
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>>671309
"Everbearing" is the word to look for in descriptions for strawberries that do what you want.
>>
What do you guys do with indoor plants when it's been cloudy for a few days? I have lots of succulents and live in wisconsin and there hasnt been much sun the last week and I can tell they're hurting for it
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>>671319
Ah, we literally call them "monthly strawberries" in German
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>>671321
Artificial light. Get a cheap shop light or two.

http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId=20508606

That will get them through.
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Hey guys, here's my tomatos! Story: brother chopped up a tomato and I saw some seed germination, so I planted them. And now to my surprise they're not dead haha, but some of them are in a cluster around old tomato, so how long should I wait before moving them away from each other? Hard mode, I don't know when I put them in.
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>>671130
Killer plants.
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>>671355
u again rly
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>>671360
We've already lost at least 2 men
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>>671350
Oh shit I have one of those in my garage. Would one of those hydroponics lights that glows purple work better? I think I might have one of those too
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>>671375
Use the purple one. Your plants will grow better under it; it'll also make your grow room look trippy as fuck. Win win right there.
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>>671485
Okay thanks!
Is there ever a benefit to flourescent or CFL over the purple one?
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>>671515
A small benefit, but every bit helps. Here, this is an article that explains why purple light is best.

http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=2853
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>>671351
Them some kawaii little tomatoes anon, You gonna get hold of some of those 20 litre buckets and grow them upside down?

I've been meaning to do it since trussing them up sucks, it's worth looking into for sure.
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>>671646
Is that something I should consider haha? And any idea on my original question?
Pic is change from this morning to now
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>>671707
When I'm not autistic that is
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>>671707
>>671708
I'd wait til they have a couple of sets of true leaves and very gently separate them into pots and water them in with seaweed solution to prevent shock.

If you go the way of hanging buckets, the ideal way would be to try and harden those seedlings off in the container they're in now and when they're ready; plant them straight into the buckets.

How deep is the container in the pic? any less than about 4 inches and you'll probably have to transplant them twice, otherwise the roots are going to tangle into each other and they may not survive transplant.
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>>671711
It's like 3 inches.. And are there any benefits to hanging them?
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>>671719
The main benefit is that they're upside down so you don't need to stake them or truss them and they're off the ground and therefore a fair bit more pest resistant.

If you have tomato varieties that don't put out suckers and set up a timed drip system to water them, they're almost zero maintenance (still need to manage pests) up until fruiting, at which time you'll need to fertilise them appropriately.

I'll be trying it this year as it's tomato season now and I have some ready to plant out, will try to get pics as i get it done.
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>>671768
boy so little i know... how does one fertilize appropriately?
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>>671819
This PDF should answer your questions for the most part:
https://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/HG_2004-05.pdf

I would add that if you really want to get a serious yield out of only a few plants, it might be worth finding a fertiliser that encourages flowering and fruiting and apply it as soon as the plant starts to bloom. Organic fertilisers high in Potassium and Phosphorous are a good bet and there are specialised ones specilifcally for tomatoes if you don't feel like doing too much research, but up until flowering youre better off hitting the plant with high nitrogen fert and some seaweed emulsion.

I hope that helps anon, once you get those fellas transplanted and they survive, it's gonna be pretty easy to maintain them, just be careful and make sure you transplant them at dusk and carefully water them in with something to reduce shock.
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>>671247
We tend to get a snow around the beginning of April. I usually get started indoors with the idea of putting stuff out in the middle of April and start some peas and beans earlier. I'm in no rush, we're frost-free from early April until November most years.
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>>667440
I tried the 'cup-with-water' method, but the entire thing ended up rotting within just a couple days time.
Could I have done something wrong, or could the plant have been bad to begin with?
Can you take me through the process?
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>>671832
Any specific reason to transplant at dusk opposed to another time? Thanks for all of your help btw, just trying to absorb as much info as I possibly can
>>
http://shop.arborday.org/
legit site?
i remember ordering from here a while ago. i never got the tree, all they sent was a envelope saying "thanks for buying trees"
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>>671879
It's a precautionary measure to help your plants live through the transplant process. When uprooted and put into a bigger pot or in the ground, plants undergo a lot of stress, especially if the roots have been damaged and some plants can easily die in the first couple of days.

The reason for planting at dusk is to ensure that the plants get a chance to recover overnight instead of being scorched to death by the hot sun straight away if you were to plant in the morning. For this to work, you need to make sure there is no danger of frost at night as that can be every bit as much of a killer as full sun after a transplant so look up the "date of last frost" for your area to make sure that's not a factor.

Some plants will survive transplanting better than others, I've always had mixed results with cucumbers and some herbs as well as climbing beans, where some plants seem to not get stressed at all!

Where are you that you get snow in April anon? I'm in 'Straya and we're in the middle of summer, which is a good time for planting tomatoes as they love the heat and grow fast.
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This is a plan I have for a place we just bought. The green circles in the middle of the front yard are blackberry, blueberry, and raspberry plants
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>>668206
A fox will swim through the water.
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>>671956
implying fox knows that theres something under there
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>>666428
>being this much of a faggot
>>666734
>"i swear"
dear god, what a shit fest
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>>671961
Quality post m8
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>>671902
I'm in northern California, no snow but it's gotten mid 40's quite a few times. I've got these and some radishes set up in my back deck, which has a bunch of Windows that heat it up magnificently, to where it can be 80 outside, it would be like 100 inside

So when transplanting these little guys, should I have them maintain a certain distance apart from each other?
>>
Alright guys so I have no experience with gardening. If I just dig up all the grass and dirt and put in some fertilizer and mulch and rockdust would the soil be good

Does mulch only go on top of the soil I looked it up but I guess it's too dumb of a question I can't find the answer
>>
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I've got an acre of German extra hardy hardneck garlic
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fertilized with horse manure, which took a really long time to do
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Here's the seed garlic we picked up. With the way garlic grows, hopefully we should be harvesting 5-6x what you see here. Each head is broken down into cloves, which are then planted by hand in the proper orientation (unlike softneck garlick), which then grow into entirely new heads.
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Breaking the heads up by hand took a few days, and was super annoying. The total amount was around 25 five gallon buckets of cloves
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here's a picture of the root base which was established in the weeks prior to the ground freezing. Later on in the spring before harvest we will also take all the scapes which can be used for cooking, or for our purposes, sold to local restaurants. The actual garlic crop will be sold to a distributor.
>>
Thinking about growing a bonsai after succesfully growing many plants on my windowsill, still not sure what kind though.

Would anyone be kind enough to point me in a direction of where i should start reading up on it?
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>>672054
I'm interested in this as well.
Last year I quickly read a really good book on bonsai, and how to identify good quality plants. Roots need to be well kept and clean, and the branches must be positioned properly with no visible scarring (using wires if needed).

I doubt my area would have any kind of good quality trees for sale nearby, however.
>>
>>672054
>>672064
bonsai are to be grown primarily outdoors. I assumed they were house plants as well until I started doing research.
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>>672067
I was under the assumption that too much time outdoors is bad for them?
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>>672068
Scientifically speaking, there is no such thing as a "bonsai tree."

There are many types of bonsai trees.

Many different kinds of plants are used to create them. They are not a species.

Some are not trees at all, they are often shrubs, vines or even succulents.
>>
>>672004
Get a copy of the vegetable gardener's bible and read it. It'll help a lot. Short answers:

>grass
Use a square point shovel and take a couple of inches off the top of the soil. That'll get most of the roots.

>put in some fertilizer and mulch and rock dust
Get with someone local to find out what soil amendments you need for your particular soil. There is no such thing as too much compost, and it's great fertilizer. I also use a bit of the rotted blended fish in a bottle mid-season for plants that need it.

>mulch goes where?
On top. It's used to slow water loss and help prevent germination of weed seeds.

>what's a weed?
Any plant that's growing where you don't want it.

If you have hard ground, till the fuck out of it about a foot deep the first year and blend in lots of compost. Get rid of any rock bigger than a shooter marble ball while you're at it.
>>
My mom got another lemon tree after her previous one was kill

I tried researching how to care for them but got some conflicting info and shit that got way too deep for my limited understanding. She's just been giving it water and bringing its pot outside when it's warm and inside when it gets chilly.

What all can I do to help it out? I'd assume getting a light for it inside would be a good thing to start with (Especially since almost all the lights in our house are LED now), and some sort of food to give it regularly?
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>>672113
Did you try to over winter it cool and light? That might've killed it or at least caused defoliation, they don't like to be treated that way. Either put it cold and dark in winter (5°C-ish) or warm (at least 15°C) and light, in the latter case take care of parasites though
Problem with cold/light is that the leaves want to do photosynthesis and use up water, but the roots are too cold to deliver said water to the leaves, causing them to fall
>>
Is there anything about SPIN farming in the docs and libraries?

Anyone have familiar or have exp with SPIN farming? Ive started researching this this past week and will be considering doing this when i move this spring/summer
>>
>>672001
50 cm apart is a good way to go, if you're going to hang them you can have it so you can adjust them if needed.
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>>672020
nice stuff, a ton of work though
>>
>>672013
>>672017
>>672018
>>672020
Nice work anon, you're a real trouper for getting all that hard work done.

Any advice you can give me for propagating garlic? I've used store bought cloves and putting them in the freezer for a week and then burying them in well drained soil but have had zero success so far.

It's summer here atm if that matters, but I was growing these inside under a growlux light.
>>
>>661535
The link for the potato and tuber bank doesn't work anymore.
>>
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Do these things work?
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>>667901
How long did the lemon seeds take to sprout? Did you take off the outer shell first?
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>>668220
Yerp, Here are my Avocado and Mango trees.
Avos are Hass and the Mango are Calypso, Kensington and R2E2.
>>
>>672563
Noice anon, what latitude are you at laddy? Also, are you gonna graft any of those up?
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>>672567
33° S, 151° E roughly, Yup, Have a 2 meter tall one atm that I'll graft. Its a long time to wait for fruit if i dont.
>>
>>672518
are u asking if it has a job?
>>
Anybody here have cherry trees? We're thinking about planting a couple. One sweet for nibbling/preserves and one tart for baking/preserves. Got any advice other than trusting the guy at the place that makes its money selling trees? (Trees and supplies for them are literally all they sell.)
>>
>>672518
>>672578
In my experience, those fish are a little too beta to succeed in the workplace.
>>
>>672578
i think hes trying to ask if you dont have to maintain it.
since theres a water filter and plants dont need anything
>>
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Trenchanon with another update:

Made a makeshift trellis and planted out the cukes and zukes, as well as a couple of kale seedlings I've semi buried in the ground to harden them off. The zucchinis showed a bit of stress today but once they got a dose of afternoon shade they perked back up quickly and are looking strong, The cucumbers surprisingly are showing no signs of stress too which is nice.

Tried planting one of the sage seedlings but it's dying at a rapid rate and I'm not sure I'll be able to plant sage out at all so maybe I might plant in some leaf lettuce instead.
>>
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Who here grows mushrooms?

Not magic mushrooms, but mushroom for food and fun?
>>
>>666924
You can make ink with pokeberry.
The berries are poisonous.
>>
>>667898
Nice lamp, you make that yourself?
>>
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German guy here. I planted herb seeds two to three months ago, trying it out for the first time ever.
People told me shit won't grow because it's fall and winter is coming.
So along the proccess of me watering them, I read some more stuff about it.
Turns out they don't get enough light during this time of the year, they think they grow in some kind of bush so they don't grow any bigger.
hey've been stagnating like this for about a month now.
Well in one or two months, spring is coming and I read that you should plant seeds then.

Now my question: Should I empty out all the pots, throw the soil away and make new ones with new seeds or will the little plants start growing once they survived the winter and the sun is showing itself more often?

Thanks for reading.
>>
>>671225
Looks nice anon, well done.
>>
>>672651
I would let them in the pots, they don't seem too yellowish. Do you turn them regularly to prevent them growing side-way?
I would worry more about the heater nearby, though they seem to deal fine with it
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>>672018
I will never complain about peeling 8 cloves of garlic for my shrimps ever again
>>
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>>672668
>they don't seem too yellowish
They're not yellow at all. The basil with the chili seem to be dying though.

>I would worry more about the heater nearby, though they seem to deal fine with it
They really do
>>
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This is basil with its own pot
>>
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This is chili with basil mixed in
>>
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I feel like buying some of this off-patent GM soy for the keks of planting it in my garden.

http://www.dynagroseed.com/sites/default/files/S55RS13.pdf

Heard they grow well.

AND

Monsanto can't do shit to me
>>
>>672611
Of course.
>>
>>672518
Sorta, but not really well.
>>
>>672696
>I feel like buying some of this off-patent GM soy for the keks of planting it in my garden.

Shill somewhere else.
>>
File: 1452710937197.gif (1 MB, 245x245) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
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>>672711
>hurr durr shill
>>
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I ordered some lacinato kale seeds a few days ago, it'll be my first time trying to grow anything
>>
>>672675
>>672677
>>672678
Nice. I may be wrong, but on the last photo it seems to me the soil is a little too wet for the basil, hence those leaves. What do you think?
>>
>>672731
I water all of them at the same times with the same amount of water. The drainage is working very good so I figured why not
>>
>>672651
Same cunt (50°N), and only having ENE-facing window for most stuff (plus a grow light for the more light-demanding stuff like basil and thyme) and also started a lot in September-November, and it depends a lot on species
Kiwi barely grows at all, rosemary cuttings are also slow but that's to be expected. Figs are doing relatively well, and lemon balm (seeded mid-September but only really started growing in November when it was already rather dark) grows like a weed, pic related
>>
>>672743
>Kiwi
Tell me more
>>
>>672737
Yeah, no big deal. I was saying that because of those leaves, chalk on the pot and moisture/fungus on the soil (though I'm not sure because of the picture focus)

>>672743
Nice. What is the little tree on the right?
Also, I see you use aluminium foil, is it good? Is it better wrinkled or plain?
>>
>>672747
Of course I'm not talking about a certain dinosaur or islander, but https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Actinidia_deliciosa
Treating them just like pretty much every seed from a fruit
>Get seeds out
>Wash away the pulp well
>Soak in water for a couple hours
>Plant in
They did sprout well (around early November), but not much growth happening since then, plus half of them have died by now
Don't know if it's the lack of light or something else, or if they need really extreme pHs or whatever (soil I use should be around neutral-ish, also not oversalted or anything)
>>
>>672751
Kiwis don't grow in Europe, do they? What did you use as seed? One of those in the fruit?
Are you planning on putting them outside once they have reached a certain size?
>>
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>>672563
age of the avocados? im about 1 1/2 months into mine. 2 have split and rooted no top yet, the other 3 havent quite split not sure why? they are hass aswell one is quite large though
>>
>>672748
Those things on the right are cherry plum cuttings (took f'kin 3 months to develop roots in a water glass before I transferred them to soil)
The alu foil is to give my hopelessly etoiliated oregano seedlings a bit extra light, pic related (I've wrapped it around about 2 weeks ago, there's slight improvement showing IMO)
>>672755
Here they should do (zone 8a), of course I'm not expecting fruit anytime soon or even at all, because it needs a male and female plant and there's no way to tell them apart until a few years in, so I'd have to be extremely lucky to get a "couple" if I plant out 2 of them
Yeah of course they're eventually going into the garden as vines
Yeah I got them out of a green fruit (deliciosa species), apparently there's also another yellow-fruit one I could've used (chinensis)
>>
>>672757
Forgot pic
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>>672758
Also I just watered it a few seconds before the pic because it got a little dry (last watered like a week ago), it's not always that wet of course
>>
>>672757
I wouldn't have had the patience to wait 3 months, well done! What's the benefice to put it in water, rather than straight in soil with rooting hormone?
The oregano soil look very clay-like, I didn't know oregano could grow in these
>>
>>672758
Looks like oregano
>>
>>672763
>What's the benefice to put it in water
Well, I just wanted to see how they develop I guess, also not as annoying as to keep things constantly moist with soil without seeing any results. By using water I can see if things develop or are already fucked (I couldn't get either Lantana camara nor laurel to grow roots in water glass, after a few months they simply dried up from the top without showing any sign of root development - same seems to happen with my lavender cuttings - fig worked after 6 weeks though, and rosemary and tomato just need ~10 days, privet also took 3-4 months though)
>The oregano soil look very clay-like
Yeah that's just the way our local soil is - I did mix up a bit with sand though for loosening

>>672766
I know, that pic was about to go with the first part here >>672757
I already showed my kiwi failures there >>672751
>>
>>672822
So you change water daily, or you let it be? I'd be afraid of rotting... Anyway thanks for your reply, I hope you'll post more pictures in a new thread (this one reached bump limit)
>>
>>672852
I usually change the water every couple days to a week
>>
Its my first time growing mushrooms at home. Luckly non of my jars are contaminated but I am worried about the morels. Like you see in the picture they are very moist unlike my other jars and im think its due to their respiration but with moister leads to contamination. Should I worry at all?

Also what would be a good substrate to fruit these suckers in. Something not too pricey like wood-chips or straw is what im guessing?
>>
This thread is no longer bumping!

NEW THREAD:
>>672922
>>672922
>>672922
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>>672756
I cant remember how long the two larger ones have been growing, A few months now I think. I started them all in water and planted them when they split and or started shooting roots. Some of them didn't produce any roots but i could see the embryo inside, so I just planted them and they ended up shooting.
>>
>>672132
Last winter she planted it outside once it got about 2 feet tall and it was promptly killed by the next time there was frost
I'll get it a light though and stop taking it out in the cold and opt to leave it indoors under the lamp
>>
>>673483
>Frost
Well that makes sense, they're not frost-hardy at all, MAYBE can survive a very short dip below 0°C but that's it - how cold does it get where you live? You can only plant them out in zone 9b, better 10a
I don't have my lemons under a lamp, but just on a south-facing window since mid-October, and we get very little light in winter here at 50°N (down to 8 hours in mid-December, of which on average maybe 2 are sunshine) but they seem to do fine so far
>>
>>673525
8B, and I was thinking a light since our house actually doesn't have any south-facing windows
>>
>>673529
Another option would be to place them in a cool but rather dark and frost-free room, like a garage, that way you don't have to worry about parasites
>>
>>673534
That does sound like a really good idea, but I'm worried about leaving it in the dark since it's a very small sapling (Probably 4-5 inches tall with 4 leaves)
We do have no experience with keeping plants alive though
>>
>>673676
Hah yeah, mine are also relatively small at this point (sprouted back in July, stem height ~16cm), that's why I decided on a warm over wintering too in the first year at least
>>
>>673716
>>673676
To add, I did discover what I think were fungus gnat larvae in one of the pots some weeks ago, but they're (hopefully) gone now since I flushed them out a couple times and added a drop of Bti emulsion to my plant water and put up yellow stickers and the plants show no damage
(For a picture, they're in the bottom left of my collection here >>672935)
>>
>>673716
>>673718
Alright, thanks
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