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Winter Commuting
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It's that time of year again boys.

Questions/tips for commuting in the winter.
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>>889013
Its always that same picture
why you faggots always go to google pics and take the first picture when you could have picture like this which represents riding your bike in winter much better

/personal blog
>>
Wake up to a mig or HTFU.
Get 25mm+ tyres.
Get something to cover your nose and mouth to breathe slightly warmer air
>>
just get a skisuit and a mountainbike
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>live in Australia
>will never know this winter commuting feel

Sometimes I put on a base layer and arm warmers.
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>>889031
Come back when you learn what the word "commute" means.
>>
>tfw made archive of last winter's maxed out thread, then found out the archive site shut down
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>visit countryside for high school reunion
>in some godforsaken village
>have 4 beers
>ride home dehydrated and drunk at 4am
>it starts to rain
>it starts to snow

i forgot how dark it is at night outside the city
it was really nice
the moisture started to creep in though at the end, i need to get some proper clothes before winter really hits
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I miss Brooklyn winters
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>>889048

I live in East Texas. I know that feel.

> was 25 years old before I ever saw actual snow
> grew up thinking sleet was snow
> made "snowballs" out of that shit, everyone sustains facial fractures and minor concussions
> own one coat, haven't used it for three years running
> weather goes from "shorts and t shirt" to "shorts and hoodie" to "Jesus Christ, it's freezing weather! Get in the car!"
> never freezes for longer than 18 hours

Winter is never coming.
>>
No, its not that time of year again. We're not even mid fall yet
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I live above the arctic circle and used to cycle to work for a few years. The winters we're quite chilly and we had a lot of show. Here's a few tips:

1. Mountain bikes are where it's at. The riding position is more suited for riding in slippery weather and ability to put 2"+ wide tyres is great. I rode a Kona Blast with 2,3" WTB Wolverine tyres and even if the snowplough hadn't yet come around I could get to work in a timely fashion.

2. If you've got ice instead of snow get studded tyres. Seriously.

3. Merino wool is your best friend. Get a set of long thermal underwear and socks made of the stuff.

4. Speaking of clothing. Layers really are your friend. With like three properly thought out layers even -30 °C is manageable for a commute. Mine was 8 km and I was fine.

5. Winters are dark. Use proper bicycle lights and having reflective details isn't exactly a bad idea.

6. Wear your helmet. Always wear your helmet.
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>>889088
>Brooklyn
>ice/snow
>fixed gear
>no brakes
???
>>
In my experience there isn't a huge speed penalty by having a large aggressive tire in the front. The combo I'm going to try this winter is a beefy 2.35" Schwalbe Ice Spiker in the front and a fast rolling 2" Schwalbe Marathon Winter in the rear.

To accommodate the larger front tire I had to ditch my front fender and replace it with a PDW Origami downtube splatter shield.
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>>889013
i rode a 10 speed all last winter and i lived in a tiny ass 5x6 text that i had to sleep in diagonally, rode 5km into town from my camp. in hamilton, ontario
if you are so concerned about preparing for winter i suggest you just take the bus
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>>889122
gunna be doing the same shit this winter except on a old 6 sleep miele astro and a bigger tent :D
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>>889031
Cause I just used the same pic I had on my HD from last year. didn't feel like finding a new one haha.
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>>889122
are you really trying to brag about being a hobo?
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>>889098
Where in east Texas? Dallas here. Moved here 2 years ago. It's colder than I had been expecting, honestly.
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>>889154

Shelby County. The deepest of the Deep East.
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>>889088
>brooklyn
Nice meme city you artisanal shrub gargler. Go wax your mustache on a pennyfarthing or go on a gravel ride or something.
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>>889122
you're pretty hardcore, eh ?
>>
no please
no winter
no more snow
no more cold
no
please
I can't take it
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>>889013
steel road bike converted to cyclocross style beater is acceptable for winter riding yeah?
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>>889105
Below Arctic Circle [Scranton, PA]
>2. If you've got ice instead of snow get studded tyres. Seriously.
And make the fuck sure they're Nokians.
Finns might be cucky, but they know ice/snow like a muthafucka.
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>>889122
Being homeless is nothing to be proud of
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>>889123
Why were you living in a tent?
>>
So I'm thinking for winter gear (Midwest) I could get a couple of those underarmour 4.0 "brutal" baselayers and then get some arm/leg warmers, maybe some better glove liners. Anyone else find commuting success with a setup like this? In the worst parts of winter it gets into the negative temperatures but I've still got commitments that need attending to
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>>889105
1-5
6. Wear a wool hat
7. Good gloves
8. Good gloves
9. Good gloves
10. Clear glasses
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Winter bike is ready but i will swap the Schwalbe Ice Spikers to Nokia Extreme this year. Don't get me wrong the Schwalbe's are great but unfortunately very noisy and thats why i am swapping to Nokia/Suomi Tyres.
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>>889327
Ahhh yes forgot to add i had to swap pedals since both pedals broke last winter, bearings grinded down totally and pedals stopped rotating.

The new ones are also cage pedals but of better quality and bigger teeth so the boots don't slip.
>>
Winter tires? Marathon Plus? Some cyclocross tires? Won't the thread limit my ability to go fast too much?
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>>889327
Nokia is the company that does phones and phone networks. Nokian is the one that makes tires.
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>>889343
Sorry live on west shore of Bottenviken (Perämeri) but i will try to remember :D.
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>>889225
>>And make the fuck sure they're Nokians.

Schwalbe pro spikers are pretty damn good and nice volume. Probably overkill for most commuters though, the regular ice spiker would be enough.
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>>889331
Punching the road with your teeth the second you touch ice will put a damper on your fast pretty quick, and you weren't going to go fast in the snow anyway.
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>>889349
Cool, I'm on the East coast. Besides they both originate from the same company but were split up at some point.
>>
crashed twice this week
thanks slicks
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How bad is winter commuting on a road bike? There's a lot of snow and ice where I live.
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>>889955
If you can fit any studded tire on it it's fine. Still doable as long as you can fit a +28 mm tire with a relatively rough pattern.
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>>889968
Well >>889955 are the tires I plan on using, I'll be putting the studded one on the front wheel.
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>>889969
If you can fit them on your bike you'll be fine. Just take it easier with the front brake and corners than on summer.
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>>889955
My first winter commuting I did it on a touring bike with 700x35 Marathon Winter tires. Loose snow is hella sketchy and my front wheel would get yanked 45 to 90 degrees in an instant, riding in the parking lane was virtually impossible since I couldn't keep the bike straight. The only way to ride was in a driving lane on the hard packed stuff or car tire tracks worn to bare pavement.

Since I was riding in a lane I'd run my lights in the day as well to encourage drivers to change lanes early whey passing (nothing I hate more than a last second lane change as it gives the cars directly behind the leader zero notice of my presence). Deep icy ruts on side streets are best avoided. For me a mirror was an absolute necessity as I dare not look back and risk veering into a loose channel of snow. There is a pretty good pathway system here that gets plowed all winter, so I'd leave early in the morning and ride the deserted streets, then take the path home when it was busier.

One thing to watch out for is transitions between different types of snow / ice, like the humps between tire tracks or loose stuff in a parking lane. Just like pavement seams, they can pull your tire and make you lose control. When I'd pull in to the parking lane to let cars pass, I usually slow down first before making the transition to the loose snow.
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>>889973
Weird I enjoy riding in loose snow.

With winter riding the same trick applies as riding motorbikes on gravel. Loosen the fuck up and let the bike find it's way through the snow. If you don't do that and try to keep the bike going absolutely straight you're gonna have a bad time.
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I ride a road bike during the winter in my city and the only adjustments I make are zipties on my wheelset and a mudflap
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>>889978
>zipties on my wheelset
Never heard of this before. How much of a difference does it make? Are you dealing with a lot of packed ice? What kind of tires?
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>>889013
Im totally fucked this winter, my commuter got squished by a car when it was locked up, and my only ride is a tallbike with an extended wheel base and a cargo bed imbetween the wheels. The bottom frame is a mountain bike with knobbies but I don't know how tallbikes handle in the snow.

Does anyone here wear glasses? I can never cover my mouth because I end up fogging my glasses. So I either have to risk reduced eyesight and have a warm face or be able to see shit far off and have a cold ass face. Tips?
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>>890004
A tallbike would be terrible on snow and ice.

I have to wear glasses myself: down to 15 degrees or so, ski goggles (the kind that fit over glasses) paired with a balaclava works well for me if I leave a space for my mouth and nose. Below that I have read that the way to go is to wear a paint respirator over the mouth and nose to create a ventilation system that can be fitted under a balaclava - but it doesn't get that cold very often where I live, so I have not tried that yet. Without such a system, when I absolutely have to have the balaclava covering my mouth and nose, I simply ride slower and focus on keeping my breath as shallow as possible and that minimizes fogging.
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>>890004
You can get ventilated face masks that direct exhaust away from you glasses.
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bada bada bada bada badaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
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>>890012
Perhaps, the extended wheelbase on this one really makes a world of difference though. Its a thousand times stable than any regular one, I can trackstand at lights haha. I'm hoping the all the weight/knobbies/popping little wheelies will help with the little snow drifts that can redirect your front wheel. But homnestly I've never ridden one in snow so only time will tell. I probably have enough parts lying around to build up a shitty mountainbike if all else fails.

I have a pretty sweet respirator designed to fit under welding masks so that might be a good idea, never thought about that!
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My body is ready, toasty toes ahoy.
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>>890004
I've got glasses. I've never used any kind of face masks because I find them annoying. I have a half an hour commute and haven't had any problems so far and it gets down to the negative thirties here.

If you're worried about the cold grow a beard.

>tfw your eyelashes start gathering ice
>tfw your glasses are fogged up for minutes after getting inside
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>>890016
Thank you based trash bags
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>>890024

That looks fucking gay, even for cycling apparel standards
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>>890016
is the perforated mouth an acceptable balance of vapor/air movement & warmth at temperatures of, say, low 'teens to near zero fahrenheit?

u look like a 'chill' dude btw. would-grab-a-drink-or-two-with-at-a-chill-pub-we-both-like-&-have-pleasant-conversation-with/10
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>>890050
This. Everyone should ride in baggy cargo pants, oversized hoodies, and surplus paratrooper boots at all times. There is no way cycling-specific clothing could in any way be designed with a purpose in mind other than to look gay.

Sincerely,

DUI-kun and his cousin, Nikkipoor
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>>890065

Wow, how sensitive. Sorry for not finding your go-go boots aesthetically pleasing.
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>>890066
Those aren't my boots. I wear regular MTB shoes and when it's cold or wet I just put some neoprene shoe covers over them.
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>>890067

Good. I do the same but with road shoes.
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>>890065
lol

>>890066
who even calls things they don't like 'gay' anymore? gbt 7th grade circa 2003.

different anon. i have no need for those shoes because i winter-commute in my sundowner gtx hiking boots but those look like they serve a well-executed purpose.

what do non-fags wear in 2015 again? relaxed-cut jeans, blown out nike running shoes and an under armour sweatshirt? cool. no thx
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>>890025
Not sweating the cold, this will be my 4th winter in nyc. Not expecting negative 30s but I've got an hour and a half one way commute, was just curious if there was some genius solution I've been missing out on.

The real trick to commuting in the cold is to work an inside job.
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>>890016
I've never seen one of those masks with a fur upper ridge. What is the brand? That might do a good job keeping exhaled breath from seeping up behind eyeglasses.
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>>890088
For me high humidity with near freezing temperatures is almost worse than -30C. In those conditions wicking clothing doesn't work well, in fact your clothing will actively collect moisture from the air.
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>>890072
do you just hang out under a street light at night?
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>>890051
That isn't him that's on the roof of the company that made the hat and mask

>>890117
see
>>890047
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>>890047
Bacon has the right idea, with better visibility.
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>>890072
Looks familiar is that the Manhattan bridge?
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Need some advice on panniers and a rear rack, guys

The rack I was looking at (an Axiom) looks really sweet but I saw a guy IRL with one and it swings like crazy. That scares me. I want something stable so I don't have to pedal like a granny and slow down for bumps and turns.

Should I just bite the bullet and get a Tubus? I read some reviews that said they're not much better than cheaper racks but I don't like to buy things twice on the pretense of "saving" money the first time.
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>>890128
just needs some duct tape to uhhh help his aero, not to suffocate him or anything like that... I swear... We can add some vent holes with this knife of mine.
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>>890781
Maybe it wasn't attached correctly. Most racks are pretty stable. You can lose bolts if you don't use a thread locking compound (most newer racks come with it pre-applied to the bolts).

I have a massive Bontrager (out of production) QR trunk bag so I use Bontrager Backracks on all 4 of my bikes because I locked myself into their QR system for convenience.
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>>890781
Get a full rack, none of those seatpost bullshit that snap if you jump a curb or hit a pothole. Look on craigslist for panniers, you can get them for a fraction of the price.

Get a rack which doesn't have a platform. Sure, those things are supposed to be like a fender with the sheet metal on top but you're better off with a simple rack.
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>>890810
Yeah I've got eyelets on my seatstays, this guy had some weird contraption that hooked to a single mounting point that I assume was a brake caliper mount (didn't look too close).

But what got me about it was that I'd assume the real load bearing point is down by the axle (or the eyelets down there). It's the one in this picture. The one I'm looking at is similar but it's the "disc" version which has two struts for the seat stays instead of one in the center.

So I'm assuming that there's a stability issue with these, and maybe I should spend 3x as much for a Tubus Disco.

>>890814

Oh yeah I'm definitely looking for a real rack, just trying to decide between spending $50 and $150. It's not going to kill me to spend $150 but I don't know if it's just bike bling for rando fashionistas (see: carradice, leather bar tape, etc), or if there's a real performance difference.
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>>890819
There is a performance difference, most racks out there are rated for 55lb, titanium racks are claimed to be able to carry 150+lb. You should weigh your options, balancing the price, capacity and gramz

The guy probably didn't have seatstay eyelets.
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>>890819
Nigga u take that back about carradice. Carradice bags are extremely functional and high quality. I'm gonna take my Nelson on a year long tour and you can suck my dick.
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>>890004
>Does anyone here wear glasses? I can never cover my mouth because I end up fogging my glasses. So I either have to risk reduced eyesight and have a warm face or be able to see shit far off and have a cold ass face. Tips?
Motorcycle helmet with full face visor
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>>890927
It would still fog.

Grow a beard? They make masks that redirect your breath downward to keep shit from fogging.
>>
For anyone here who commutes on steel bikes in rain and snow (ie Dutch people), do you give the bike frame some kind of treatment so it doesn't rust? Can you store the bike outside without worrying about rusting?
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>>890929
>It would still fog.
or not
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>>890927
You realize, of course, that a motorcycle helmet will only make it worse when you crash?
Bicycle helmet and motorcycle helmet standards are completely different, the foam in a motorbike helmet won't even begin to compress in a comparatively low-speed pedalbike crash.

You're strapping ten pounds of just fuck my shit up fam to your neck when a simple valved mask will do.
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>>890927

Anti fog spray
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>>890938
Wrong
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>>890938
Did you read that on bodybuilding.com's misc forum? Because that's how it sounds.
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>>890968
Retard.
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>>891025
Nice chart but it doesn't say anything to support your claim.

Not the guy you're arguing with.
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>>889955
Don't. Not just for the traction, but when they salt the streets (as they love doing here in Germany), it will fuck up your bike. I use an old but well maintained MTB with studded tires in the winter. You won't be going fast anyway, so there's little use for the road bike.
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>>890927
Do you pedal your motorcycle ? Do you sweat and huff and puff on your motorcycle ?
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my winterbike has a motor on it , it gets pretty bad here
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>>892189
electric front wheel
pedal power back wheel
all wheel drive, for great traction
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>>890933
Even with a mask on a motorcycle helmet its still fogs the lens until your moving and the vents start getting air. There's not much getting around it. I switched to a dirt bike helmet and goggles with tear offs.
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>>890930
Don't put it outside.
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>>889105
> reflective details

I'd go full yellow waterproof jacket, as well as lights. Makes a big difference on dim winter mornings, especially on unlit roads.
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>>892311
Day flash strobe > SOLAS prismatic tape > yellow clothes. Also, multiple lights, preferably a steady and a flasher front and rear. Also, turn off the flasher if you're on a dedicated path, it's really obnoxious to other cyclists. I just use mine when I'm in dense, slow moving traffic. High speed traffic on long straight roads, I switch back to steady mode on max brightness where cagers have more time to react and drunk cager target fixation is a concern.

I don't want to say don't get a yellow jacket but on a dim morning (or evening), the color of your jacket only makes a difference within a fairly close range.

I also have some 3M reflective tape which is basically garbage compared to SOLAS tape but since I'm vain, I use the SOLAS sparingly and the black 3M tape on the black parts of my bike. Performance wise SOLAS blows the 3M out of the water.
>>
Hi-vis yellow only works properly in natural light presumably because of the UV in sunlight. It does stand out amazing well on cloudy days and around dusk. But once the sun goes down its just yellow.
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>>892350
You do of course need reflectors and lights but yellow is still somewhat visible at night even without the UV pop.
That's why road crews prefer it over orange.
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>>892350
I just get one of those reflective vests construction workers wear over all my layers, and over my bag
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Question for people who live in humid/muggy climates that receive more rain than snow.
>Central Texas specifically
What type of tire should I get for the best traction on often slick, hilly, terribly maintained asphalt? I use a road bike to get to school and the roads around me are really rough.
>currently,700x25c skinny ass wheels with Panaracers
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>>892555
Slicks. Tires with tread only improve grip on surfaces they leave in imprint on.

28 Open Paves are the grippiest road tire i've ridden. They're amazing. Puncture protection or durability isn't great though. The grip, especially in the wet is ridiculously good.

4000s II and Pro 4 Service course both have excellent wet weather grip and are quicker, but the ride isn't as nice. 4000s II is a very durable tire, you won't get many/ any flats with them. Pro 4 is durable, but not quite as good. Ride is a bit nicer imo. Conti 4 seasons have marginally better grip than either, but they're not nearly as quick.

28 4000s II would be my pick.
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>>892555
see
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/brandt/slicks.html
>>
>>892556
>>892558
thanks fam. Follow-up stupid question that probably belongs on BQG.
I have a small bike frame and I don't think it would allow for 700x28, is that right and I should just stick to 700x25 for all of my tires?
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>>892567
If you want to, also yes.
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>>890930
Shoot the inside of the frame with rust inhibitor. Frame Saver is the name brand stuff for bikes. I use something else bought from Canadian Tire, Rust Cure 3000 in the automobile department: cheaper, more readily available, armed forces uses it on warships.

I don't leave it outside because of niggers. But i heard it's actually better to leave it outside because the cold tubes would suck the warm air and moisture inside the frame when you bring it in and it starts to thaw.
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Reduces sweating on the bottom of your feet. My feet sweat like crazy during the winter.
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>>889224
depends on how snowy your winters are and how well the roads get plowed in your area. But should be sufficient enough in most cases.
>>
I live in an area with snow that often piles up an inch or two. It usually makes my rear wheel choose its own line. I have a rear rack that I installed a wooden crate to carry my shit, adding quite a bit of weight on the rear wheel. Should I remove the crate or keep it on? Does having more weight on the rear wheel help stability?
>>
Does anyone know of a good warm glove that won't sacrifice dexterity? Preferably under $50USD.
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>>893294
I've got a pair of comfy waterproof Giros, they're fine for chilly weather but once it starts getting really nasty I find myself wishing for toasty liner gloves underneath and some sort of wind guard over the handlebars.

You might have to get full lobster gloves if your winters are harsh.
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>>890128
#basedbacon
>>
>>893294
consider layering
a thinner glove with wool for when it's chilly, and then a full waterproof mitten to go over the glove when it's freezing
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>>893296
This.
Good dexterity, OK insulation (fine to -15C), suspect pretty good in a crash, have niffty arrow on the back for signaling turns. They say you can use a touchscreen with the fingertips, but this is not the case for me. If it gets colder use bar mitts.
>would recommend.
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>>893374
>bar mitts
do you secure the mitts when locking your bike up? There have been cases of them getting stolen in my city, and I CBA to install and uninstall them everyday.

I'm thinking I could use a cable lock...not sure how that would affect the shape of the bar mitt
>>
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>>893294
I got a pair of these neoprene gloves and I love them. I think they were like $35. They let the water in, but that water is warm. And they stretch over your hands.

Haven't tried them below the mid 30s in Freedom Units.
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>>893294
For a thicker glove than what has been posted, look at snowmobiling gloves. They're a lot bulkier, but they're still made to operate a brake lever and a throttle.
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>>893425
Lobster gloves, though
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>>893429
fookin prawns, man
>>
If im putting together a cyclocross bike from an old steel ten speed, should i consider putting fenders on it or are they not worth the trouble/money? winter around here gets really icy and snowy and im worried about them jamming up, but also i dont want a wet, cold ass
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>>893455
if you're just worried about your butt, get a seatpost-mounted fender or an ass-saver
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>>893435
Enjoyable post
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>>893455
get fenders significantly larger than what you need to clear your tires
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>>892618
Good info, thx
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>>892366
>>892387
or get some strips of reflective fabric and super glue it on to your cycling gear/jacket.
recommended loctite fabric glue
>>
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Daylight Savings Time is shit.
I need an obnoxious light/strobe for the back of my bike.

Any recommendations? Prices are all over the place... I don't know what I need to spend.

It doesn't need to light up any part of the road or area around me. I wont be riding in total darkness, but just as the sun is setting.
>>
>>894619
>only riding when the sun is setting
>implying the days aren't getting shorter
I like the cat eye red senso reflex model a lot. Also acts as a reflector, long battery life.
If you don't want that, get literally any red blinker from the hardware store.
>>
>>894619
>obnoxious
How to be an asshole: the light
http://store.dinottelighting.com/daytime-red-taillight---daytime-only-taillight--seat-post-seat-stay-chain-stay-or-rack-mount-p188.aspx

I used to have an older dinotte and I'd get yelled at by other cyclists on a daily basis

It was fun at first but I felt bad after a while

I have a Cygolite now, I actually think as a bike light it's better than the Dinotte ever was. But if you legitimately just want to be a dick, fuck everyone else on the road, be the cager of cyclists, get a Dinotte.
>>
>>889115
i have not ride fixie that much but as long as your a not an skidding fag , breaking with your leg is way more consistent than calipers in wet weather, again, only if you are sensible enough to break and not skid
>>
>>894619
I've got a bright obnoxious flasher and all it does is piss off everyone behind me and make them try to clip my arm with their mirror as they pass, so I leave it in steady instead.

Get nice pulsing light instead of a flasher, Cygolite Hotshot or Portland Design Danger Zone are a couple I've been looking at.
>>
>>894952
I like the danger zone. Theres a slow pulse like a lady slowly closing her eyes giving you the bedroom eyes. Its not as erratic as most strobes and i feel safer with it.
>>
>>894961
Its like a lullaby for motorists. The other mode is full on spastic, which is a bit much at night.

The thing I like most about the Danger Zone is that it defaults to ON when the batteries are inserted. A good enough jolt can turn off a light with removable batteries. If this happens with the DZ it just goes back to the first setting. I've had other lights turn off while riding at night.
>>
>>894982
the fuck? I've never had a light turn off from really bumpy riding.
Even better reason why I light the cat eye reflex, even when the power gets cut off, it's still a big reflector.
>>
any recommendations for rain pants?
i've heard a few good things about frog toggs
>>
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>>893410
>mfw dat neoprene smell
neoprene gloves are nice for that specific situation where it's cold and wet but god damn that chemical stink
>>
>>895035
>being this hypersensitive to mild rubber smell
Why do girls pretend to like cycling?
>>
Can confirm a super china"CREE LED USB front light" from eBay and a USB charging battery pack are the best value for bike lighting.
The light was 5 dollars, the battery pack was 20.
The pros are I can use the battery pack for multiple items and has a solar panel on it. The light is fucking bright. Seems to have solid water resistant construction.
The cons are that it only has a handlebar mount option, this specific battery pack can't put out enough juice for both lights I bought. The light could be more defuse. There are lens kits available tho.
>>
>>895517
I have one of these lights, the light is great but those chinese battery packs, holy shit. The thing used to last a good 10 hours on a full charge in the beginning and then that dropped to like one hour after about 10 charges. Now the thing is virtually useless because you can never trust it not to die on you when you need it.

I heard they actually use battery cells from the trash (for example from old laptop batteries) for these packs so they can sell them for cheap and make it seem like they work. Wouldn't surprise me one bit. I know it's tempting but seriously, never buy anything on eBay that comes from fucking China.
>>
>>895528
For 20 dollars, its hard to complain. I mean at that rate, I can through it out and buy another one and still be ahead of if I bought a lezyne light.
This ones from a reputable brand too, so that might help.
>>
>>895517
>buying exploding lights
http://forums.mtbr.com/lights-night-riding/exploding-battery-pack-cree-xm-lt6-led-bicycle-light-837382.html
>>
>>895548
>lights and battery packs are the same thing
We already covered that no name China batteries should be avoided.
>>
Recommend me rear light that resistant to cold. I remembered, that my shitty rear light tend to stop working when temperature is lower than -15 C. Planned to replace it, but eventually forgot about it.
>>
>>895557
It's not the light itself, but the batteries. LEDs get brighter and use less power in the cold, but all batteries lose current even faster. Ni-cads are the best, just run them all the way down once in a while to avoid memory effect. For myself I'm all done with batteries, dynohub all the way. Lights just part of the bike like a motorcycle. Come on when they should be on, don't turn off till it's ok to turn off.
>tldr: Led hardware store blinkie light with AA ni-cads, pleb.
>>
>>895565
ok, thanks mate.
>>
>>895517
I can confirm you can double up those light on certain battery packs like the rav power ones, but they take a 2 amp port a piece.
>>
>>889930
Feel that
>>
>>895533
>it's hard to complain when sometimes I don't have working lights
nikkipoor much?
it's not like good lights are that expensive
>>
still no advice on winter pants?
>>
>>895934
I wear skinny jeans so my pant legs don't get caught in the drive train. I ride a fixie so it's really dangerous to get stuff caught
>>
>>895934
Bib tights. Thermal bib tights if it's colder. Tights under pants in extreme conditions
>>
>>895938
>>895944
>neither options is waterproof
thanks guys
>>
>>895982
>what are waterproof bib tights
>>
>>895934
I've been using the Endura Gridlock "overtrousers" for a while for MTBing and commuting in the winter. Just a thin shell, blocks the wind and moisture. Pretty happy with them, usually pair with just a helley hanson merino wool base layer, if it's -20c or colder then a mid layer as well.
>>
what's a good 700c snow tire?
>>
>>896280
If you don't know exactly what you want, the Schwalbe Winter is what you want. There are better tires for particular jobs, and there are cheaper tires, but there are no better all-round at $70. Mine are two winters old and will be going back on anytime now.
>http://www.mec.ca/product/5039-637/schwalbe-winter-tire-700/?h=10+50002+50012+50182+51140&f=10+50002+51100+51140
>>
>>896291

Those are probably sufficient for icy stuff or really shallow snow, but not much tread depth.

>>896280
Also check out the Schwalbe Pro Spiker Evo, if you want to spend a little more but a huge increase in traction. It has 361 studs (ever knobs), and a spiky tread pattern for penetrating snow. It comes in 57-622 (29 x 2.25) which I believe is the same as 700c.. but assuming your frame can fit it, this is probably the best tire you could get for snow/ice commuting.
>>
Are there any winter-specific tires below 700x32? The nokian A10s look ideal but I can barely fit 700x32 under my fenders, and commuting without fenders in winter slop is obviously a no-go same as riding on ice without studs
>>
>>896317
Schwalbe Winter comes in 700x30; I doubt they get much thinner than that. You are not going to find high-pressure tubulars with treads and studs! Totally agree about needing fenders (and lights!) but if your 'going fast' bike can't fit them perhaps it was not meant to be.
>>
>>896530
Oh wow thanks, I'm looking at them now
>>
What's better, cycling on dirt tracks in the winter or on the road?
>>
>>896297
>57-622

Is that width and size? Because that's far too big for anything other than mountain bikes.
>>
>>890072

you should ride them ricks , senpai
stay steezy
>>
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>>894646

>170 quid

>bloody 'ell, mate.
>>
>>889977
triple doubles for the most important tip in the thread

a lot of the guys I work with start getting fucked by snow drifts and ice because they panic and slide out. it's okay if your wheels face 2 different directions more often than not, the forces maintaining your momentum and balance don't rely completely on traction
>>
>>896640
>Mud
Bane of my existence.
>>
>every time I bike for linger than 15 minutes I end up soaking wet from sweat
Obviously it isn't that much problem in summer, but what should I wear when it's 2 degrees? What about -15? I don't want to get some lung inflammation or whatever.
>>
>>897242
look at under armour heat gear and cold gear compression/base layers

they are constructed of moisture wicking fabrics. it pulls sweat away from, and helps control your body temp. you stay dray and cool or warm.
>>
>>897244
For some reason I feel that my base layer doesn't help at all when it should allow the moisture to get out but all of the water gets trapped by my sweater/jacket either way.
Maybe I should invest in some high tech jacket(?)
>>
>>897244
I found UA cold gear to be useless, like a sponge that just absorbs moisture and holds onto it. The UA Base stuff is nice though, I have a 2.0 shirt and might get a heavier one and something for the legs.
>>
>>897242
No matter what you wear you will probably end up kind of sweaty. Try starting off wearing less. When it is cold out the temptation is to bundle up but once you get moving you overheat. When I start off in the winter the first 15 mins or so are pretty chilly but then I warm up and am fine.

Personally I really like merino wool, like Icebreaker or Smartwool for base layers. They are super warm and they don't stink after one wear. They are very expensive though.
>>
>>897242
If you push yourself hard your body produces lots of heat. As long as you keep moving you can get away with surprisingly little clothing. If you get soaked in sweat in cold weather you are wearing too much clothing.

Wear less stuff. Bring a bag with extra clothes, so you can add/remove layers as required and for safety if you do longer rides. When its cold, windchill becomes a huge factor, so if you do longer stretches of climbing/descending you should stop and adjust your clothes.

Body heat is generated in your muscles. Legs and core will be plenty warm, but head, neck, hands and toes need good protection. Keep them warm and toasty, once they are cold they take a long time to thaw up. The best place to swap clothes is your upper body, a its quick to warm up.

And if the temperatures drops down below -10° Celsius or even less its time to stop training. Heavy breathing in air that cold can be bad. Try to take it slow. But honestly i´m no expert on the super arctic stuff, cause the temps round me rarely drop that low.
>>
>>897270
>surprisingly little clothing
I disagree with this "surprisingly"

I grew up in a place where it never snows. My first ride in really cold winter, I made the mistake of thinking "oh well I'll just be making a lot of heat so fuck everything I'll just wear wool socks and wool knit gloves and some light clothes.

Wrong.

Your core can generate a lot of heat but your toes and fingers, not so much. Within a half hour you'll be in pain and have trouble shifting or braking, within 1 hour you'll realize you've made a terrible mistake, there won't be a 2 hours because by then self-preservation will have kicked in, and hopefully you didn't get frostbite. Therefore, cycling-specific stuff is good because wind is a major factor when it comes to feet and hands.

Also seconding the comments about merino, it's a miracle fiber.
>>
>>897273
>but your toes and fingers, not so much

That's literally what he said, though.
You're agreeing with him.
>>
I prefer the wicking properties of polyester base shirts over merino. The trick with synthetics is find products that are advertised as being anti-microbial / anti-odor, because regular synthetics stink after just one ride.

Merino keeps me too damp for my liking during strenuous activity. But I don't mind it on my legs which don't sweat as much.
>>
>>897275
Nope.

I'm not saying his entire post is garbage, I'm just saying that you shouldn't use gut feelings (or the inverse thereof) in deciding what to wear.
>>
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One thing that seems to help with hands and feet are very thin close fitting liners. My icebreaker glove liners are probably 100g/m2 weight. So thin as to seem useless, but my hands are noticeable colder without them.

My smartwool liner socks are a bit thicker, but thin enough I can wear them inside my heavier wool socks. And like the pic says.
>>
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my body is ready
>>
>>897292
Good on snow, but ice will still land you on your ass if you don't have studs. I did several days of icy commuting on a fat bike without studs before giving up. One day I had to ride most of the way home on the grass beside the MUP because of freezing rain.
>>
>>897242
sweating can kill you, you run extreme risk of hypothermia if you are wet. wear layered clothes, start taking layers off when you feel like you are about to start sweating
>>
Probably best to do loops close to home until you figure out what clothing setup works best. Or plan your route with spots you know you can warm up along the way or change into something dry (coffee shops / fast food restaurants etc). Takes a while to figure out how far you can get while maintaining a safety margin. Then you forget all that shit when spring rolls around.

I've started keeping notes in my Excel log of what the temp / wind was, what I wore and if I was too hot / cold. One thing it took a while to notice is that road conditions affect what I need to wear. No snow = faster with less effort = more wind chill and less body heat. Snow = slower and more effort = less wind chill with more body heat generated. I typically need just as much clothing for around 0C before it snows, as I'd wear for -10C after there is snow. Maybe part of that is gradual acclimatization early on.
>>
>>897304
Sweating can kill you if it evaporates fast.
Wool will buffer that by soaking it up and only slowly shedding it. A windbreaker will also slow that down. That's how vapor barriers work. If you have decent base layer, mid layer, and shell you'll be good even if you sweat.
>>
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>repair bike light
>buy 10000 lumen $100 head lamp
>aim it at over people's faces

why do people do this
>>
>>897401
Because people want a weapon
I don't mind it on roads with cages, but on a MUP where you're passing within 2 feet it's really obnoxious
>>
>>897391
>That's how vapor barriers work
I dont think you want a vapor barrier, the reason that people are able to go into extreme cold conditions like Everest climbs is because their are matierals like Goretex that allows the vapor of persperation to exit while not allowing water to enter and get the fabric wet
>>
>>897447
2260J/g is the amount of energy that gets carried away when water evaporates. There is no way around the physics. It's just a question of how fast you lose heat vs how much you produce. Bet being naked is going to be drier than goretex.
>>
>>897391
What the fuck man?
Still air does not conduct heat well
Moisture conducts heat like a motherfucker
Wool does not retain moisture well. Also it's microscopically very squiggly which means it can trap more air between its fibres. More still air = more insulation.
You want the least skin contact with sweat as possible. So the base layer should be something that wicks moisture fast. I have both wool and technical polyester base layers and they do the job fine.
Second layer is something that keeps you warm and allows some build up of sweat. Cotton is bad because it swells up and locks moisture in while it pushes air out. While the base layer should be as thin as possible you need moderate volume in the second layer. If you can't afford wool, fleece will do fine.
Final layer is for protection from the elements. You want to have control of the air flow. I have a cc-skiing jacket. It has a wind-blocking membrane in the front and vented panels on the back, drawstring on waist( super important, you don't want heat escaping from the hem. cold can creep up the back of your jacket and it feels straight up nasty chilling your kidneys). High collar with drawstring so I don't get wind down my neck and chest.
This works well in winters if you don't want to get cycling-specific apparel.
>>
I remember 2 years ago, on a Nishiki Colorado, temperature is -28C, wind is 25 m/s (storm), no longjohns, nothing protecting the head, 8km home. I thought i would die but i live and i have learned.

Windproof clothes in layers, protect the head at all cost.
>>
>>897415
>Because people want a weapon
Then why not just spend that money on a 2 watt laser and mount that on your bike?
It's certainly fucking bright enough, and you can blind/burn dickhead pedestrians with it.
>>
>>897489
Yes, what you say is true but is not the whole picture. You're talking about conduction heat loss. But phase change is probably an even greater factor in cycling because of profuse sweating and lots of airflow. Phase change heat exchange is also the reason wool actually _heats_ up when it absorbs moisture. Wool can absorbs up to 50% of its weight in water vapor (turning it back to liquid), which is quite a few joules. Once saturated it will act just like any lofty material like polar fleece.

There's also radiation heat loss but not worth mentioning.
>>
>>897495
Because it hasn't occurred to them yet
I'm sure if you brought it to market or made a cyberbeggar fund me page, you'd have lots of takers
>>
>>897500
Sorry, I'm lost. So, you're against wool?
(I'm just really curious as it's a big problem for me)

If I decided I want to look gay and buy cycling specific clothes what would you recommend?
>>
>>897500
Alright man Can't argue against that. Thanks for filling in my blabber
>>
>>897504
Not at all against wool. I think it's great, heating up is a plus. A bit heavier than polar fleece. Windbreaker is important is really what I'm saying. It does reduce inductive loss by creating a layer of still air, but more importantly in cold weather it acts as a vapor barrier and prevents evaporation losses.
>>
How the fuck do you guys keep your ears warm with a helmet on?
Putting an ear cover under the helmet makes it fit weird and feel less secure, not to mention completely fucking up my earbuds. What do? Just get over it and ride?
>>
>>897688
Google earmitts
Not only are they functional, they are fashionable too
>>
>>897688
Snowboard helmet.
It's lower liner is removable and it has openable vents, so it can be a skateboard type helmet too. Also work with goggles.
>>
>>897688
>>897688
Balaclava, icebreaker just to name one that's thin enough to fit under helmet. It's really not that difficult, go to outdoors store and try them.

Or here have this one http://www.mec.ca/product/5038-913/outdoor-research-wind-warrior-hat-unisex/?bc=50089/50089+50114/50089+50116
>>
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>>897724
>balaclava
nothing better than operator gear for winter ops
>>
>>889013
move to the netherlands for comfy winter riding

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rETLfzQrIw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5JQr8cm-6X4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZMv3OB6XHvQ
>>
A light weight merino balaclava is nice for fall temperatures that hover around freezing. Keeps ears, neck and chin warm. Plus the material is thin enough you can easily breathe through it if you pull the mask over your mouth. Its more difficult to breathe through heavier balaclavas, and exhaling inside them can fog glasses.

Polartec power stretch balaclavas are nice for colder winter days since you can still breathe through them. I like the style where the mouth covering is a separate piece of material as it adds the flexibility to tuck that part under your chin when not needed (like going down wind). I have one of these http://www.cabelas.ca/product/60424/cabelas-polartec-power-stretch-balaclava , it appears to be discontinued but there should be dozens of other brands just like it.
>>
>>897732
A balaclava is one of those things I really insist on having in merino wool. The mouth gets stinky really fast with all the bacteria there (and you get to breathe that with every huff and puff) and wool keeps that in check better than synthetics.
>>
>>897726
OH MY GOD WHY IS NOBODY WEARING A HELMET THEY'RE ALL GONNA DIE AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAGH
>>
>>897749
i love it when people say that and are serious abouit it
i wonder how this makes them feel
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfLJ876lXsQ
>>
>>897754
damn that video makes me feel real good
>>
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>>897754
Meanwhile, in Idaho...
>made me feel good too
>>
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>>897754
Count of road, mountain, or bikes without fenders and lights: 2. Why does everyone around here ride toys on the street rather than practical vehicles?
>>
>>889013
Buy a car with winter tyres
>>
>>897764
There are a lot of people here who legitimately believe proper equipment is for freds
>>
>>898185
By 'car' we mean 4x4 truck, and by 'winter' we mean studded.
>>
Figured out a new winter hack.

1.Heat up a Hot Pocket.

2.Wrap it up in tin foil.

3.Store in jersey pocket.

4. Keeps you super warm under a jacket.

5. When its 3/4 way into a ride have a warm snack.

6.???????

7.profit
>>
>>898431
>eating junk
that's why you can't go faster
>>
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>>898185
>>
>>898431
Wish I could store it in my gloves. Can't.
>>
>>898185

Thanks but no thanks, senpai.
>>
>>890072
wow, that picture is old. I remember seeing it on /fa/ a while back, lol.
>>
>>898469
oh i got bar mitts and never looked back, and you can fit hot pockets in there too
>>
>>898439
given up on going faster just want to ride and explore. if junk food enables me to go on four hour long rides in the snow so be it
>>
>>898518
and junk food is fucking delicious
>>
>>889013
My shoes are mostly mesh. Winter is EXTREMELY short here, so no need to buy a separate pair of shoes for a month long season.

I need some warm socks. Something to keep my feet from becoming ice-cubes in 50-60 degree weather.

Recommend some.
>>
>>898522
Get some neoprene shoe covers
>>
Any recommendations for windbreaking gear for a broke college student?
>>
>>898582
go to a thrift store and get a cheap windbreaker and jogging pants
>>
>>898518
Eat fucking Clif bars instead you fat fucking degenerate American faggot.
>>
>>897732
No, this is stupid fucking advice. Synthetic is better than merino but even aside from that, balaclava is not necessary at freezing. Wear a ski helmet instead of a bike helmet -- very comfortable (much moreso than even the most comfortable bike helmets) and as warm as a winter hat. Also designed specifically to be compatible with ski goggles, which are good for winter cycling because they keep your face warm and clean from mud that gets sprayed up. Of course you could wear normal cycling glasses (or no eyewear) with the ski helmet instead if you prefer.

For the really cold days, combine ski helmet+goggles with either a thin synthetic balaclava or a half-face mask that covers only mouth and nose.

>>897688
Ski helmet bro. Integrated ear flaps. Go to a ski shop and try some on. I highly recommend Giro, most comfortable by far imo, but most comfortable is subjective to the shape of your head and your personal preference.

>>897504
Synthetic is better. For insulation, Sporthill 3SP is great. Outer layer, Gore-Tex non-insulated rain jacket is a good option. On legs, I like Endura cycling rain pants (which can be worn over something like 3SP or tights on cold days)
>>
>>898612
You know clif bars are american? Surely your country makes its own brand of tiny "energy" bar for little girls?
>>
>>898599
This

>>898582
Also you can just wear a raincoat. I bought a discounted off season raincoat with zipper under the armpits for a hundred. Those waterproof breathable stuff will be more comfortable in the summer, and is a good investment. But when it's winter it doesn't really matter that much because the sweat will condense and freeze on the raincoat.

Those warm-up tracksuits work well too, more breathable but less waterproof. You'll look like a slav.
>>
>>898522
Hot pockets under shoe cover
Snack at 3/4 ride
>>
>ride primarily road bike
>keep old mtn around just for snow

Not fucking up my baby with that road salt. Mountain bikes handle it well, even shitty bikes. I've biked on ice and several inches of snow fine. Tried going through a snowbank once (about a foot and a half high.) Didn't crash; the bike just stopped softly. It was a fun experiment.

Only time i had a problem in winter is when we had one of those freezing rains. Came outside and my bike was encased in ice. I got a lift home from a friend with a pickup. Snow isn't an issue, that fucking freezing rain bullshit is what kills you.

>>893255

>pile
>inch or two

Hahahaha, we call that a dusting

>>895030

Nah, they're shit. Just wear track pants with that whooshy material. I bike in rain in them and it's fine enough.
>>
>>898612
clif bars are junk, worse than snickers
>>
>>893255
Better to have a wandering rear wheel than a wandering front wheel.
>>
Me and a classmate were discussing whether one would want really fat tires for snow, or thin tires (to basically cut through the snow.) I've seen both been used.
We didn't come to any decisive conclusion. Anyone knows?
>>
>>900004
It depends - thin tires are great when you have up to three inches of snow, without a layer of super slick ice underneath. But put ice into the mix and thin tires have no margin for error - ride a section of off-camber pavement with slick ice and you'll go down right away on skinny tires, but with fatter tires you'll have more surface area and that will give you more time to pass the icy section/skid/dab.
>>
>>900011
Mhm. We touched the topic of ice as well and figured quickly fat tires probably would keep you more stable. Snow is rarely a problem/danger by itself (unless it's all slushy), the ice is always a much bigger threat. I've had one incident where the snow felt like it grabbed the wheels, wasn't more than two maybe two and a half inches, but I still had to pedal in downhill to get anywhere - Weird, but not dangerous.

I remember biking last autumn on a very dubious path every day, was sure one of those trips would be the end of me. Some days I would slide sideways to the edge of the road because of the curvature of the tarmac, luckily didn't have any problem keeping the balance. Not sure how that would have gone with hybrid or super skinny tires. Don't think I would dare try.
>>
>>899852
> Fucking up his mountain bike with road salt
> not Fucking it up with mountain salt
Use the right tool for the job
>>
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>>889034
>Considering anything below 28s for any purpose
>>
>>889104
Kek
>>
So what the fuck is going on with winter this year?

I've been holding off on getting carbide studded tires because it looks like it's never gonna snow.

57 degrees on my ride home, the only thing that made it interesting was the dense fog and the rat that jumped on my leg.
>>
>>903028
Snowed once but mostly melted here. Some ice on east/west running streets but I haven't put the studded tires on yet. Also patches of ice around intersections as water that falls out of car tail pipes during acceleration freezes to the road. Been hovering around freezing for daytime highs, but for the next few days it will be warmer.

I remember the winter of 97/98 during the last big el nino being just like this. Very little snow during that entire winter.
>>
>>890016
>What I expected: Fog goes out the breathing holes
>What I got: No, not really, still goes towards the eyes.
>>
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can i get a scarf recommendation

also a glove recommendation would be nice too

I'm from San Diego so it's not exactly snowing down here. But I would like a warm scarf,

Thanks
>>
>>903080
scarves are total shite for riding. get buffs, a scarf with no ends. easy on and off, no bullshit
>>
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>>903083

did i mention i want to look good
>>
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>>903084
>>
It snowed and I already gave up on biking. My bike even has fenders and now my commute is 15 minutes longer.

Console me.
>>
>>903095

Why would anyone console you? Just ride your goddamn bike and shut up.
>>
>>903095
Riding on soft compacted snow beats asphalt. I feel like a fucking shark being so silent
>>
>>903088

wellp i'm sold
>>
been away from /n/ for about a year

anyway, is it a sensible idea to commute 2hrs a day?

even though taking the bus saves time, i fucking miss biking
>>
>>903173
If you take the bus and go to the gym, you might aswell just bike.>>903173
>>
>>903178
i dont go to the gym but i exercise daily at night and every morning

youre right, though
>>
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Thinking of blowing money on this

Looks comfy as fuck but probably excessive for the UK.
>>
>>903178
Yea, just add 1000 calories to your diet
>>
>>903361
are you sure that's not a tuilik wetsuit for, like, arctic kayaking
>>
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>>903373

Here's a promo pic of a cyclist wearing it.
>>
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>>903376
still not convinced, senpai
>>
>>903719
kek
>>
>>903361
It will fit perfectly in UK sharia zone
>>
>>903072
i have the samegear and this doesn't happen. you probably exhale air like jabba the hut
>>
>>889105
+1 for merino wool, i've recently been using a jacket made of primarily that, it's a godsend
>>
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shlipery!
>>
>>905936
do you spin donuts in your 'bent?
>>
>>889122
hey hamilton hobo dude is it you who has the weird tarp encampment beside the cemetery on york?
>>
Is it ok to break in my winter tires if there is no snow or anything yet? Like, can I ride them on normal road?
>>
>>907390
That is recommended to help ensure the studs are properly seated. You won't have to worry about stud wear if they are carbide. Stainless can wear down pretty fast on pavement though.
>>
>>889122
>>906045
anyone wanna go for a ride ever? im also in hamilton :-)
>>
>>907459
sure once I have a functional goddamn bike again
>>
I just fitted winter tyres on my wheels. I used the stock inner tubes (I just got the bike) which said 28-32mm, but the outer tire says 700-35C. It measures about 33mm on the wheel.

Should I worry about it, buy a correct sized tube or just see how it goes? I haven't ridden it yet, I thought I'd ask first..
>>
>>907542
Tube size doesn't realy matter all that much unless it's too big and gets creased. Then it'll puncture, eventually.

Butyl is strechy. You'll be fine.
>>
>>907549
Yeah I kind of thought it would be like that, just wanted to check. I'll just keep them as they are for now.
>>
>>889122
>homeless
>in hamilton
>proud of it

that's a hamilton thing, not surprised at all
>>
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How does /n/ feel about something like this?

In my country it doesnt snow at all, the cold is not that bad, it just rains a lot so my problem is getting to work with soaked clothes. Are these that much of a bad idea?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=witHv-VjKfA

http://en.roofbi.com/
>>
>>908153
enjoy your sail in the wind
>>
>brief dip below 32 this weekend
>ok now I'm gonna finally order those studded tires!
>check forecast
>high of 70 this thursday
what the fuck, winter. I don't want to waste $120 if it's going to stay like this
>>
>>908153
your shoes will still get wet, just bring a change of clothes in a waterproof bag
>>
>>908153
You won't be able to see shit.
>>
>>908153
I'm actually interested in this aswell. I wonder how bad it's affected by wind and how bad it affects visibility
>>
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Just get a fucking velomobile if you want to commute dry and warm.
>>
>>889013
Am I the only one that refuses to ride their bike in the rain?
>>
>>908411
Everyone else must already have hardened the fuck up.
>>
>>908409
retardedly expensive
>>
>>908417
Not at all. You obviously have no idea of production costs and the money-to-value conversion factor. They are just the price they are supposed to be. It's a high end device, manufactured with high end components and high quality carbon fibre or fiberglass shells, Handmade In Europe. If you're too poor to afford a new one, you can always buy a second hand one, or a cheaper model, which will go for less then new carbon roadbikes. There are guys on this board who pay 3000 for a carbon roadbike. The point is- if you enjoy cycling, you will get the goddamn money for it, someway or another.
And if you live in the West and you have a normal job you can also afford one. My guess is you're still a student with zero to little income.
>>
>>908153
it may work but you'll look like a retard
>>
>>908411
why r u such a ninny
>>
>>908433
That doesn't make them not retardedly expensive. It just means there's a reason why they're retardedly expensive.
>>
>>907527
Hmu when u do...
>>
>>908289
>>908403
visibility doesnt seem to be much of a issue:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sCDYFPN9RxY

I'm honestly considering giving this a try, if anyone has it let me know if it does the job, I cant seem to find any reviews
>>
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>spend ~800$ on winter riding jacket, winter bibs, and cold/wet weather shoes
>December in NYC
>the temperature will be around 70F tomorrow
>>
>>908979
NYC master race?
>>
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>>908979
>>
>>908862
It's hardly even raining there. Also, it just occurred to me that it prevents you from properly signalling turns.
>>
new shorts and tank top.
No fucks given.
>>
>>889013
>implying winter has even started yet
It's Christmas and it's 61 F right now
>>
FUCK I need gloves. I just rode home from work about an hour ago and it's windy and cold now and my fingers felt like they were going to fall off, jesus.

Ive got some liners and some overgloves but i guess im using the wrong materials. please help me out. point me in the direction of gloves to keep this bastard wind out so i don't freeze my fingertips off that also won't destroy my wallet
>>
>>909528
get some thin cheap cotton gloves and wax them to use as a liner glove
>>
>>909528
My cheap solution is to get some wool glvoes (milsurp) and wear those as a liner under a pair of ordinary winter/ski ski gloves. That works for me until the temps approach 0 (-17c), then it's time to wear lobster mitts over the wool - unfortunately I have not found a cheap source for these.
>>
>tfw want to brave shitty midwest winters to ride but friends and family are "concerned about my safety" on the roads
>>
>>909925
Welcome to the culture of fear.
>>
>>908653
I don't like to be soaking wet when I get to the office, my bike tires aren't that wide and don't have thread like mountain bike tires, so they slip when I take turns on the rain, I use shoes that have relatively flat bottoms like Vans, and they slip of the pedals sometimes when wet. My work clothes are either in the pannier or the back pack and if they get wet that will be an issue.

There are no showers in the office if I get cold from being soaked I can't just shower and get my body temperature up.
>>
>>908414
It only rains in winter, and that is only on occasion, since the drought started, when did they have time to harden up? 2010 before the drought started?
>>
>>889013
i just ran 23c gatorskins in a sudden hailstorm chicago winter

made like 37 in tips in 2.5 hours.

left before it got wet instead of hail

but hail was such a bitch i had to go buy sunglasses and be late for work (delivery rider)
>>
>>909968
You are a fucking machine, I am astonished. gators in this shit.


I am waiting till March to ride, Im a bitch
>>
>>909968
Well done mate, the weather is absolute shite there
>>
>>903028
>So what the fuck is going on with winter this year?
global warming

prepare your angus
>>
>>889088
This winter so far has been lovely. Riding in just a thick flannel with a layer under.
>>
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any tips for bike care during winter?
I'm afraid of road salts. Most of the time in Sweden it's not really snow, it's just a shitty slush of road salt, dirt and very watery snow, which fucks up the bike pretty hard

I wash my drivetrain off with hot water after every ride but i don't know at all about bike maintenance, like I figure I should buy some kind of hydrophobic oil and spray all over the drivetrain but is that it? I store it in my garage which isn't really heated. It usually doesn't drop under 0 degrees C but is it better to store inside?
>>
>>911490
Better to store in a cold place. Bringing a bike directly from a cold environment to a warm one will cause condensation inside the frame, accelerating rust formation.
>>
Aw yiss, -10°C & more than 20cm of snow commute today.
>>
>>889013
idk if it's related to winter or not, but i have a question related to cycling and i hate making threads.

I noticed a vibrating feeling in my dick last night as i was falling asleep, and today it's still there. A quick google told me that it might be nerve damage from cycling. Any body have experience with this? is it serious?
I've ridden up and down hills for about 2 hours a day for the past 4 days in ~40deg.
>>
>>911773
>No space between the number and the unit symbols
Read the SI Brochure. It may save your life.
>>
>>911807
my bad
-10c & 20CMS
>>
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>>911807
The SI brochure was professionally typeset by folks who understand non-breaking spaces. If you're replying to a forum that extra space is just as likely to strand the unit on the next line! My keyboard has no key for a non-breaking space (or a °) so I just say -10C. It's either that or American units.
>>
>>911825
Yes, you are bad. Please embark on a course of intensive study on the SI Brochure.

>>911843
The SI Brochure does not prescribe any modifications to the proper use of SI prefixes, units and unit symbols in the event that non-breaking spaces are not available, nor does it excuse their improper use in the event that characters required for proper use are not available directly from the keyboard.
>>
>>911747
As someone who has never done bike maintenance before (not the guy you replied to, I'm a newbie with 3 months of riding a well-used '75 fuji special tourer to my name), aside from washing with warm water (which will be cold af in my garage but whatevs) is there other stuff I should do or be doing? Last night was my first snow rider for the record, and it was only really snowy on my uncleaned driveway. Even so I figure I need to do stuff now that my brakes are squeaking a good deal for example.
>>
>>911926
>is there other stuff I should do or be doing?
Why do bike maintenance?
a) increase reliability
b) decrease cost

Keeping a bicycle clean helps by revealing damage that could go undetected if covered by dirt. Also a clean bike helps keep your clothing clean.

Like more complex machines like cars, bicycles need regular maintenance to work well. What and when depends on the conditions you operate your bicycle in.

Before each ride:
Know what tire pressure you want and check that you are in the correct range. You should have an air pump in case you need to add pressure. With a little practice you can guess your tire pressure with your fingers; when you start you should check with an air pressure gauge.


Some simple things I do after every ride:
1) slowly rotate the tires checking for embedded glass or other debris. deal with whatever is found, remove it, check for air leaks, maybe put on a dab of glue to seal the hole or put in a tire boot.
2) lift the bike (maybe 150mm or 4in) and let it bounce on its tires and listen - you can hear if something starts making a strange noise - rattling, clanging, etc..., and if so you need to investigate further
3) wipe off the brake levers, the seat, and maybe other parts of the bike so that they are clean the next time I go to ride
>>
>>911747
allright, thanks. So I should thoroughly clean it like once every one or two weeks?
>>
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>>911925
So you're saying that -10
°C is really acceptable?
>somebody might need to re-read something
>>
>>911974
>Mixing unit systems
>Abusing SI prefixes and unit symbols
Please re-read the SI Brochure.

>>912266
Of course not. Inserting a line break between the number and the unit symbol to prove a point is not permitted.

>The numerical value always precedes the unit, and a space is always used to separate
the unit from the number.
I don't know how much clearer the BIPM could have made it.
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