[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y ] [Search | Home]
4Archive logo
Hammock Camping
If images are not shown try to refresh the page. If you like this website, please disable any AdBlock software!

You are currently reading a thread in /out/ - Outdoors

Thread replies: 280
Thread images: 50
File: hammockbasecamp.jpg (408 KB, 1238x928) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
hammockbasecamp.jpg
408 KB, 1238x928
So /out/, this is my first time on this board, coming from /k/. I'm getting a hammock for my bug out bag, I already have a tarp as well. What should I do for sleeping pads? I have a closed cell pad, but I don't know where to put it (In the hammock or on the ground). Also, is it worth getting a "comfort" sleeping pad or not?
>Hammock Camping General
>>
>>646556
> don' know where to put it

Well of course you put the closed cell pad on the ground if you are in the hammock! Anything else would be counter-intuitive.
>>
>>646561
I'm new to hammock camping
>>
>>646556
> I don't know where to put it (In the hammock or on the ground)
How do you survive this complex world?
>>
Mummy pads work great in hammocks. Square ones can be more of a pain.
>>
>>646556
I...I literally can't even. Is this a troll?

If you're in a hammock, you're not touching the ground, so a mattress pad on the ground would not do anything. Having insulation between the underside of your hammock and the ground is important though, either with a pad inside the hammock or an underquilt outside.

They're not really necessary if it's warm out, though.
>>
>>646556
Op welcome! Don't listen to those bitter oldfags, they're just messin' with ya!

The pad goes on the ground, hang your hammock so it is on the ground, on the pad.

This reduces wind chill and mqkes it easier to get in and out of.

If possible, hang your tarp over your gearand away from your hammock, this will draw wild animals away from you and keep your gear dry!

Welcome to /out/!
>>
File: 1441239154988.png (344 KB, 691x510) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1441239154988.png
344 KB, 691x510
>>646581
We helped someone today anon
>>
Ok let's start over since every other post is a troll.

The pad goes in your hammock, and you'll lay on top of it. By comfort pad do you mean an inflatable? Of so, don't get one, inflatable pads I find don't work well in hammocks, you tend to roll off them.

Look into an underquilt. They're the best insulation in my opinion. Cheapest you'll find is the snugpak underblanket. It's $52 on amazon and will take you to freezing temp. I have one. It's good shit for $52.

Get a double hammock. They're not called double because they're made for 2 people, they're called that because they're a little bigger than a single hammock. They have more room to lay in.

I can't sleep in my hammock without a small pillow. My cousins hammock camp with me and never use a pillow. Personal preference .
>>
File: hammock-basics-new.gif (103 KB, 612x792) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
hammock-basics-new.gif
103 KB, 612x792
>>646590
>>
File: hammock-basics.jpg (119 KB, 612x792) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
hammock-basics.jpg
119 KB, 612x792
>>646591
>>
>>646590
>>646591
> hammock off the ground

Op, this guy is flatout fucking with you!

Keep the pad and hammock on the ground, you won't need an underquilt, that is like '90's tech!

Anybody that eno's with his cousins is a chicken fucker!

Btw, since you're new it's called "enoing", glad you're here!
>>
>>646581
>>646595
>>>/b/ with your trolling asses. Anon came to learn, not to die. Although, on 4chan, you'll learn or die trying.
>>
>>646616
D-do you want to go enoing with me, anon?
>>
>>646591
>>646592
kek at these pleb meme infographs
>>
>>646590
Thanks for not being a fucking dickwad like the rest of you faggots. I'll ask /k/ next time.
>>
>>646579
I've seriously read stuff before about people putting closed cell on the ground and an inflatable in the hammock. That's why I'm asking.
>>
>>646581
Jesus, dude. I said I'm new, not that I have an extra 21st chromosome. Obviously you cover your gear with your tarp and sleep under your hammock.
>>
>>646624
> learns something
> is grateful and ungrateful at the same time

Are you a girl? Do you put your pad on the outside of your panties? Because 9/10 girls know not to do that and you just learned where to put your pad and you could be that special 10/10 girl!
>>
>>646630
What's wrong with being grateful to the guy that actually helped me and ungrateful to trolls. I fail to see the problem.
>>
>>646662
D-do you want to go enoing with me, anon?
>>
>>646662
As with anything test your shit in the backyard before you really need to rely on it. Figure it out trial and error.

Personally I use a double hammock, toss the classic blue foam pad into it and my sleeping bag on top. Use a tarp if there's a chance of snow/rain.

Always tie a stiff, no slack rope above you so you can hook shit to it and have easy access to said shit.

Cheers
>>
>>646556
Hey, these guys are fucking with you pretty bad. The point of a pad is to keep insulation between you and the ground. Ideally your hammock will be suspended in air, and will not touch the ground. If you are planning on using a hammock and not a tent, you do not need a sleeping pad.
>>
>>646767

You need insulation under you in a hammock for any temps below about 65 degrees. You'll get what we call CBS, cold butt syndrome. Even good sleeping bag lose most insulation under your butt once in a hammock.

A pad is the cheapest way to fix this. I personally use an underquilt, since I find it more comfortable, but a pad is like $10, and works.
>>
>>646735
That "stiff no slack rope" is what we call a ridgeline. Not everyone uses one but they're very common, and very useful. The best use of them is to keep your hammock consistent every time you hang it. So no matter the distance between trees you hang, you keep a consistent sag. This guy is roghr, they're awesome to hang stuff on. They make things called ridgeline organizers that are pretty nice, gives you a few pockets to store your stuff.

The rule of thumb is to measure the length of your hammock, and then take 83% of that length, and that should be the length of the ridgeline you use.

The ridgeline should be attached to the ends of your hammock like in this pic >>646592
>>
>>646629

>sleep under your hammock
>under

wat
>>
>>646824
What an idiot. The proper set up is ground tarp, tent, tent floor protective cover, neo air, hammock, underquilt, sleeping bag, overquilt, hammock tarp and finally a spring loaded ez canopy to tie it all together
>>
>>646564
You are a fucking retard. That's just common sense.
Go back to /k/
>>
Hi sc/out/s!

I'm totally new to going /out/ can you help me understand how to do it? I mean, how do you get /out/? Do you smash out a window and jump through it or do you drive your car right through the garage door?

Is that what the axes are for, for chipping thru the walls of your house?

Any help would be much appreciated I'm new to /out/.
>>
>>646824
That is why they call it an underquilt. You wrap yourself in it while sleeping under your hammock.
>>
what a bunch of dicks.

there is a ton of room outside, not sure why these shitlords want to try and discourage you from getting /out/ or is the new meme to shitpost on all of 4chin and i just missed it.

ive camped in a hammock before. i used a shitty coleman sleeping bag inside of my shitty walmart hammock with a shitty walmart tarp over the top. it got down to about 65 at the coldest and i recall bugs being annoying but it wasnt that big of a deal.

hang your gear up with a rope, get a hammock with a bug net , a tarp over the top, and a good sleeping bag is what my limited (but happily offered) experience tells me.
>>
I came to find /hammock/ general but instead I found this.
>>
>>647298
I don't use a bug net, but I'm not in a crazy bug infested area, like some places in the southeast usa are. Bugs are no joke there. I'm in northern PA/southern tier NY state. I just use some deep woods Off before bed around my face. It's like 98% DEET so it doesn't take much, but it's smells bad and is greasy. An awesome anon bought me a gift in the secret Santa thread, and it's a coughlans bug net, so I'm going to rig that up next spring when the bugs come back.
>>
>>647249
Generally you should use a Mora to break thru your walls. Save the pieces of wood for use in your biolite so you can can fully charge your homemade dragon dildo piston or your adopted shelter dog pitbull will rape you instead. If you use a car to do that job you are nothing but a gearfag who doesn't care about global warming
>>
I just saw a store in my area has ENO DoubleNests and Atlas Straps on sale.

FYI the sale price of the hammock is about $7 AUD cheaper than one would cost me from REI.
But this would be in my hands rather than maybe $45 on top for shipping and a couple of weeks waiting, so it's a price worth considering.

What do you guys think of the DoubleNest? Worth picking up?

I was thinking of getting a Warbonnet Blackbird so this is $90 AUD that should maybe go to that.
>>
>>648026
The blackbird is a much better hammock.

That said, nothing wrong with an ENO Doublenest. They're a decent mass produced hammock. They come with nice carabiners to hang them with, and a decent compression sack attached. They're a little heavy compared to cottage made hammocks, but they're still relatively light.

Warbonnet is a cottage company. They make a lot of stuff to order, so may be several weeks before you can receive a warbonnet product.
>>
>>648152
Cheers for your input. Umm. Maybe I'll just get the ENO now and see how I go with that. I could really use one sooner rather than later.
>>
>>648168

Wildhorn Outfitters sells on Amazon. For $60 you can get an 11 foot hammock with a nice cinch buckle suspension system. I really wish I'd have gone this route.

I have a Yukon Double and ENO atlas straps. They work fine together, but the Wildhorn deal is pretty good.

Hammock and straps for the price of just an ENO Doublenest. The wildhorn is a bit longer than the ENO as well which is nice. Comes in a few different colors, including camo at no extra charge, usually camo costs more.
>>
Tried out my new Snugpak Hammock cacoon yesterday. Trying it out overnight tomorrow. Supposed to be 1-3 inches of snow tomorrow night, so I'll report back how it does for me.
>>
>>
>>648194
How critical do you think it is to get the right size atlas straps? Lets pretend they cost the same amount of money. Do you think I'd regret not getting one or the other?
Amazon still means over a week of wait for me.
>>
>>648220
The atlas straps come in one size I believe, they allow a wide range of adjustment.

They may come in an XL size.... but I've never used (or needed them).
>>
>>648201
anyone else know if snugpak is any good? They seem priced pretty low so it's tempting.
>>
>>646626
I think the confusion, if I may... is that you think they mean they're putting a second pad on the ground when they sleep in a hammock, when what they actually meant is that they use a closed cell pad when they sleep on the ground and an inflatable when they sleep in a hammock.

English is not a fun language, that's why no one ever learns it.

For what it's worth, an underquilt and no pad is the way to go, unless you can afford or can sew a cocoon. Cocoons are like being wrapped in warmth.
>>
>>650273
Snugpak Hammock cacoon is like $60. I got mine on sale for $40.

>>650256
I have both the Snugpak Hammock Cacoon and Snugpak underblanket. The underblanket is as good as it gets for an entry level underquilt. It's $53 on Amazon, anything even close to it is twice the price at least. It covers me head to toe (I'm 6'1") and I've taken it to about 35 degrees without issue. The cacoon is a mixed bag. It's warm, but super bulky.

I used the underblanket and cacoon together a few nights ago, got to 25 degrees with 2omph winds. I also used a top quilt and was super warm, it was really nice.... but the cacoon is just too big for backpacking unless you're not hiking far.
>>
>>650329
I don't know my my phone autocorrects cocoon to cacoon
>>
>>650329
I havent ever seen someone buy that snugpak cocoon before. What I did was deseam the foot box and cut a twelve inch slit in the hood of my 5F sleeping bag, resew the foot box around the foot of my parachute hammock and reinforce the slit with webbing, and just run the head of the hammock through the hood loosely. Total cost was under $60. I also removed most of the rope and replaced the rings with biners. I also made my own straps for about $5.

And my friends used to make fun of me because I can sew. MYOG FTW!
>>
>>650273
Nope. I use a ground cover tarp under my hammock to protect my investment from rocks and abrasions and I use a ground quilt on top of that to insulate the ground from my hammock.

We all do it a bit differently so don't generalize
>>
>>650347
Didn't mean to offend. I throw down my bivvy footprint under my hammock as well (I always carry both, in case no trees), but I don't see why a pad on the ground would be necessary.
>>
>>650329
do you thing a snugpak underquilt and closed cell foam pad with with a 0 degree sleeping bag could take you to 20 degrees if you layered inside the bag?
>>
>>650358
Seems like you could lose the pad. It'll probably just result in increased perspiration on your underside.
>>
>>650358
With a pad I'd imagine 20 degrees would be very possible. Some people go that low with just a decent pad and no underblanket at all.
>>
What under quilt do you guys use?

If money was no object: what under quilt would you use?

Also, same two questions but with top quilts.
>>
>>650351
The pads helps insulate you from the ground and the air. The key is to have enough layers so that your hammock is slightly resting on the uppermost top layer of your ground cloth/pad pile. It's a bit tricky and some would say overkill but quite comfy
>>
What kind of sleeping bag do you guys use if you have your underquilt? Do some of you sleep with just the underquilt?
>>
>>650677
So you're saying that the bottom of the hammock is laying low enough that it touches the pad on the ground? My cocoon seems like a better solution than that, unless I'm just still not understanding you. Have pics?
>>
>>650766
I use a sleeping bag with my underquilt, but I just lay the bag on top of me opened up. No need to climb inside it, which isnt easy in a hammock.
>>
>>650645
I use a Snugpak underblanket currently.

If money was no object I'd have an Enlightened Equipment Revolt 20 degree 950 down quilt.
>>
>>650769
Sure a cooccoon or tent is a better solution but some of us just love hammocks just cuz
>>
>>651169
That anon isn't say he doesn't like hammocks, he's saying the way it's described seems odd. A cocoon just goes around a hammock.

>>650677
This is absurd. Why would you lay a hammock so low it touches the ground? It makes so sense. Hanging a proper underquilt or using a pad inside the hammock is infinitely easier than trying hang a hammock so it just barely touches some shit you laid on a the ground. Please, no one else try this, it is wrong and idiotic.
>>
Guys, I bought cheap straps back when I bought my hammock and now I want to upgrade. Seems like there's a lot of options on the market right now, anyone have an opinion on pic related, or should I just get ENO atlas straps/ something else?
>>
>>651246
Also looking for biners while I'm at it.
>>
>>651246
Stop taking advice from here and you won't have to replace your shitty equipment so often
>>
Wouldn't a space blanket be just as good as an expensive quilt? I'm not entirely sure of the physics, but those things are supposed to reflect heat back towards you, so it should work in theory.
>>
>>646556
Dude, why would you put it on the ground lol.

Most people put either a pad or some kind of thick underquilt underneath them in the hammock while they sleep. Some hammocks have a pouch underneath to place a quilt in.

>>646829
>>646824
Wait. No.

Mattress, pillow, blanket, mattress, Spongebob, mattress? Or was it... mattress, mattress, THEN spongebob, then pillow, then blanket?
>>
>>651246
I made mine. But I also have access to a sewing machine.
>>
>>651300
If you mean the slightly insulated high end ones, not really. If you mean the dollar ones, lol no.
>>
>>651353
Can I make a hammock out of a dollar store space blanket? Or maybe two for double strength? I'm not seeing the downside if the regular ones break on first use anyway
>>
>>651402
Doubt it would work unless you're a stuffed toy animal.

You could probably make one out of cheap polytarp though.
>>
I didn't think /out was dumber than /b
+1 OP
>>
Do you know what hammock you're planning on buying?
>>
>>652725
I used to run the same hammock as you, Z dog, but I now have an Eno Reactor. It's brilliant.I'd recommend it to OP.
>>
>>652725
You guys sure go to alot of trouble and expense to avoid using a tent
>>
>>651246

Awful. Get whoopie slings and tree huggers, done.

As for carabiners, IMO Nano23s are the best for camping applications. Climbing rated but only weigh 23g.
>>
>>653052
Get neutrinos instead
>>
>>653052
I like the Atlas straps, they're a bit heavy for what they are, but unless you're an unltralighter, they aren't exactly huge. They're about the most simple way to hang.

Agree whoopies are better, but for a beginner, the Atlas straps will serve you just fine.

>>653057
I have the neutrinos for my hammock. They're awesome. Pretty crazy how light they are.
>>
File: 20151219_090110.jpg (2 MB, 3264x1836) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
20151219_090110.jpg
2 MB, 3264x1836
25 degree hang last week.
>>
File: 20151219_090102.jpg (3 MB, 3264x1836) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
20151219_090102.jpg
3 MB, 3264x1836
>>653141
>>
>>652818
Yup. And it's all worth it.

Never having to sleep on hard, cold ground. Being able to camp on sloped areas. Far less weight because there's no stakes or poles to carry. Combo poncho/tarp saves me from carrying a rain fly. No ground clearing work, improves LNT.

A tent would be better in a campground or desert/burnout, but if there's trees, I'd rather swing in the breeze.
>>
>>653392
This guy gits it.
>>
>>653143
I'm so jelly, it's been raining on and off for several weeks around here and I'm just itching to do an overnight. Hope it'll drop into freezing at least so it comes down as snow.
>>
File: 20151219_090118.jpg (2 MB, 3264x1836) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
20151219_090118.jpg
2 MB, 3264x1836
>>653412
20mph wind gusts that night. Got some rain before it hit freezing. Then the rain stopped and didn't get any snow at all.

Was pretty loud that night with the wind gusting so bad, it was howling.

It's been weirdly warm here lately. Looking forward to some snow hammock camping too.
>>
>>653057

Why? They're a wire gated carabiner just like the Camp 23s, but weigh a third more for no benefit.

They have 4kN extra strength on the main axis but that's hardly a concern for this application.
>>
The cheapest underquilts I can find are $200+. Is this a decent price range, or is this just some ripoff bullshit?
>>
File: suddenly.gif (2 MB, 355x275) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
suddenly.gif
2 MB, 355x275
I've been watching:

https://www.youtube.com/user/shugemery/videos

Great guy and overall one of the better hammock campers on the youtubes...but...

I'm looking on Amazon and I really don't know what to get. Since I want to go hammock(ing) this winter I'll need:

a good hammock
an under quilt for
good tarp

Oh, yeah I'm terrible with knots so the suspension system and ridge line will need to need to accommodate that.

The weather should be anywhere from 30s to 10s.
>>
>>653456
Stronger and cheaper
>>
>>653814
Most are that price or higher. They're generally made with down, and super light, really compressable.

You do have cheaper options.

$52 on amazon gets you a Snugpak underblanket. It's full length and is good to about 32 degrees. I have one, and for the price, there's nothing else that comes close. Any other option is at least twice the price. Only available in green.

For $100 you can get a Jarbidge quilt from Arrowhead Equipment. They're a 3/4 length quilt so you use a pad under your feet. Should be good to 25 degrees. They ate custom made to order, comes in a few colors. My brother has one, it's really nice.

ENO makes the Ember 2, which isn't reviewed well, for $100. They also make one called the vulcan for about $175 (sometimes $135 on sale). It's reviewed better, but considered inferior for the price. It's a bit bulky and not as warm as others in the price range.

$160 gets you a New river quilt from arrowhead equipment. It's just like the Jarbidge, but it's full length.

Enlightened equipment makes one called the prospect. Available in a few colors and temp ranges, and lengths. It's $140 for short 50 deg quilt, and $180 for a long 20 degree quilt.
>>
>>654113

Easiest suspension are the ENO Atlas straps. Abut $25.

Wildhorn Outfitters sells a hammock on amazon for like $50, including straps with whoopies. It's a good deal.

Ridgeline isn't necessary, just nice to have. I don't use one.

See here for underquilt options >>654510

If you want to go really cold, a foam sleeping pad in the hammock with a underquilt hung below will take you pretty low.
>>
>>654517
do I need an underquilt if I just use my 20 degree bag in my hammock
>>
>>654113
Don't worry about knots and stuff its all real easy just get out there. Winter camping is de best
>>
>>654543
Yes. And no.

You don't need an expensive underquilt if you use a sleeping pad in the hammock.

Your weight compresses the insulation below you, making it less effective at keeping you warm. Basically means your 20 degree bag becomes about a 50 degree bag in a hammock.

My cousin doesn't use an underquilt. Hes used just a 15 degree bag in 25 degree weather, but he's the exception. Some people sleep crazy hot. If you sleep normal, you'll want an underquilt, or a sleeping pad.

Under insulation is important in a hammock.
>>
>>654517
>Wildhorn Outfitters straps
These look pretty good, different from whoopie slings, they use a cinch buckle on the strap itself to adjust length. They permanently attach to the hammock and the carabiner is used to loop the strap around the tree. I think I'll grab these unless someone has something horrible to say about them.

I'm >>651246 and was looking for the easiest setup, weight is somewhat negligible as I'm sure whoopie slings are the lightest but will require some knot/toggle tying at setup.
>>
>>654726
>sleeping pad
Like a thermarest? Any regular camping pad? What about milsurp ones?
>>
>>654793
Ok... I remember now they are cinch buckles... for some reason I thought they had whoopies. I knew it was a nicer setup than just straps and biners.

I'd give them a try... they look pretty nice. For $50 you can get the straps and a hammock. Good deal.
>>
>>654899
A closed cell foam pad works best. Inflatable pads aren't as nice in a hammock in my opinion. They are great on the ground. But in a hammock when they're inflated, you kinda roll off them.

A thermarest ridgerest, or z-lite pad works well. Even something as simple as a $10 camping mat from walmart adds quite a bit of warmth.

I like the Thermarest z-lite since it packs small, is light, works well, and doubles as a site pad really well. They're also not very expensive. I use an underquilt, but am thinking of getting a z-lite to add when it gets really cold.
>>
>>654928
thanks i'm going to order one of those z lites right now, do you have and recommendations for a budget rainfly? i've been working with a blue tarp but i don't like it
>>
>>654987
Another guy here, I really like my yukon outfitters rainfly and they're pretty cheap right now.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EUHZ74I/sr=1-2/qid=1437240006
>>
>>654987
If you're going to buy a sleeping pad (not just reuse something you already have) why not just buy a snugpak underblanket? I've tried to used sleeping pads in hammock before and always just rolled off them, but I'm very fidgety and reposition myself often in the night so I guess your mileage may vary. I definitely prefer the underblanet myself.
>>
>>655045
I have a blanket already, mostly it's because I don't always get the chance to use my hammock. Sometimes you just have to roll with the ground.
>>
>>655034
>>654987

A few weeks ago I ordered a Yukon rainfly from Woot, was on sale for $16.... crazy price for such a nice tarp. Look for them on sale. Woot has yukon outfitters sales like once a month.

Amazon has a tarp called a base tube tarp 1.0 for like $30. I have one of those also. Much bigger than the yukon, and has zips on the side to make into a simple tent if need be.... it's also heavier and bulkier than the yukon. Pic related here.....>>653143


The Kelty Noah's tarp is really nice, they aren't terribly expensive.
>>
>>655078
lemme buy one of yours for $20
>>
File: 1444753292517.png (141 KB, 2212x2212) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1444753292517.png
141 KB, 2212x2212
Just a heads up for those looking into hammock camping.

Vermont Army Navy is still having a holiday sale, 15% off stuff.

They carry snugpak products. You can get a Snugpak Underblanket for $42 which is absolutely insane for an underquilt. You can also get the Snugpak Hammock Quilt, which is a top quilt, for $38.... with free shipping.

That's $80 for your top and bottom insulation in a hammock. The absolute cheapest other alternatives to this would cost over $200 and not be as good. For comparable stuff you'd spend probably $250 and have to pay for shipping.

Anyone who hammocks should check this deal out.
>>
>>655045
Jesus Christ you are retarded. Did you read the directions? The sleeping pad goes on the ground under the hammock. It keeps you warmer and you don't roll off that way.
>>
>>656502
Stop, the joke wasn't funny 2 weeks ago when you tried to force it then.
>>
>>656553
>tentfag detected
>>
File: 20151218_193437.jpg (2 MB, 3264x1836) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
20151218_193437.jpg
2 MB, 3264x1836
>>656581
Nope, I hammock.
>>
File: stanley_cups.png (21 KB, 460x360) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
stanley_cups.png
21 KB, 460x360
>>656613
nice cooker m8!
>>
>>656623
And it's boiling water to cook a mountain house meal I was gifted in the secret Santa thread

I will become the alpha goose.
>>
>>656613
What a dork. If you put your pad under your hammock you don't need to light it on fire to keep warm
>>
Got a cheap hammock recently and I am pretty impressed by it. ~1 lb of shit contained in a small stuff sack and suddenly I have a chair/bed anywhere I want in the woods. Sets up / takes down super quick. Not really sold on using it as a shelter since I am not sure how quality of sleep I could really get in it plus in case of gear failure you really fucked if all you have is the hammock. But I am certainly bringing it with me anytime I head out, really great piece of kit.
>>
>>656681
>chair of uncertain quality

Why not just pack a chair my fedoraed friend
>>
>>655045
>>656403
Would the snugpak underblanket work well with an ENO doublenest? I'm wondering if the underblanket and top quilt or another blanket would keep me warm enough for 3 season camping.
>>
>>656684
I have a folding chair/stool as well. Sometimes its worth bringing sometimes not.
>>
>>656961
Yes it will work. My hammock is a Yukon Double and I use the Snugpak underblanket. The Yukon Double is really almost exactly the same as an ENO Doublenest.

I'd say they combo of underquilt and topquilt front Snugpak would be fine for 3 seasons.
>>
>>657098
Is the underblanket and quilt bulky?
>>
>>646556
Just get a wool blanket. Sure it'll be heavy but think of the sick gains you'll get from carrying that thing around all day.

Also ticket to the moon has great hammocks.
>>
>>657159

Terrible advice.
>>
>>656502
In all seriousness, what if tape my thermarest to the underside of my hammock. Doesn't seem like it would give enough coverage, but if my straps snap in the middle of the night I would have a padded landing.
>>
I'm thinking about making the switch to hammocks, would these two work together?

http://www.amazon.com/Dayincar-Mosquito-Portable-Strength-Parachute/dp/B00VJV23CW/

http://www.amazon.com/Snugpak-Hammock-Blanket-Travelsoft-Filling/dp/B0167IYGH6/

I imagine I'm going to have to get a bigger tarp too since all I have is an 8 foot by 5 foot.
>>
>>657318
That's the joke.
>>
>>657577
Yes they will definitely work together.

The snugpak underblanket will work with any gathered end hammock.

The hammock you chose is kind of am off brand, no name knockoff. Not sure how good it is. I'd keep my eye on woot every day since like once a month they have hammocks on sale there under the sport section.

When they go on sale, you can get a really nice tarp, and good hammock, for about $40 shipped. Awesome deal. I have a Yukon tarp and it's seriously good for the price I got it for ($16). Even at $30 on amazon it's a good tarp.
>>
>>657577
Keep your receipts (and your tent) because you will want to return it all after you try it
>>
>>646556
If it's not raining, temperature is all and tarp is not necessary.
but a square of thermarest under you ass ...
>>
File: Deal_With_It.jpg (47 KB, 500x504) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Deal_With_It.jpg
47 KB, 500x504
>>658055
You're wrong and I hate you
>>
>>652725
why'd you post a bunch of ropes anon...OH SHIT!
>>
>>653392
Only thing I substantially disagree with is the LNT claim. Hammocks can damage the outside of trees, typically its only a tiny bit at a time but if done enough it would girdle the tree, resulting in its death.
>>
>>654517


...are you saying I could have a full hammock setup (minus tarps and cord and shit) for like $100 flat? I'm about to drop more than that on just a Eurka tent. Fuck
>>
>>658479
you're retarded
>>
>>658524
no you are retarded.
>>
>>658497
If you get a bug net, under quilt, sleeping bag, and rain cover, you're looking at comparable weight AND price to a modestly decent tent/sleeping bag/sleeping mat. A hammock has a lot more variable of time to set up, depending on how familiar you are with your system.

From there it's preference of hammock or tent. You could always rough it without either, of course.

In the backpacking world, the lightweight gurus talk about "the big four" referring to the weight of your heaviest items, your backpack, sleeping bag, tent, and sleeping mat/air mattress.

I'm not choosing sides of tent or hammock, and I think you should rock whichever you prefer. For me, I like to roll around and starfish a lot when I sleep, so I'm stuck in a tent. But I think hammocks are p.cool too.
>>
File: giphy.gif (486 KB, 245x180) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
giphy.gif
486 KB, 245x180
>>658497
If you waited till woot has a Yukon hammock sale, and got the Snugpak underblanket on sale (VT Army Navy jist finished a big sale) you could have a whole setup INCLUDING the tarp and cordage AND UNDERQUILT for under $100. I'll list the prices I paid for my stuff.

Yukon Double Hammock $20
Yukon Walkabout Rainfly $17
Snugpak Underblanket $39
ENO Atlas straps $23

Total, $99. You could go cheaper if you got a Grand Trunk ultralight hammock for $15 on Amazon, or got a generic set of straps OR just get a cheap foam pad for under insulation for about $12..... you could be all in for about $60.

Without crazy sales....
Wildhorn Hammock with Litespeed straps $50
Yukon Rainfly $30
Snugpak Underblanket $52

Total $132.

Obviously you need top insulation, but a mummy bag works for this so you don't have to drop extra $ on top insulation, since I assume most campers already have a mummy bag laying around. If you DO want to buy top insulation, Snugpak sells a Hammock blanket (top quilt) for about $48 (got mine for $35 on sale from VT Army Navy).
>>
File: 346346346.jpg (144 KB, 1620x534) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
346346346.jpg
144 KB, 1620x534
Does anyone have one of these? I took the ENO bait and I have no complaints about it, but it does need a bug screen.
>>
File: IMG_0397.jpg (2 MB, 3648x2736) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
IMG_0397.jpg
2 MB, 3648x2736
Basics.
Don't need more...
There was a crazy storm all night.
Just hook some plastic on both ends and you're good to go.
>>
>>657605

Jokes are supposed to be funny. You're just spreading misinformation to people who might not realise.

>>658479

Which is why TREE STRAPS are common practice amongst hammock users.

>>656684

Bringing a chair hiking and you're calling him fedoraed? kek. Hammock makes a great seat!
>>
>>659979
He didn't bring a chair you retard. He brought a $200 hammock because he wanted a chair.

Hammockers confirmed for fedora
>>
>>659981
No, he said he bought a cheap hammock. How is cheap hammock = $200?

A cheap hammock is about $14.
>>
File: IMAG0290.jpg (1 MB, 2688x1520) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
IMAG0290.jpg
1 MB, 2688x1520
Tie your tarp close to the hammock so that it can practically rain horizontally so you don't get wet. I put a closed cell mat in my hammock for additional comfort.
>>
File: you-can-do-eet.jpg (29 KB, 500x281) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
you-can-do-eet.jpg
29 KB, 500x281
Just thought I'd post a pretty good deal.

I use a Yukon hammock and the Yukon rainfly. I'm pretty impressed. They go on sale at woot now and then. Usually $25 for a hammock and $17-20 for a Tarp. Never saw the tree straps on sale there though.

Yukon has a kit on sale on their own website. It's a hammock, straps, and tarp for $70. Pretty awesome deal if someone wants to get started, and doesn't want just some generic Chinese hammock off amazon.

http://yukon-outfitters.com/products/made-in-america-combo-kit?variant=10457795521
>>
>>659987
It's a nice picture and all but why just post a picture of trees? Why not show us an example of your set up, not just a picture of the woods with clearly nothing else in it.
>>
>>646812
>>647249
>>647252
>>646556
Guys the only insulation you need in above 40f weather is a wool blinket with your sleeping bag. Inside it works well and you probably already have one.
>>
>>660022
i just pee in a ziplocâ„¢ bag through the night and use it as a hot water bottle
>>
>>660022
But a wool blanket weighs 4-5 times as much as a well made underquilt, is larger, and not as comfortable. A cheap ccf sleeping pad in the hammock is lighter yet.
>>
>>660023
Pro tip for hammockers:if you pee in a ziplock it eventually gets cold. Solve that by drinking it and retain all the heat and nutrients
>>
>>659987
It's the only picture I have, that was in Vermont.
>>
>>659994
>>660032
Meant for you. Anyway, I'm debating on going hammocking soon, but I'm not sure if I have proper gear for winter camping. If I go I'll take more detailed pics. Plus, I need to buy straps.
>>
>>660032
....was a joke, since the tarp is camo, makes it invisible...
>>
>>660033
If you don't think you have proper gear best way to test is to hang in your backyard a night. If you get cold and have to bail and go inside, you'll know you need better stuff....if you have a day off you can even hang all your stuff during the day and take a long nap. See if you get cold.
>>
File: in-n-out.png (12 KB, 450x491) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
in-n-out.png
12 KB, 450x491
>>660026
you just dump it out when it gets cold and then refill.

I keep a strict system where I enter/exit the hammock on the left side and pee/pooh/spit out the right side.

you guise need to get on my level
>>
>>660025
I don't want to spent a fuckton on bullshit
>>
>>658553
no no, you, you are the retarded
treetarded
>>
>>660039
i build a shitter every time i camp. nothing like walking around for wood and stepping in your own shit because you were too cold and half asleep to shit somewhere proper and just dropped one 2 feet out of camp.
>>
File: a day out.png (41 KB, 700x500) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
a day out.png
41 KB, 700x500
>>660050
>i build a shitter every time i camp
but does it flush anon?
>>
>>660039
>not buying the shitting portal option on your eno

Casual poorfags
>>
>>660063
if i can, i build it on a hill and dig shit canals behind it. doesn't flush, but you don't just end up with a hollow log full of shit.
>>
>>660041
A ccf pad is $10 at walmart.

A Snugpak underblanket is $52 on amazon.

Is that a "fuckton"?
>>
File: DSCN0008resize.jpg (223 KB, 899x674) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
DSCN0008resize.jpg
223 KB, 899x674
>>654793
These came today.
>>
File: DSCN0009resize.jpg (414 KB, 899x674) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
DSCN0009resize.jpg
414 KB, 899x674
>>660099
Pretty easy to setup and adjust with the biner with out removing the whole strap from the tree to go around branches.
>>
File: DSCN0010resize.jpg (302 KB, 899x674) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
DSCN0010resize.jpg
302 KB, 899x674
>>660101
Also got a bunch of cheap small aluminum biners for my snugpak/tarp/bugnet.
>>
File: DSCN0014resize.jpg (355 KB, 899x674) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
DSCN0014resize.jpg
355 KB, 899x674
>>660103
>>
File: DSCN0013resize.jpg (309 KB, 899x674) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
DSCN0013resize.jpg
309 KB, 899x674
>>660105
Pretty fucking cozy. 10/10 would hang again.
>>
>>660099
>>660101
>>660103
>>660105
>>660106
Looks nice! Are you sure you aren't hanging too low in the underquilt? I have a snugpak underquilt and I get coldbutt if i'm not careful to make sure there's plenty of slack underneath. when i have it setup perfectly the top usually closes around me a bit tighter than what i see in your pics, but i have a different hammock and it might be a different quilt as well as idunno

pic is mine, but i had the rigid canopy erected so i could put the fitted tarp on top, as we were expecting sleet and wind. it's probably the canopy that holds the sides of the quilt down i guess.

very cumpfy. i'm not dying to use my hammy this winter!
>>
>>660114
>i'm not dying to use my hammy this winter!
**i'm NOW dying i mean
>>
File: DSCN0011resize.jpg (349 KB, 899x674) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
DSCN0011resize.jpg
349 KB, 899x674
>>660114
I stayed warm laying in there for a half hour, but here's no wind and it's actually 36 degrees F out. I was experimenting with different setups and liked the way this one sealed the ends of the underblanket and held the ends securely above the hammock, but I wouldn't be able to use it with the bugnet deployed anyway. The shockcord is taut but not stretched so although the hammock is low in the blanket I don't think I'm compressing the insulation.

Although I was sitting in the hammock without the underblanket for a bit and my butt didn't get cold so perhaps I'll need wind for a proper test.
>>
File: DSCN0020resize.jpg (417 KB, 899x674) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
DSCN0020resize.jpg
417 KB, 899x674
>>660120
This probably only works because I'm small, but I found another use for those biners.
>>
File: DSCN0018resize.jpg (211 KB, 899x674) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
DSCN0018resize.jpg
211 KB, 899x674
>>660134
Inside, so snug.
>>
>>660134
>>660136
TRAPPED AHHGHHH
>>
>>660140
SNUG
>>
>>660101
How much is that carabiner rated for? I got some much larger ones that I could probably hang my car from, but they are weighty as fuck.
>>
>>660144
12kn
>>
>>660145
hmm. And you've never had problems with it bending?
>>
>>660149
12 kilonewtons is 2697 pounds-force. I wouldn't worry about it in this application.
>>
>>660150
My own carabiners are 65 kN. Guy at local shop told me that I had to use at least 50kN to avoid bending. Must have lied to me, or at least not known what he was talking about.
>>
>>660153
Well, if you're pulling your car with them...
I think climbing grade carabiners are 24kn, but hammocking is obviously less stress.
>>
File: utoh.png (18 KB, 700x500) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
utoh.png
18 KB, 700x500
>>660134
>>660136
>>660140
I'd be worried about a predator getting me while all locked-up in that hanging straight jacket

pic related, 10,000hrs in Paintâ„¢
>>
>>660158
i'd be more worried about that piss you HAVE to take RIGHT NOW at 8am
>>
>>660160
I've already covered that though!
>>660023
>>660039
>>
>>660158
The secret is to hang your hammock at least 20 ft high and 6 ft from each tree. You have to build a really big fire to stay warm though, but this repels the skinwalkers aswell.
>>
>>660161
fuck every part of that. i could get down with a gatorade bottle any day though. as someone who has pissed in many things over the years, how the fuck do you consistently piss in ziplocs without eventually getting it everywhere
>>
File: geeps.png (10 KB, 261x195) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
geeps.png
10 KB, 261x195
>>660165
it doesn't have to be a ziploc
>>
>>660136
But how do you lay properly at a diagonal? Aren't you sore after a while from laying straight and bending like a banana?

Laying diagonal is the proper way to lay, that way you actually lay flat.
>>
>>660203
I usually lay at a diagonal. I wasn't out there long enough to get uncomfy in that position. Might try sleeping out there tonight to see how it goes, probably won't cocoon like that though. I'll take a heavy sleeping bag instead.
>>
>>660206
Actually, I usually try to start at a diagonal, but always end up in the fetal position because I'm a side sleeper.
>>
>>660203
i've never had bad experience sleeping in my hammock no matter which way it goes. for a year i used a pos walmart hammock in a bag that was too thin to lay any way but straight and even that was comfy
ive gotten better sleep in hammocks than a bed
>>
File: I_laiek_hamx.gif (3 MB, 351x251) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
I_laiek_hamx.gif
3 MB, 351x251
>>
>>661218
nice
>>
Should I take the ENO bait, or buy something local from www.tiergear.com.au/ ?

TG sells loads of DIY parts, so I could probably rig up something really nice, but I don't know much about hammock building and what I'd need.
>>
I bought a eno camonest xl. Did I choose good?
>>
>>661264
>>661268

ENO is alright for an entry level hammock. Lots of people like them. Personally, they are a little short for me, as I like an 11ft hammock, but there's no reason at all why you should regret getting one.
>>
My setup and feedback:

>Yukon Outfitters Hammock w/ built in bug net
Cost me $25 and is in "like new" condition after 1 month backpacking and being used every night for the past 8 months since. I slept so well in it backpacking and have had zero soreness so fuck buying a bed. There are lighter products out there but most don't have the built in bug net and you can shed a few ounces by replacing the caribiners. The ENO version weighs at least 10oz more and would cost me 4x as much. There was a really nice hammock that I saw at REI that I would consider upgrading to but I'm not ready to spend over $250 on a hammock.

>Yukon Outfitters rain fly
It's an okay product but the value is great. It cost me $10. I will upgrade on my next 10+ day trip but it isn't easy spending 6x the money to shed ~4oz. If there rain fly wasn't unnecessarily wide, it would be fine.

>Atlas Straps
Holy fuck what a waste. Expensive, heavy and so god damn long you could hang your hammock between telephone poles. They cost me more than my hammock and rain fly combined and they weigh nearly as much as the two. The only benefit is you can be drunk, autistic and blind all at once and you will still be able to set up your hammock. I will replace these stupid things as soon as the snow melts.

The bug net is a necessity for me living in WI. Only needed it twice in the one month I was on the AT but I was very glad I had it even if it was only two days. One night was a shelter by a stagnant pond (could have kept hiking but would of had to carry water) and the other was a night I woke up in centipede hell. You can always flip the hammock upside down if you don't want the bug net and the built in one's usually don't weigh more than the independent nets.
>>
>>661310
Is the width an issue for you with the rain fly? I always have kine set up in a diamond, ans I happen to like the extra width.

Where do you find yours for $10? I picked mine up from Woot for $16.99 and thought I got a deal. $10 is crazy for a good tarp.
>>
>>661330
Also I apparently can't type today.
>>
>>661310
Centipedes? Got pics of them everywhere? I was at rainbow in Utah up in the mountains and woke up covered in caterpillars once.
>>
>>661434
That's called tripping you degenerate hippy
>>
>>661289
Thanks mate. They come out to about $250 with suspension and an insect net (which is a lifesaver here). It is a little more than the tiergear ones, but I don't have to build anything, and people seem to like the ENOs a lot.
>>
>>661669
$250? That seems like a lot.... where are you located?
>>
>>661784
No him but sounds like Straya to me. It's literally cheaper to buy even Australian-made shit from the US and have it shipped than to buy it at the shop next door.
>>
What's a good tarp size for hammocks?
>>
>>661867
12x12 if it's a square tarp is a good size.

You can get by with 9x9 if you have a small hammock. The 9x9 can be set up in a diamond if you need more coverage at the ends.

Mine is 11'10" x 9'4", and is cut to be set up diamond.
>>
>>661789
Crikey mate
>>
>>654113
Shug is a god among men. Imagine going hiking with him

woo buddy
>>
>>661965

Thanks
>>
>>661460
That's just like your opinion maaan
>>
>>646556

>comming from /k/

ya blew it
dont openly admit this

keep your retardation a secret
>>
I'm a tall guy - around 6ft4 or 6ft5.

What hammock will fit me???
>>
File: 20130322_183451.jpg (257 KB, 984x840) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
20130322_183451.jpg
257 KB, 984x840
Do any of you guys camp with your dogs and use a hammock? I've only camped with my dog and used a tent. I've set up my hammock and tried to get my dog inside, but he's kind of scared of the hammock and I'm worried about him tearing it up.

Do dogs generally enjoy hammocks? Do you take you dog up in the hammock to sleep?

I was thinking about bringing an extra blanket to put under the hammock for my dog, but that's still pretty exposed. I'm not so worried for the spring/summer but in the winter time this seems cruel.

Are there other solutions? Will the dog just get used to sleeping in it? My dog moves around in his sleep a lot, so I could see him jumping out on his own in the middle of the night even if he learns to be okay with being in the hammock.
>>
>>663148
Yes yes it would friend. In fact, people of your stature are often better off in a 'muck than in a tent on the ground. Just read the specs before you buy
>>
>>658438
Because im a rope using, multiple knife carrying cairn kicking son of a bitch who likes felling trees and hunting anything that moves with my bow.

>witness me
>>
>>663271
>"what hammock would fit me?"
>"yes"
>>
>>663148
Get an 11 foot hammock.

People of all sizes can fit in a hammock, the longer the hammock the more comfortable usually.

Cottage vendors make nice 11 ft hammocks. Dutchware and Arrowhead Equipment are 2 good ones.

For a mass produced hammock, amazon sells wildhorn outfitters hammocks that are 11 ft, they are often out of stock so check back every few days.
>>
>>663263
My dog is as lazy as it gets and he keeps up me at night in the hammock.
>>
YUKON HAMMOCKS ON SALE AT WOOT TODAY

DOUBLE HAMMOCK FOR $20

TARP FOR $17

WHY IS MY CAPS LOCK ON?

Seriously though, I got the tarp last woot sale for $17, it's a crazy price for such a good tarp.

I have a Yukon Double hammock. It's basically an ENO clone. I kind of wish I'd have spent more and got a cottage made hammock from dutchware, but it's still a solid hammock for $20. Can't comment on the V1 or V2 series hammocks they have on there
>>
>>663633
Also bugnet hammocks for $25 and $30(xl). And their separate hammock bugnet for $25 is probably cheapest I've seen for one if someone needs one, I will never understand why those are so expensive.
>>
>>663633
>>663672

Agreed. Hammock stuff can be pretty expensive. Any hammock owner that doesn't have a tarp yet would be crazy not to get the Yukon for so cheap.

Personally I often have a fire close by. I've have several tarps have embers land on then and put holes in them. Sure you can fix the holes, but is nice when the whole tarp is less than $20. I might pick up a spare.
>>
are hammocks retarded to sleep in?

they look retarded to sleep in
>>
>>663723

You're girlfriend looks retarded, is she retarded? And if she is, you don't mind when you;re inside her do you?

Well same with a hammock.
>>
>>663723
They are surprisingly comfortable, and when you lay in them correctly (at an angle) you lay almost completely flat.

They're awesome.
>>
>>656403
Just got mine from there. Thanks for the heads up on the price. Plan on trying it out this weekend. It's currently 15F here in PA
>>
>>663749

and unlike sleeping on the ground a hammock provides exactly the same bed every night - no more sleeping on rocks, sleeping on slopes, sleeping on uneven ground, sleeping with crawling bugs and snakes, sleeping on the damp, and it is this consistency that makes it king among sleep systems
>>
>>664131
That was me who posted... I'm also in PA... where are you located in PA?

NEPA here.
>>
>>664184
Centre co.
>>
Any hammock campers go out with their dogs? Been wanting to trade the tent in for hammock for quite awhile but worried about what to do with dog, quite a few things around here will eat her. What do you guys do with your dog while sleeping? In the hammock with you or tied to a tree or what? she's a small lab about 60lbs
>>
>>664937

Unfortunately I don't have a space to own a dog but if I did I would probably just lay a footprint slightly to the side of the hammock and cheat my tarp down a little more to that side.

My pack has never got wet under my hammock so long as it was off the ground so I'm sure a dog would be the same sorry. You could even tie the corners of your footprint up to your rain fly so that water can't flow on to the footprint. Considering most hammock calling is done inna woods, rain blowing horizontally isn't usually a concern.
>>
>>663566

well, ask a less stupid question then. unless you're seven foot tall or weigh five hundred pounds you're gonna be able to fit in almost all hammocks
>>
I've got a hammock in a stand in my backyard, my first.
I'm 5'11 and getting into it I'm not sure I can make it feel properly flat unless my feet are hanging out of it. This is with my body diagonal to the hammock.
Do I need a longer hammock or to hang it differently?
>>
>>664961
How big is the stand? You should be able to fit in a hammock without your feet hanging out.
>>
>>664961
I'm 5'11'' and I have an ENO doublenest. I fit just fine. Just check the measurements of whatever hammock you want to buy, but I'm pretty sure the vast majority of them can fit you just fine.
>>
>>664937
I had the same question here:
>>663263

But your dog is much bigger than mine. I think a blanket underneath should be adequate, at least in the spring/summer/fall. In winter I'm not sure, maybe try and get the dog to come into the hammock? If the dog is tired enough after a day of hiking, I doubt she'll complain too much if you just hoist her into the hammock and cuddle up next to her. If you have a double hammock there should be plenty of room. She could also shift down by your feet and sleep on top of you possibly.

Make sure her nails are filed, what I worry about is my dog flipping out in the hammock and punching a few holes through it.
>>
>>665061
Three metres-ish, it's adjustable. I can, but the attempts I've made to do that don't seem to give the reported flatness. It's a cheap cotton hammock, I didn't mention that because I'd imagine it doesn't matter.
>>
anyone have a pic of how big a sleeping bag+ hammock + ropes to hang it with looks like?
>>
>>664937
I don't understand what youre asking. Are you wanting to know how your dog can sleep in the hammock with you? You don't.
>>
>>664955
>>665297
Sound advice, think I might just bite the bullet and take her, I'll try her in the hammock first as she usually just does whatever she's told and doesn't fuss much haha, then if that doesn't work will resort to ground sheet and blanket under the hammock.

To second poster, yeh I saw your post just after posted mine, should of searched, sorry.
>>
>>665342
>To second poster, yeh I saw your post just after posted mine, should of searched, sorry.
It's cool man, everybody has a different situation. I hope it works out for you. Maybe she'll love the hammock and sleep like a rock!
>>
Do you really need an underquilt or sleeping pad for spring and summer camping? I'd prefer to just go with a sleeping bag and use something like a wool blanket for insulation since it's a lot easier to carry.

I'm thinking of temperatures like low 60 and 70F
>>
>>667119
When I first got my hammock I took it out in June to do an overnight. Didn't pack any bedding besides the hammock because it was 90+F during the day, and it wasn't supposed to get much below 70 that night. Just wore some jeans, socks, and my thin t-shirt. I still woke up at 3 am freezing my ass off. A wool blanket sounds fine for the summer time, plus a sleeping bag. I guess it's just easy to underestimate how chilly it can get in a hammock. I'd rather be over prepared and warm than underprepared and unable to sleep.
>>
>>665333

anyone tell me how long a piece of string is?
>>
>>667119
>>667384

If it's hot outside, you don't need an underquilt. Anything below about 65 and you need some insulation.

A wool blanket is alright when it's warm, but they're kind of heavy.

If you want cheap, basic insulatuon, get a ccf pad. The cheapest ones are about $10 at walmart. About the best ones are the Thermarest z-lite pads, and they're like $40. They will keep you warm.

For the warmest temps, I use an underquilt I made from a walmart sleeping bag. It's really just 2 layers of nylon with very light polyester fill between the layers. It's good to about 60 degrees is all, but is super small. I use it mid summer.
>>
File: 20160114_155416.jpg (2 MB, 3264x1836) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
20160114_155416.jpg
2 MB, 3264x1836
Cozy in my cocoon.
>>
>>668743
is that a normal plain sleebin bag around the hammy or is that a specially designed hammockhorsecuntpouch? i haven't seen a proprietary one on the market yet, just people making due with sleebin bags
>>
>>668754
Not same poster, but some sleeping bags have two sets of zippers on the same track where you can have a hole at the bottom. It wouldn't be too difficult to cut a circular hole at the bottom of a mummy bag and hem that shit up though. Fuck buying an under quilt.

I'm going to do that with my new bag and do the same with my bug bivy too. Dual purpose, land and ground.
>>
>>668754
It's called the Snugpak Hammock Cocoon. It's designed to go around a hammock.
>>
>>668743
How much of a diagonal lay can you get with the cocoon?
Is it a bother if it's completely unzipped?
>>
File: main.jpg (108 KB, 800x753) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
main.jpg
108 KB, 800x753
Guys, I'm a retard with no skills.

The snugpak jungle hammock comes with four of these lines with a knot in one end looped through a tensioner.
The purpose of the lines is to go through six loops on the top of the hammock's bug net and hold it up.

What is the best way to accomplish this?
>>
>>669257
I get very little diagonal lay, to help I use a blanket, pillow, or clothes under my knees.

If it's completely unzipped, it just kind of hangs loose below the hammock.

I bought mine on a whim. Was like $48 with free shipping on sale. It's huge, heavy, and you can't lay diagonal in it... but damn it for some reason I sure like it. Very cozy. I have a review on youtube of my impressions of it.

It's flawed, but I can't complain about it, it's warm.
>>
>>669318
Using it again today. Has been getting colder, so I've been out every few days, setting my gear up, and taking a few hour nap. I work a swing shift, and I'm getting my sleep ready for my stretch of nights, so it works out.

I'm just getting in to cold weather camping this year. Pushing our camping season farther and farther so that eventually all year will be comfortable to camp. Winter camping takes some trial and error though.

I like to test and see how cold I can go. I have good bottom insulation, just getting it dialed in.

20 degrees today with a really strong wind. So far I'm plenty warm, been out here a few hours.
>>
Thinking about getting a hammock. Do I go with a bug net or no?
>>
>>669499
Get the RidgeRunner. You can use it as a bivy on the ground, completely unzip the bugnet, sleep flatter, etc. It's the best hammock on the market right now, no doubt about it.
>>
>>669560
I think it's the best bridge hammock on the market, but a bridge hammock isn't always the best for anyone.

They're heavier than a gathered end, and you sleep in them differently. Quite a few people over on hammock forums have bought them, and then sold them because they feel so dofferent. Some people say they feel claustrophobic in them, since the sides squeeze in a little more.

There are lots of designs with bug nets intergrated, and others yet that can be used as a bicycle (such as the DD jingle hammock).

People also complain they tip too easy. You really can't roll out of a gathered end, but you can tip a bridge hammock easier. Some people say they feel they're going to roll out of it, since it does have a tippy feeling.

You do lay flatter while laying on a straight line. They are better for side sleepers too. The ridgerunner is no doubt a great hammock with awesome features, but it isn't for everyone.

I've looked into them, but the cons outweigh the pros for me. I don't care for them much. Plenty of people do like them though.
>>
>>669612
Be used as a BIVY not a BICYCLE.

What the fuck is up with my autocorrect?
>>
File: 1293060094510.png (2 MB, 1200x900) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1293060094510.png
2 MB, 1200x900
>>669612
>heavy
Replace spreaders with trekking pole
>feel so dofferent
yeh so you can sleep on your side, belly, or back
>squeeze in a little more
Than what? A gathered end hammock? Certainly you don't mean the RR is less roomy than it's competition because it's not...
>There are lots of designs
yeah and the RR is still the best..
>People also complain they tip too easy
there are mods for this. also keep center of balance low and you don't feel tippy

Did I mention you can slide your sleeping pad into the bottom of the hammock so you don't need some stupid fucking underquilt?
>>
>>669623
I get it, you're a bridge hammock fanboy, but they really aren't the best for everyone.

Maybe you don't think they squeeze your shoulders, I'm just repeating what I've seen over and over from other users of them.

Once you use a "stupid" underquilt, and use it properly, you'll never use a pad again. There is a reason why any serious hammock user, uses an underquilt. Pads are really for people who can't afford an underquilt, or are just beginner hammock users.

You act like the ridge runner is the only double layer hammock out there that can fit a pad. First off, not all ridge runners are double layer for a pad. Second, there are many double layer gathered end hammocks out there that can accept a pad.

Mods for being tippy? If it was the greatest thing ever it wouldn't need a mod, or to replace spreader bars with poles. Even with the spreader bars left out, it's still heavier than a gathered end.

Go ahead and love the ridgerunner, but it's just not for everyone. I've been in bridge hammocks before and they just aren't as comfortable as a gathered end for me.
>>
File: download.jpg (11 KB, 257x196) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
download.jpg
11 KB, 257x196
>>651194
I might be autistic, but you're retarded anon
>>
>>650677

sounds retarded, impractical, and less effective than a proper UQ or pad.

>>651300

No, they're shit. I've used them to sleep when hoboing on beaches on the Mediterranean - they suck. At best keep as an additional layer, they're windproof so good for that.

>>651402

Just make it out of nylon fabric dude, its like a couple of bucks for 12ft which is all you need. Get the widest fabric you can, get the length, gather the ends and then overhand knot them, attach your suspension behind the knots. Done. Requires no stitching.

>>659981

FWIW a hammock makes an awesome chair. Lighter than a chair, comfier than a chair, easier to pack than a chair.
>>
>>669870
To add to you comment about making your own hammock.

60 inches wide and 11 feet long is about ideal in my opinion.

Nylon is fine for a fabric, some people like it, I find it does not stretch enough.

You don't have to sew, but sewing the sides with a hem adds some durability.

For the price of a hammock though, you can just buy one.

Get a grand trunk ultralight. It's nylon, and $14 on amazon for a green one.

I have one, it's good but not great. Factor in that it's $14, and it's pretty amazing deal. I find it a little narrow and a little short, but I do take it on day trips for a chair, and when I really want to cut weight. It's really light, and I really do sleep fine in it, I just prefer a bigger hammock.
>>
New Dutchware Hexon 1.6 hammock arrives today, can't wait to try it out.
>>
>>669612

As a ridge runner owner I'd like to point out a few things:

They don't squeeze your sides, thats why its a bridge hammock with spreader bars.

But the shape IS a slim cut, and its for that reason the objections of feeling small/tippy/constrictive/ lying 'high up' come up.

It can be tippy but ONLY with improper suspension lengths and angles. If you hang the suspension 'triangles' right up to the tree of course it'll be tippy. If you give yourself a bit more length, and hang at the correct 30 degree angle then its fine.

I used to own a DD Jungle. The RR bug-net is miles better.

It's not the be all end all, but at the same time it has no crippling flaws in its design.

I've slept maybe 50 nights in my RR, maybe 150 in a gathered end.

>>669750

My RR is single layer and I use it with a widened pad (a pad with an extra 4'' or so each side). I use a UQ on my gathered end because it fits the design much better. HOWEVER, for a bridge hammock a pad is far superior IMO.

- Doesn't fall out like it does in a gathered hammock
- Its Lo-Tech - Doesn't get damp
- Can be used on the ground if I'm somewhere with no trees or if I have a suspension failure
- I loosely roll it into a tube inside my rucksack - no need for a pack cover.
- No faffing around getting a tight fit

I'm a back sleeper and side sleeper (foetal), never had problems moving around in it.

>>670119

I've made hammocks from ripstop nylon, pertex (stretchier), cotton, and taffeta. Pertex was the lightest and nicest to touch but also the most expensive.

On my most recent build I used 4m ripstop nylon, did;t bother hemming the sides, just rigged it with a 2.2mm structural ridgeline and a couple of whoopies and blam, it's my day hammock / shagging hammock (as I've broken the spreader bar on a RR having two people in the hammock before...)
>>
>>670646

Also, I'm only 5'9'' and 150lb, I'm certain for big fat 6'4'' 300lb Americunts it'll feel more constrictive and in those instances, yes, a gathered hammock might be better - but even then a 3m hammock may feel too short (consider the popularity of the XL blackbird)
>>
File: IMGP8960.jpg (234 KB, 1000x662) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
IMGP8960.jpg
234 KB, 1000x662
>>659981
>>669870
I use a mini hammy as a chair/bench/gear holder. it's moast fantastic for sitting in and swinging
>>
It's goddamn -30 C and I've got a hammock fever due to new tarp and whoopieslings.
>>
>>670694
well bundle up and make it werk m80

also where do you live? saskatchewan? yukon territ'ry? finland?
>>
>>670695
I don't have an underquilt, otherwise I'd probably go and try new gear. Too cold just to lay for fun.

And yeah, Finland!
>>
File: DSC_0553small.jpg (408 KB, 980x551) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
DSC_0553small.jpg
408 KB, 980x551
What's your way of preventing rain from soaking off the trees and down the lines? I prefer not to put knots in them cos they're so difficult to undo in the morning.
>>
>>670698
yeah man you need either an underquilt or a cocoon. should be compulsory gear for finlanders!
>>
>>670701
What if you tied something to the line that just hung down? Would the water drip down that?
>>
>>670701
You can't tie a knot that doesn't tighten? Get a knot book bro.
>>
>>670701
Look up a prusik knot. Use maybe 6 inches of cordage and hang a small piece with a prusik knot. Will help water drip down the knot.

Pic related.

Anything that interrupts the water flowing down the suspension, and draws it downward will help.
>>
>>670701

Just tie something as a drip line, be it a piece of cord, fabric or whatever.
>>
>>670848
>>671266
This, I just use a Larkshead knot with a couple pieces of scrap string, been in some heavy rain and haven't had anything soak down the line so far.
>>
>>646556
I prefer under quilts to pads in my hammock set up
>>
>>657139
The under quilt by itself is 1320 grams which would be just under 3 lbs for only your under quilt so I'd say its too bulky for any backpacking.
>>
>>673145
I carry mine backpacking. I'm not an ultralighter, and I'm 220 lbs, so 3 lbs to someone my size is a lot different than someone who is 150lbs.

I do agree that it's bulky, but it's cheap, and works well.

I have more expensive winter quilts, but the snugpak does its job well.
>>
>>670701
>camo pattern
>reflective

Isn't that a little oxymoronic?
>>
>>673347
not him but it's still better than blue or yellow or fuchsia or the like
>>
>>673348
Agreed. I just find it disturbing when shopping for camoflage gear at how much is reflective and not a flat color - material plays the biggest part, certainly, but it's a little counter-intuitive.
>>
File: Tink Hammock.jpg (1014 KB, 2592x1944) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Tink Hammock.jpg
1014 KB, 2592x1944
>>663263
I take my dog camping in the hammock all the time. She loves it. Actually all 3 of our dogs love it and they all lay different ways in it. But the one pictured is my girl. How she lays just depends on how I'm laying. she will usually lay on my chest or slid off on the side between me and the hammock. Or sometimes she lays under my thighs (theres a perfect gap between my legs and the hammock for her). If your dog is afraid of it just have him chill with you in it. Don't ever put him in it by himself. Dogs tend to be afraid of unstable surfaces.
>>
>>663263
Also, yes he will get used to sleeping in it. If you are sleeping with it in the hammock, hes not going to jump out without climbing all over you first. But I keep a 10' rope/leash clipped to my center line so that if I need to let her down to use the bathroom or something then she is on the line and cant run off (my dog is blind). Since she wears a harness then I just pull her back up when shes finished.
>>
How much hammock stuff do you guys regret buying? How much stuff do you have and not really use but also not really regret buying?

It seems like there must be a hell of a lot of experimentation involved. At least as the norm' rather than the exception.
>>
>>674213

Do a lot of reading first. I've been hammocking for about 6 years now, I've had 4 hammocks, 2 bought and 2 made by myself.

Suspension as soon as I discovered whoopies I made the switch from ropes and knots.

Still on my first pair of tree straps. Bought some carabiners for convenience but not a necessary purchase.

Got two tarps, smaller poncho tarp for summer and 12ft sqr. for winter. The larger one is 6 years old and just starting to give up the ghost and for the first few years did me for all 4 seasons.

Converted my sleeping bag (a camping expense regardless of sleeping system) into a TQ, added the down from the sections I cut off to a summer DIY UQ I had made.

Otherwise just use CCF pads which are dirt cheap.

Really no more expensive than alternatives - no matter whether you're a hammock, tent, tarp or bivvy sleeper there are unavoidable expenses.

I got 6 years use out of a 50 dollar tarp, I expect to get equivalent years use out of my WBBRR (my most expensive purchase had it about 2 years now)

Compare that to how much a technical tent costs, or cuben fibre tarps, or down sleeping pads.. If you're smart you buy smart.
>>
>>674279
>If you're smart you buy smart.

You can't even handle most of this shit where I live, let alone hop in and see how it feels.
>>
whats hanging like for a fatty? i plan on picking up a double hammock. im way less than 400lbs, but still large. Also, is it neccessary to have a fancy ass ultralight tarp, or will a 10x12 tarp be fine?
>>
>>675637
Heavy people can use them fine. Just get one rated for your weight.

You may not like a commercial "double" hammock. They sag really bag with lots of weight. I'm 220lbs and I sagged too much in them. I have a dutchware 1.6 hexon single layer now, I sag much less and lay much flatter .
Thread replies: 280
Thread images: 50
Thread DB ID: 480517



[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Home]

[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Home]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.
This is a 4chan archive - all of the shown content originated from that site. This means that 4Archive shows their content, archived. If you need information for a Poster - contact them.
If a post contains personal/copyrighted/illegal content, then use the post's [Report] link! If a post is not removed within 24h contact me at wtabusse@gmail.com with the post's information.