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Winter Commuting Discussion
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You are currently reading a thread in /n/ - Transportation

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So with winter just around the corner, I was wondering what /n/ does to winterize your bikes, and keep warm during your commute. This will be my first winter commuting via bicycle, so any tips/pointers would be helpful.
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Bump, this will be my first time riding in the snow
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>florida
>winter
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>>704203

Don't bump, this is a slow board.
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>>704204
listen here u little shit
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Wear a ski helmet. Giro Nine.10 is based as fuck.
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don't wear cotton anything. Poly or wool base layers, wool socks, waterproof outer shell. but don't overdress, you'll be cold at first but after mile 1 the activity will keep your body warm. and don't leave any exposed skin. (this is for when it gets below like 15ºF)
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>>704204
listen here u little cunt
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Pump your tires more full than normal because air compresses when it gets cold.
>>704209
This is shit, you don't need wool. Just wear normal athletic clothes as a base layer, and over that wear tight fitting pants (cross country ski pants are good, for example 3SP), on top it doesn't really matter. Tight fitting pants are important to avoid catching on the pedals, crankarms, etc. Anon is right though about overdressing. Dress light, and if you wear a pack you can bring an extra layer in that.
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>>704209
No cotton?
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>>704213
Shit don't dry well because it hold on to water. Speaking of holding on to water, you don't want your clothes to hold a lot of water between your body heat and the snow. You'll freeze.
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>>704213

*shudder*

No.
No cotton.
FUCK cotton.
FUCK everybody who has ever used it as a textile or purchased anything made of it.
Worst fabric ever.
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>>704222
you sure about that nigga?
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>>704213
Faggots act like cotton is evil. It's not. In many cases, it's less than ideal. In some cases it's bad. In extreme cases (i.e. mountaineering), it's deadly. But for winter commuting? It's fine. Sure, if you overdress and sweat it will get wet and stay wet for a while. If you wear a cotton outer layer and it's snowing, it will get wet. However, I've ridden in cotton plenty (including during winter) and it's perfectly fine. Commuting on a bike is not the same as going to fucking Mount Everest. Fuck, I've skied in a cotton hoodie plenty of times, even while it was snowing, and it would only get slightly damp, not enough to be an issue.

OP, ignore the freds, if you are just commuting cotton is usually fine.
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>>704222
Yup.
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>>704225

It's not evil.
It just sucks.
It's un-good.
It's only merit as a fabric is that it is cheap.
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Got a set of w240 nokians to out on.

>studded tires

Make sure you get tungsten studded.

Backup batteries for lights, they don't work as well in the cold.

Make sure you have several extra tubes. I do t think patching a tube would be very fun on a day like OP's pic,

Get hydrated BEFORE the ride. Better hydration help keeps you warm.

Get a full face motorcycle helmet for the extra warmth.

Seems the cagers are more caring on days like in OP's pic, however they don't have the same control of their death-mobiles. Be wary when going down long descents with a car behind you, double so if there is a stop sign at the bottom of it.

The shoulder is gone, vehicular cycling for the win.

Consider carrying more extra parts if neccesary. Don't let a mechanic, leave you at the mercy of the cold.
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>>704233
And comfortable. What do you wear when you are not cycling or doing any other physical activity?
>inb4naked
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Winter is tricky.

If you are working hard breathability is key and you may not need much on your upper body. I'd ride around -15C all the time with just a baselayer and soft shell jacket. But I'd always have to carry extra stuff in case I needed to stop for an extended period (fucking trains).

Circulation is heat, and if you have cold weather related circulation problems like I have such as Raynaud's phenomenon, hands and feet will be your biggest problems. When hands / feet start getting cold your body turns off the blood flow making it even worse.

I've found there is no boot clipless or otherwise to keep my feet warm while riding. So I've resorted to some pricey nimh powered toe heaters.

For the hands I use multiple layers, being careful to avoid tight fitting combinations which can reduce circulation. The gaps between the layers act as additional insulation. I start with a very thin skin tight (but not tight feeling) poly or merino layer. Then wear insulated knit wool gloves on top of that. And if its really cold or windy, a nylon mitt shell, XXL so its not tight.

If you don't wear glasses, consider yourself lucky as that will vastly simplify head coverage.
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Also, platform pedals mean you can wear whatever foot wear.

>Sheldon still wore sandals


Clipless shoes have a metal cleat that conducts cold into your foot, not good.

Tight shoes=cold feet.


Icebike.com
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Wear warm gloves, as warm as you can go without sweating. If you sweat you'll just get colder. You need to keep warm hands so that if you have mechanical issues like a flat tire your fingers are not numb. Ski gloves are great, and on really cold days, even ski gloves. I personally prefer Burton, they make great gloves/mittens and they only cost about 70$ each whereas other brands of high quality cost well in excess of 100
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>>704254
>Backup batteries for lights, they don't work as well in the cold.

Lithium battery packs are particularly bad. I've taken to putting them inside a padded nylon camera bag attached to my bike to keep them warm.

>The shoulder is gone, vehicular cycling for the win.
Yup, don't even try riding in that soft shit. You'll wobbly around and veer uncontrollably into traffic.
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>>704198
Where do you live OP? If its Canada, order your studded tires online otherwise you will be massively screwed over by your LBS. MEC has a decent price on Marathon Winter tires, Amazon.ca looks good for 26" Ice Spiker, anything else the UK would be your best bet.

Used clothing stores are a good place to find wool sweaters. Value Village in Canada gets old stock from a few big department stores, so sometimes you'll find a $60 sweater for $7.
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I apply frame saver and regrease every autumn
some people advocate knobbies or spiked tires but around here the roads get plowed pretty quickly so I just ride slicks


the key word for winter cycling clothing is "layers", as far as materials go: wool is based, cotton should only be used for insulating layers, and shells should be used sparingly.

balaclavas (balaclavai?) are super fly under 0

beware too thick gloves, wet hands in thick gloves are colder than dry dollar store gloves
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>live in arizona
>one week during winter gets even close to freezing point
ez
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Would be nice to see a product come on the market that improves on this DIY winter riding solution. I use the same respirator and it pinches the bridge of my nose a bit, the retaining piece digs into my head and its difficult to remove then put back on mid-ride.
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>>704308
forgot link: http://tuckamoredew.wordpress.com/2012/01/22/fog-free-at-last-diy-cold-weather-cycling-mask/
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>>704255

Generally wool, silk, or tech fabrics.
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>>704282
Utah. I was planning on buying online anyway, cause all the LBS around here are overpriced, or have shitty service (except for one)
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I don't know about these guys saying "you don't need much", but no matter what/how much I wear and how hard I ride I always end up a shivering mess trying not to freeze to death after 2-4 miles.
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>>704318
I live in Utah too, anon! Wanna race?
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>>704322
r u a grill?
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maybe a light jacket
It get's all the way down to like 45 here in southern california, so I'm pretty used to harsh conditions
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>>704309
thats perhaps a little crazy, I normally use a balaclava and my regular riding glasses.
I would reccomend some metal studs or chains on your shoes to stop you from slipping
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>>704328
For more expert advice on winter gear I advise you to consult a Guatemalan.
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The first snow is the best snow, because the only thing underneath it is nice hard predictable pavement. Subsequent snows just create a blanket that conceals all the ruts, snow/ice ridges and any other anomaly that can make you lose control.

After several years of winter riding I've found that there is no perfect winter tire. You need to figure out what kind of conditions you will encounter most and get that one.

Narrow tires slice through snow. If they can dig all the way to a hard bottom, you're golden. If they can't, you are in for a squirmy unpredictable ride. I have a pair of 700x35 Marathon Winter tires and I love them. They are fast on hard packed snow, slice through fresh snow, and push slush out of the way. Not at all fun in deep car churned snow. Being high pressure tires they also aren't very great in rough ice (like riding across rumble strips). In the spring narrows tires can breakup packed snow as its melting making riding very difficult.

Wider mountain bike tires are considerably slower. Then tend to pack the snow instead of slicing through it. This means twitchy handling on loose snow. The wider tires handle rough and rutted roads better. I used them almost exclusively one winter where we had a non-stop series of freeze-thaws turning every road into clear rutted ice. I have a set of Nokian W240s, but probably should have got Ice Spikers or Nokian Extremes. The W240 is not a particularly aggressive tire, and I usually rode my Marathon Winters when the roads were reasonably good.

I've also got a pair of 4.8" studded tires on my Moonlander. Awesome traction, deafening on bare pavement, takes at least 50% more energy to pedal. If I want to I can ride (slowly) along the otherwise unrideable loose stuff on the shoulder.
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>>704326
N-no but I can be a girl for you, anon~
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>>704330
Some people wear ski goggles
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How crucial are fenders? And where to buy a decent pair?
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>>704371
casual detected
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Which would you prefer?
26x2.1 knobbies or 700x38 studded?
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>>704387
I use 40c Marathon Mondials and they are fine even when there is packed snow and ice, the only thing they don't like is fresh snow, and in that case you'd need something at least 2" to ride comfortably I assume, if not a snow bike. It is a lot of fun on my 40cs in a few inches of fresh snow riding through downtown with death cages sliding around and me sliding around. A lot of fun, but not something you'd want to do on a regular basis or for a long commute.
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>>704371
just get a pair of sks fenders in a size that fits your bike.

remember minimum width of 8mm larger than the largest tire you want to run. If riding on dirt or gravel, try for 12mm or 14mm larger.
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>>704387
heh, you picked the two sizes of tire that actually create the nominal wheel size.
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>>704198
I have strap-on fenders for when it rains, otherwise nothing else necessary, I live in Northern California and the winters are pretty mild compared to many other places in the continental U.S.
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kevlar helmet, flip flops, light coat of olive oil
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>>704198

Dress as you would for skiing, maybe just a bit lighter.
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>>704645
If you mean cross country skiing, yes. Downhill skiing, no. The latter would be way too hot for cycling, and downhill ski pants are too wide/baggy at the ankles to fit over ski boots, they will catch on the pedals/crankarms/etc.

Cross country ski clothes are great for winter cycling though.
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>seatpost fenders
ISHYGDDT
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>>704258
>Clipless shoes have a metal cleat that conducts cold into your foot, not good.
you must be kidding me
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>>704703
>he rides spd
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>>704687
Are good for when the snow is slightly wet and gets normal fenders jammed full of snow.
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>>704713
Good when you want to spray road shit into the face of a wheel sucker.
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>>704339
heh. but i'm down to go for a ride sometime, i've been looking for more people to ride with.
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Easy and cheap to keep warm unless the windchill is -32°C. It's probably better to avoid riding those days but for whom that did, what did you wear?
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>>704726
What kind of riding do you do? Road/xc/dh?
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>>704770
>-32°C

Ensure I have zero exposed skin, which means full respirator and goggles setup.

Everything else is just more layers without it being tight. A windproof pant is good to have for an outer layer. Possibly even adding a pair of rain covers over top of your boots to block the wind and keep your feet warmer.
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Sometimes winter is just amazing. This occurred while I was out riding for a few hours last winter. It wasn't very cold, just foggy. If there is a little wind all the trees get coated in frost too.
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Winter riding sure is costly. Gotta get a new bike, and a whole set of clothing/accessories. Tried riding on pic related and slammed into the asphalt hard. Not sure if the ice was good, causing me to fall but not rip my clothes because it was smooth.
Not sure how much I will be looking at money wise. Average of -20C and -40C/F in extremes.
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Personally my biggest problem in winter is that my hands and feet get cold ridiculously fast, like my hands will be freezing in thick gloves when other people can still ride comfortably without or with very thin gloves. So when it gets really cold I tend to wear Ski gloves and I also highly suggest shoe covers if you're riding clipless because most clipless shoes are designed for summer use so they let a lot of air in which is something you don't want in winter.

Most importantly, put that shit on when you're hands are still WARM. Once your hands or especially your feet have gone cold it's almost impossible to warm them back up without going inside for a while. And it fucking sucks to ride when your feet are freezing to the point of pain/numbness.

Other than that, I agree with most people here, you don't need to wear that much on the rest of your body, I usually go with a base layer, a windproof softshell jacket and, if it gets really cold, a fleece jacket over that. For the lower body, long cycling pants and shorts over that, my legs don't usually get cold. And you'll obviously want some kind of hat that covers your ears, a balaclava is indeed great if it gets freezing, Ski gogles are also a good idea especially if it's snowing.
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>>704799
Also if you're riding fixed/single, get some knee warmers, pushing high gears with cold joints will do a number on your knees, trust me.
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I love riding the bike path in my town in the winter, but using your legs as training wheels when you start getting perpendicular to the road gets old.


But its fun because you dont know where the fuck your going.
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Can I ride my vintage steel bike in the snow/rain? Does it matter? It's a Rampar r3 (budget 1977 Raleigh). All I need are fenders, winter tires, and to apply frame saver? What else do I need to winterize a bike? Also I have steel wheels, so should I get aluminum to stop better in wet conditions?
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You need to get used to cornering without leaning, keeping your weight over the tires. Which means turning much much slower than normal on slippery surfaces.

Studs only work when they can reach the ice. If you get freezing rain followed by about a cm of fresh fluffy snow it can raise your tires just enough the studs don't work. And if the path tilts to the side, gravity will pull you to the edge and there is nothing you can do about it. Any attempt to steer against it will make the front wheel slip out from under you.

Riding in loose snow is sort of like controlled falling. You have to make continuous adjustments to keep the bike under you. Sometimes it can be fun.

If you live in a flat area, you almost don't need brakes. You can't really coast in the snow, if you stop pedaling, you will soon stop moving. Most of my clipless falls have been in the snow when I lose momentum faster than I anticipate. But falling into a snow bank isn't so bad.
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>>704831
I would apply frame saver and I hope you don't have many spots where the paint has rubbed away and the steel has started to rust.

Yes. get some aluminium wheels. And some salmon pads. Stopping with rim brakes on chromed rims is dicey.

Regrease hubs and stuff.

Get some really thick chain lube that won't rub/wash off easily.

But yeah, you've basically got it.
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>>704831
I would avoid using steel on the road because because of salt.
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Hardly any salt is used on the road here but I still get some rust riding in the winter. Mostly on exposed bare metal components such as pedal axles and the parts of the wheel axles that stick out of the hub. Keeping those parts covered with some grease helps keep the water off them.

I had my v-brake posts get some corrosion on them making the rear brakes stick. There probably wasn't much or any grease applied when the bike was assembled so I'd grease up canti / v-brake posts good before winter riding.
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>>704198
>early August
>winter just around the corner
Where the fuck do you live? The North Slope?
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>>704258
>>704703
Technically incorrect, as cold is a lack of heat energy, relative to hot. Areas of more intense energy conduct onto areas with less, not the other way around. But the effect is the same -- your feet get cold.
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>>704203
I live in Minneapolis and bike ~10 miles/day through our clusterfuck of a winter. Some tips:
—Get thicker tires. You don't need anything huge, but if you're used to biking down paved city streets your current tires aren't going to do shit. I've never been into studded tires, as it can be a harsh speed drop, but do what you want. This guy knows what he's talking about, consult here for further advice on ice/snow/tires: >>704338
—It's been pointed out, but, really, no cotton. You'd be surprised by how much you heat up, though, so make sure you can unzip a top layer. We dropped below -30F this last year (windchill included) and for most of my ride I was just wearing an unbuttoned bulky jacket, a cheap flannel, a t-shirt, jeans, gloves, headgear and some bulky Merrells. That said, I've always been good at withstanding the cold, so your mileage may vary.
—Head protection is key. I wore a thick ski mask, ski goggles, and a bike helmet. (Aside: if you want to stay effay, be prepared to allow two minutes for hair maintenance whenever you arrive at your destination.)
—Holy fucking shit, the salting. When the sodium and all that starts getting laid down, be prepared to either take amazing care of your gears and chain or just give up early and resign yourself to keeping it technically functional and fixing it up in March.
—Can confirm everything this guy is saying about turning in snow and ice, as well as brakes: >>704833
—Sometimes you'll need to get into a bizarre workout-ish mentality to push yourself through it, which is okay because you'll be burning ridiculous numbers of calories anyways.
—The nice thing about all of this, especially dressing, head protection, and turning, is that November will ease you into it.

Good luck. Where do you live, by the way?
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>>705593
Not the dude you're replying to, but OP. I live in Utah. Our winters can get pretty crazy.
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>>704309
I like it
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>>705659
yeah same here, iowa reporting in, our winters are all over the place. Lows in the -20s and all that good shit
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>>705659
>Our winters can get pretty crazy.
In the northern half of the state, anyway.
What I'd give to live in St. George instead of Cache Valley.
Hell, I'd take SLC since it'd mean I'd be somewhere where things actually happen.
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>>704222
in the cold yeah but in summer cotton tees are the shit
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>>704308
contact lenses
no foggy glasses ever again

also a bit of window cleaner or washing up liquid gently rubbed into the inside of the goggles iiwht a dry cloth works great.
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>>704206
snowboard*
>>704198
but yea, there really is no need to bump. threads stick around for weeks sometimes.
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>>704313
you must look like the most retarded fedora tipping faggot ever.
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This will be my first winter as well. I'm thinking of putting away the road bike at first snow, but I don't have a second bike besides a steel fixie I think I want to get rid of instead of riding it ever again. Any suggestions? $800 budget
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>>705740
How are your winters? What kind of terrain are you covering and how long of distance and all that?
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>>705740
Should be able to get an older rigid mtb fairly cheap. If you are used to riding fixie, single speed might be a good option so you don't have to deal with derailleur / cassette issues. Fenders are good for the early and late winter road slop.

Honestly a lot of you budget could end up going towards clothing rather than bike stuff. I spent a lot the first two winters trying to find stuff that works. But the clothing I bought should last a long time.
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One thing to note with geared bikes is that moisture can build up in the cable housing loop that goes into the rear derailleur. Water kicked up by the tires can run along the cable into the housing. When that freezes up shifts get very sloppy and the bike might not up shift at all.

Whenever that happens I pull off the rear loop and spray it out with WD40.
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>>705744
I've got a variety of winter gear already even got some on sale in the spring at my lbs. I prefer my road bike now honestly, but the idea of maintenance on them with salt makes me cringe. Is there fear of using a certain frame material in the winter? If I can help I don't want to ride steel again.
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>>705741
Winters aren't bad, at the very coldest with wind chill it still rarely drops below 0. Couple inches on the ground mostly maybe 1-2 ft a day or two if at all. Mostly I ride a bike trail although I don't know if it ever gets plowed and streets. Mostly flat terrain with a few "hills" and round trip is only 16 miles round trip 5 days a week. I would still want to try my joy riding on the weekend though in the snow unless it proves to be miserable riding in it, but I think I will have fun.
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>>705754
bikesdirect.com/products/gravity/g29ss.htm
This with an IGH maybe. Get some more road worthy tires, maybe upgrade the discs. That would be under your budget and a solid winter bike.
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>>705683
>Cache Valley
haha i feel for you man. I used to live in logan. Living in Ogden at the moment. Not much better, but definitely an upgrade.
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>>705698
This thread is over a year old. >>519718
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Cold weather means a runny nose. Better get used to shooting snot rockets. The underground parking where I kept my bike was dusty so even after the monthly hose down the remnants of my post commute nostril clearing remained.
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>>706197
that's fucking disgusting.
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>>705659
Having lived in Minneapolis and currently living in SLC, lolno, our winters are not "pretty crazy".
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>>706398
Be happy you didn't live here this last winter, shit got more intense than I've ever seen and I've lived here for 17 years.
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>>706197
You know, such things as paper tissues exist. They aren´t expensive either.
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>>704198
>winter just around the corner
pls fuck off, Im still enjoying our short summer dont remind me about our 6 month winter
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>>704394
I ride 2" Mondials and yes they are really nice. Also on bad roads in summer. We also have super sharp gravel on the roads at winters and I haven't had any flats with them. Earlier I got some normal mtb-tires and I got several flats during the first month of winter and the gravel.
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>>706807
Canadian as well I see.
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>>706398
Dude, minneapolis biker here. Last winter during the polar vortex (-30F, -50 wind chill) one of my headset bearings exploded. Shit this year was intense to say the least.
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>>706740
Also, jumped to post before i read this.
Glad someone shares my agony, haha
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Any good winter glove recommendations?
I got by last winter with some crappy wool liners and my normal gloves, those are falling apart though. Negative degree temperatures aren't too uncommon, so something pretty warm.
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>>707038
For cold days, Burton ski gloves. Their gloves are excellent quality and very warm. They cost about $60-$70 but well worth it, they're as good as other gloves that cost about twice that. For *extremely* cold days, Burton mittens are great, but you'll rarely if ever need that because you'll stay warm from cycling.

For milder days (30s and 40s Fahrenheit probably, but depends on the person), Giro Ambient cycling gloves, or 3SP gloves (intended for cross country skiing I think), are good.
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>>707077
Also, if you get the "Ambient City" you're a hipster faggot as bad as fixie riders (and you're spending a lot more money than you have to). Just get the standard Ambient. They're great gloves.
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>>706398
>>706740
>>707027

Well shit. I retract what I said here >>705659

I bitch and whine about how I'm freezing every time it gets below like 10 degrees. I can't imagine what commuting in that shit is like. I'll think of you guys when I get cold this winter and be thankful I'm not you.
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If you find your feet get overly sweaty, applying an antiperspirant to the soles can help reduce sweating. It has to be an anti-antiperspirant not a deodorant. I use Arid unscented roll-on, to avoid an aerosol toxic cloud.

A good way to dry out boots for the ride home (particularly if you keep them in a locker) are silica gel desiccant beads. I have pic related, but I don't think anyone sells them anymore. They need to be kept in air tight bags between uses to prevent them from absorbing moisture from the air. Microwave them to force out the moisture when they become less effective.

A DIY set could be made using an old pair of cotton socks, and silica beads ordered online (white non-indicating type as the colored ones can be toxic). I weighed mine and they are about 350g each.

You can get the beads either loose or bagged. Price per gram vary wildly and sometimes the bagged ones end up being cheaper than the loose ones unless you are buying 5lbs or more. This one seems to be about the cheapest:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Large-300-gram-Desiccant-Pack-Silica-Gel-Rechargeable-Dehumidifier-Dry-Storage-/330718803769
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Bumping with questions:

Rode my bike last year through the first half of the winter, and am forced to leave it out in the elements. Numerous times my derailleur would freeze and I'd have issues with my chain.

Has anyone moved to a beater single speed or fixed gear for an entire winter? Seems like it'd be a smart thing to do, as during the winter I ride to get to places much faster than it would take if I were to simply walk there, even going at a leisurely pace. No car means walk, ride, or bus, riding being the most convenient of the three.
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>>709203
Unless the gears were packed with ice, the problem is probably ice buildup inside the cables. The main culprit is usually the loop going into the derailleur. I wonder if a derailleur with direct cable routing would be less susceptible to freezing.
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>>707038
During the worst of my winter, I would wear ski gloves to start out. After a few suburbs, my hands would be over-heating though and I'd swap to some Fox branded wet weather gloves. If it was dry, a few suburbs later I'd swap to some thinner liners under fingerless gloves.

Took a pannier to hold all that shit in but it meant my fingers didn't freeze and I could still work the brakes after 26km.
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how 2 prep steel road bike for winter

I can't afford a whole new bike but I can stud some throwaway tires and step up my lube game I guess
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>>704204
fucking big league chew piece of shit
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>>705659
fuck you, Edmonton reporting in
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>>709317
>edmonton
>cold

you get the warm pacific air.

regards, saskatoon.
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I try to avoid using my front brake too much during the winter. When turning it seems more prone to locking up the front wheel.

Slow tight u-turns are almost not worth attempting in the snow. The front wheel will side sideways, even on a fat bike. I've got in the habit of doing a kind of wheelie turn popping the front wheel off the ground, which is easy in 22x36.
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>>709347
that's cute

Sincerely, Winnipeg
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>>713020
>Braking while turning
>ever
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AZ reporting in. What's a winter? I'm looking forward to my afternoon commute being 60 instead of 100 in a few months though...
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>>709317
>>709347
>>713022

Calgarian here.

Cold is cold, and snow is snow. I think we can all agree that laying fresh tracks and beating winter traffic feels fucking amazing.
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>>713126
Hey Calgarian here too! Just got my bike road ready now. Wondering how you commute in the winter and how long it is. I'm kind of worried with the snow and my out of the way ride. I live just off metis and plan to go down to the university for as much of the year as possible. Feasible?
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>>713126
>Cold is cold

Nah, prairie cold is a dry cold. Despite being much colder it doesn't feel as bad as a damp cold.
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if you fall on a ti bike how likely are you to break it?
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>>713148
>not sacrificing your body to protect your bike during a fall.

They use Ti in SPAAAAACE. Should be fine in the cold.
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>>713144
Get another bike for your commute. Wouldn't want your shiny fancy new bike getting crapped on. Previous years I use my pass and skip the bike, but thinking of commuting by bike this year. Should be fine once you reach nose creek/bow? There's a pathway behind the childrens hospital connecting bow to university if you don't already know
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>>713145
what the gosh darn heck is a damp cold? are you measuring humidity? praires average 70% humidity over the winter. also windy.

but honestly if you are wearing clothes it should feel room temperature so temperature isn't a real problem, only endurance.
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>>713189
Relative humidity sure, but cold air can't hold as much moisture as warm air. My skin gets cracked from the lack of moisture in the air during the winter.
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>>709203
>fixie during winter
This is the most fucking retarded thing I have heard in my life. Even with brakes, you want to be able to coast, especially when you have fucking snow and ice.

A single speed could work if you live in a really flat area.
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>>704309
This is an incredibly smart idea but I'd get the blue silicone model respirator since it's more comfortable and it's designed to force exhaled breath downwards and deals with moisture buildup a lot better. You can also slide it down very quickly and not have to deal with straps. No question that you can hook it up to your helmet without issue, I've done this with a welding mask for years now.

I'd throw on the solid air filters since they're designed for wet environments. Model 3M Particulate Filter 7093 with the purple sticker on it.
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I use an old Scott Scale 60 26'er mtb with spiked winter tyres in the winter.

But you will need layered and wind proof clothes otherwise it's torture at -15C or colder especially if it's storming.

I almost gave up last winter, almost hurricane winds and -22C below zero. At one point i even thought i would die but then i got really really mad .

After that i keep wind breakers and extra clothes in a backpack.
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>>713372
I might have to upgrade to one of those, should work better with goggles around the nose bridge area. I have one similar to the link, but it deflects breathe downwards.

I didn't add side deflectors for the intakes. And I didn't tape up the exhaust as it also acts as a drain (I blocked it off once, yuck). After having my intake valves freeze shut at -30C, I removed them.
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>>713388
Ordered one from China on ebay for $20 without filters. They said its not fake!
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>>713183
My "new" bike is really an old Peugeot I picked up from Kijiji. Thanks for the advice. I have a pretty good route planned out that I'm testing next week. Was curious if anyone else in Calgary even attempted long winter commutes. Thanks again. If I can't bike all the way there in winter I'll just train the rest of the way.
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This will be my first winter commuting and working here in Lincoln, NE. I'm a delivery biker for Jimmy Johns, I'm scared but also looking forward to it. I'm hoping to get a lot of sympathy tips. Anyone here have experience delivering through winter and snow?

Might get a new bike for the winter altogether, I treat my Specialized like shit as it is and couldn't bare seeing it undergo more abuse.
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>>704338

No. If your location has any serious snow, tires that "cut through" are much worse than honest, big fat knobby tires. This is the truth. Why? Because when you reach a point that you cannot just slice under the snow, balancing on the snow on a narrow tire becomes unpredictable, slow and dangerous, whereas a big fat tyre works as a snow shoe. It goes (or at least tries to) rise ontop of the snow and stay there. Ride becomes much more steady and safe.

Fat bikes are popular for this reason (you can't cut through sandy beaches, so you stay on top of them).

Marathon Winters are popular, but they aren't very good if you actually experience winter. They get filled with snow very quickly and have very few studs. Any pools of ice are still very dangerous.

Whereas Nokian's or Suomi Tyres have models with over 200 studs, that are the best against perfectly smooth ice. I refuse to fall again because of ice.

Then, if you want to make sure you absolutely beat the weather no matter what, then Ice Spiker Pro tires are fat, knobby and full of studs. Expensive as fuck, but it's the best you can get for winter.

That is, unless you wish to change winter tires according to daily weather. I hope no-one actually does this
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>>705593

"I've never been into studded tires"

It just depends where you live. If you have zero patches of ice, then studded tires are not that necessary. However, if you suddenly come a cross of lets say 2x2 metres of perfectly smooth ice, non-studded tires will not keep you upright. I tried this. I thought I could ride through it if I did no steering at all and stopped pedaling. Didn't matter. Lost grip immediately, as if there was none.
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A lot of times once you are stopped in soft powdery snow you won't be able to start again, which means pushing the bike for a while. When I start to bog down in loose snow, I apply as much power as I can to maintain forward momentum and spin through the loose spot. It usually happens so fast that shifting won't help as the chain is under too much load. Upshifting under load more often than not will cause the chain to slip killing the last of your momentum.

I seem to get calf muscle pulls more frequently in the winter. I think it has to do with bouncing across rough surfaces, and applying power just as a calf drops down. I'm also more likely to pull a calf muscle when fatigue sets in and my pedaling technique gets sloppy.

I started wearing calf compression sleeves every ride during the winter and rarely have problems.
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>>713648
lol at sympathy tips. That shit doesnt work with niggers and college kids. You will think people are tipping better, but the reality is you are just doing way more deliveries.

My suggestion would be a SS rigid mtb with disc brakes for winter deliveries. Monocog or Karate Monkey. Thicker tires allow you to ease over the snow ridges that form on the street from car tires. The extra clearance allows salt and grime to pass through your fork and rear triangle. And single speed eliminates complications from deraileurs freezing up. Knobbies dont make a difference either because snow backs inbetween them. Might as well go with a 45c smooth tire or similar. Get a rear fender and you are set.

The real challenge is clothing.
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>>704213
Kotton kills dude.
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>>714470
as far as clothes there is an under armor store at nebraska crossing between Omaha and Lincoln. Save up some money and get out their come fall. their base layers and ski gear are awesome for riding.
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Should I get thick winter rims/tyres and fenders for my bike or should I just get a cheap beater to pedal around on?

We get a lot of salt on the roads here but I mostly stay on the paved bike network that dosen't get salted much.
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>>714907
Why not both?
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Has anyone personally tried these kind of tires, are they effective?
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>>704198
I don't bicycle in winter anymore (Canada). At some point I decided it was stupid.
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>>714863
Base layers arent hard. You can find wool for cheap at any thrift store. 2 or 3 of those plus an insulated jacket and you are g2g.

The hard part is keeping extremities warm. My feet have a smart wool base, plastic bag, heavy hiking wool, then boots. Problem with this is they get soaked regardless, either from snow/rain, or trapped sweat, thus getting real cold and uncomfortable.

Hands are hard. The cheap dollar store gloves make good base layers, but do shit for water or wind protection. Usually double up but after a 5 hour shift my hands still bring pain. Thinking about going neoprene or kayaking style gloves.

Mind you snow is not my biggest worry in winter. Snow is ok. Snow insulates. Its rain in the 30 - 40 degree range that absolutely sucks fucking ass. Rain is the god damned devil and what makes winter cycling hell.
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>>714928
Get the fuck out on /n/, faggot.
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>>714907
>fenders
lol fag

Just get 40c semi-knobby tires, you can probably even use them on the wheels you have now
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Layered clothing feels like a myth. No matter how cold it gets, I can never wear more than a t-shirt and jacket. Even then it always gets too hot in the end. At least in -15C
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>>714917
I have 700x35 marathon winters on my touring bike and really like them, mostly because they roll fast. Best on the hard packed snow we get here. They also seem to be good in slush when run at max pressure. A real handful in loose car churned snow.
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>>704320
u gotta ride faster
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>>704320
I ride in a t-shirt and shorts when it's like 14F (-10C).
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>>715042
Insulation AND wicking is why people layer.
Your t-shirt does nothing and your jacket traps humidity making you sticky and wet.

First layer is for spreading your sweat out over large surface to ease evaporation. Second layer is your insulation but it has to be highly permeable to air. Third layer is just a windbreaker. So when you need to shed excess moisture you open the windbreaker and let the air blow through your midlayer.
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>bump to keep from falling off board
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>>715067
fatty
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>>704198
Washington here

What's the best way to commute to work in the rain and not get soaked on the way there?

Other than mud guards what should I get?
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>>718791
Poncho, swept back bars
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Delivery rider here. I wanna get my bike prepped and ready for winter. It's fixed right now but I've been thinking of going back to gears . should I save an buy a older bike with gears or just switch my bike to single speed?

Also, What's a good site for winter clothes? can I just grab some under armor and use my soft shell rain jacket?
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>>718914
>Also, What's a good site for winter clothes? can I just grab some under armor and use my soft shell rain jacket?
Cross country ski clothes (i.e. Sporthill 3SP, or yeah underarmor, same type of stuff). Also, downhill ski helmets are awesome. As warm as a winter hat, extremely comfortable (moreso than cycling helmets even), plus a lot of people do it during winter so you won't look retarded. Some people wear ski goggles as well, they are good because they don't fog easily and they provide a significant amount of warmth to your face.

As for a bike, I read on /n/ (maybe even this thread) that you should not use steel bikes during winter because of salt on roads. Not sure how much truth there is to that. I would get a geared bike but I wouldn't ride a ss during summer either, that's really up to you. You'll probably want fairly wide semi-knobby tires to deal well with the snow and ice. Something like Marathon Mondials perhaps? I don't know much about tire options so I'm just throwing one out there that may or may not be ideal.
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>>718914
>>718927
Oh, and for site, assuming you meant website to order from. If possible try some on in person first. Check places like REI, cross country ski shops, outdoor/camping/mountaineering stores, etc. Online probably places like Sierra Trading. And if you get a ski helmet for winter cycling you should definitely try it on before buying, go to a ski shop and try some on.
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>>718791
Rain pants and a shell, and some kind of hat under your helmet, booties help a lot too
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>>718927
>not use steel bikes during winter because of salt on roads
Only if you're too much of a bitch to properly clean your bicycle after every ride.
Cleaning goes especially well if you use an old, greasy rag to clean the nooks and crannies, since the thin deposit of grease will help protect it.
>>718914
>save an buy a older bike with gears
Using an old beater for winter commuting is generally recommended, since even with meticulous cleaning, winter riding wears on a bike more than summer.
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>>718914
>>718928
The ski gear is spot on.

Also, take into account that some mountaineering gear is much much cheaper than biking gear, and just as good.

I got some thick and some skinny gloves for 5€ and 2€ respectively last winter and they're great, plus I can use only one or the other according to how cold it is.

A cycling branded equivalent would start at 20€ for a single pair of winter gloves.

The downside is that maybe you won't look as cool, but who cares.
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Would I look retarded running tyres more expensive than the bike? Say, ice spikers on a $40 rigid raleigh. My summer commute includes downhill sections running up to 50km/h without pedalling. I tried road biking last year, hardly leaned into a turn and took a spill from the ice.

Don't really want to fork out extra cash to buy a nice mtb just to ride it in winter...
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>>719971
Only bike nerds might notice, and even if they did it's not at all unusual to see crappy frames being used for sacrificial winter bikes.
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>>713144

This guy >>713126

My commute wasn't too long (~20km round trip). I don't have access to pathways, so most of the ride was on road and shitty dirt path. Also, I didn't have a car all winter so any time I had to go to the gym or get groceries, it was on a bike.

Where exactly are you? Metis Trail to the Uni would be a bit tough during the winter. I know that the pathway system that would get you there, but I'm not sure if they clear it often enough to make it feasible- Especially during the early morning. To be honest, I'd just stick to the Train and/ or bus. If you can find a bus that takes you a bit closer and has a bike rack on the front, that might let enjoy your ride a bit more, haha.
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>>720019
What quadrant? 36th street at Country Hills is what I'm taking now, down to 19th street and then across 20th ave is my route.
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>>715071

I've tried that. I just got much, much hotter. The only way to dry the sweat is to simply run very cold. The "wicking" didnt work right, I was just more wet than ever because I wore so much more. At least with t-shirt and jacket there is this air pocket inside the jacket that can let sweat evaporate and you can then release it by just opening the jacket.
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>>718775
being fat would make him feel colder in the winter, as he has a bigger surface area
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>>719996
Yeah I do see junk bikes for commutes, but having tyres more expensive than the bike itself sounds a little off. Still trying to decide if I should get them or not.
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>>704198
Take the bus in the winter.

If I really have to bike, I use my heavier mountain bike with fat knobbly tires instead of my usual commuter.
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>>709317
>>709347
>>713022
>>713144

I ride winters in NYC, used to ride winters in Montreal... you fuckers are crazy.

For those who don't know: In Winnipeg, I've had spit literally freeze before it hit the ground. Last time I was in Calgary, one of my eyelids froze shut; on a 20 minute walk.
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>>720137
Why? Better tires are invariably the easiest way to improve handling and efficiency.
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>>721258
Decided to just go with it after first snowfall in sept (what the heck canada). I took the public transit for two days and I'm starting to miss the bike.

pic related, snowed, melted, froze over and now its melting again with more snow coming down
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>>722264
Some of the early season wet snows are easy to ride without studded tires if it is just slushy and not icy.
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hey y'all, i have an old fixed gear that i use all year for commuting downtown and plan on using it during the winter. the only issue i have is that the wheel size is fairly skinny at 700x26

i'm having trouble finding studded tires for this size so I guess what I'm asking is, is it necessary? can I use a different size? i live in Toronto and bike to work every day
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>>722277
Yeah your wheel will be fine with fatter tires, get like 35c-40c. Maybe you can go narrower, idk, let someone else answer that. But if it's just for winter commuting there isn't any real reason to go narrow. I have 40c Marathon Mondials and they are good in winter and summer. Slow, but not much issue for winter commuting.

Look at your wheel for the inner rim width (likely 622x18 or something like that) and pic related tells you what size tires you can use with that rim width
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>>722277
>using studded tires for winter
That's so mainstream
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>>722277
Also why the fuck do you want a fixie during winter? I hope you at least have brakes
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>>722283
b-but sheldon said more torke is more good
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>>722280
Thanks! your information and the picture are very helpful.

>>722283
It's an inexpensive bike and fits my day to day life very well. And yes I have brakes on my bicycle
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>>722286
>It's an inexpensive bike and fits my day to day life very well. And yes I have brakes on my bicycle
Why don't you just say I like fixies period. That excuse is lame as fuck.

Old 10 speed is cheaper and more efficient.

>MUH MAINTENANCE
Then walk.
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>>722287
>MUH MAINTENANCE
Kek. My hipster roommate always say that but we go to the same LBS and pay same price.

>MUH LESS MOVEABLE PARTS
My 30 decade old ten speed still have its original parts. It's built like a tank.
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>>722287
I literally paid 30 dollars for my bike, a friend was moving away and gave me a great deal. If you can find me a 10 speed for 30 bucks that's great

I like this bike and have fun with it. What does it matter to you what I'm riding? I'm just asking a question here about winter tires

Jesus Christ. The next time I post on this board about my bike, I wont even bring up the gearing on my bike if it isn't relevant so this conversation doesn't even come up
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>>722289
>I like this bike and have fun with it.
That's what I wanted to hear. End of discussion

It's just because some people will see your post and think that fixies are good commute bikes which they aren't. Yes you can commute with it but it's going to be a shit commute.

Also if it's just for fun >>>/toy/ >>>/asp/
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>>722288
>30 decade old
lol
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>>722296
>not riding the dandy horse
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>>722293
fair enough, that's understandable
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>>722277
If you're riding on pavement which isn't icy but has a little bit of snow on it, narrow tires do just fine and actually work quite well because they do well at cut through the crust of snow to reach the pavement beneath. Once there's ice or more than a little snow, riding on narrow tires is possible, but it's not easy and requires practice to pull off (if you can skid stop on your fixie you're probably close to having the balance and handling skills already).
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>>722264
Iktfb. Hoping that the snow is gone tomorrow so I can bike.
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currently riding a fixed kilo tt but i will have to ride in the snow this winter

one of my housemates offered me a rigid 29er with disc brakes for $150, should i pull the trigger? pretty sure its aluminum also so i wont have to worry about my kilo rusting. wasnt sure if a knobby wide tired ss mtb would be better than a fixed because i didnt know how the tires meet the snow

i might buy his 29er anyway since thats a sweet deal
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>>705593
Not the guy you replied to but Montreal here. Any Habs here btw?
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>>719996
Just joining this thread, I'm getting a old rigid Nishiki mountain bike ready for winter, are fenders a good idea or not?
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>>722490
Do you really need /n/'s blessing to do what you know you should?
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>>722608
Fenders are definitely a good idea if you're going to ride on a roadway during winter, to keep filthy, salty slush off yourself and your bike. Just be careful to install the fenders with more clearance than is usual, if they sit too close to the tires then they can trap heavy snow and make riding impossible.
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>>720094
Yeah, that's how it works...
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New commuter here too,

I've got an 80's road bike in good shape and a decent hard tail MTB, which will be better for commuting on?

The road bike will obviously ride faster, but the MTB has a much wider gear range. Also I'm not sure but does the road bike need to have any sort of frame mounts to add fenders or will they just clip on somewhere?
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>>704211
Athletic clothes and breathable poly works well, but wool is good because it's comparatively cheap. And wool socks are awesome.
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>>704211
>Pump your tires more full than normal because air compresses when it gets cold.

No. No, no, no.

You commute in winter the same way you CX in winter: get your tire's PSI as low as you possibly can while still keeping the bead on the rim. This means you get more traction for your bike, especially if your bike can fit a wider tire with a heavy tread made for mud or ice.

However, don't expect to do any hopping off curbs or perform any hard turns without completely fucking up your rims. You're also not going to go very fast because you're going to have a very high amount of traction, but when you're riding in the winter as a commuter, fast isn't always good.
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>>723726
>wool comparatively cheap
>vs polyester
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>>722555
Habs fans are everywhere. I'm in Vancouver, rain season is coming, ride year round, coldest is usually just a week or 2 at sub 0. Go Habs Go!
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>>722289
>I wont even bring up the gearing on my bike if it isn't relevant
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>>723583
1. Depends on the exact models being compared, but generally speaking a MTB is better than a road bike in winter conditions: on slick surfaces you'll benefit from having a lower center of gravity, less distance from the saddle to the ground (easier to put a foot down), clearance for wider tires, and lower gearing comes in handy when you're trying to churn your way up an icy slope that's covered in snow.
2. If your road bike doesn't have eyelets for mounting fenders, yes, there is such a thing as clip-on fenders (SKS raceblade is the best kind).
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Holy piss. Nobody mentioned petroleum jelly.

If you're dealing with genuinely dangerous winter conditions, any exposed skin (or skin that could become exposed) can benefit from a liberal application of petroleum jelly. Insulates the skin's heat and moisture.
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>>722645
If those fenders in your pic are aluminum, and made in Germany, I've got a set just like them.
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I'm not crazy about the idea of putting my relatively good mountain bike through winter salt BS.
I've got a crappy grocery store mountain bike and spare parts to upgrade it. I'm not crazy about bikes made of gaspipe, but for winter would it work?
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Anyone know how a long bike/xtracycle would work in winter?
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>>722264
nothing beats knobbies designed for muddy trails, in slush. You get better traction than the cars.

Bonus to slush-cycling: it's the only mode of transport where you can arrive with dry feet.
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>>723916
>I'm not crazy about the idea of putting my relatively good mountain bike through winter salt BS.
I've tried riding in salty slush maybe three times, and every time the bike got totally covered in salt corrosion.

the best thing to do if you must ride in salty snow,,, is get a disposable bike.
go buy a $100-$150 POS at wal-mart, get it adjusted enough to work, and just expect it to look like crap in 1 month. ride it until it don't work no more, then get another (you might get 2-3+ years of winters out of it).

it is a waste of time trying to ride a nice bike in salt, and keep it from rusting. you would need to spend 30 minutes every day spraying it off and re-lubing it all, and it's still going to get rusted and pitted all over. it's just not gonna work, and there's nothing you can do that will change that.
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>>723955
I've already got a shit bike, so it is worth it to just trash garbage. Looks don't matter as everything I have already looks like a bin full of ass.

>you would need to spend 30 minutes every day spraying it off and re-lubing it all, and it's still going to get rusted and pitted all over. it's just not gonna work, and there's nothing you can do that will change that.

Yeah... Not gonna happen, trashing a already trashed pile of ass it is!
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>>723951
>nothing beats knobbies designed for muddy trails, in slush. You get better traction than the cars.
Not the person you're responding too. I have some studded tires, but their fairly slick, would having a second wheel set with heavy lugs be a good idea?
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>>724894
They're*
Don't mind me, I'm just retarded.
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>>723955

I think it's possible.. I ride my ~$4k steel frame mountain bike year round, and we have 7 months of winter with huge amounts of road salting.. It will take a long time to rust enough to break a frame, and most components are aluminum which doesn't rust but can corrode and pit to an extent.

Anyway, pretty much all the moving parts, all the bearings can just be rebuilt, repacked with new grease. without much difficulty and a few proper tools you're ready to go for at least a few months in the harshest conditions... all this assuming high quality components, they tend to be very well sealed.

A ride I did several months ago involved riding in a creek, knees to waist deep.. I figured I needed to rebuild or whatever anyway.. but I get around to checking my bottom bracket, bearings, and shit this week and there's only the slightest moisture even after full submersion.

Get a good bike, have amazing handling during the winter, get some tools, and learn how to take care of your ride.

Then again, most of my winter riding is in fresh snow, but the salty slush is inevitable in a city ride, so get fenders!! or make custom ones like mine, pic related. The closer to the wheel you mount the fender the better the coverage.. gotta keep the crap off your sliding parts, like the fork stanchions for long service lives.

Dropper posts are also goddamn amazing for winter. Nice and high for efficiency, and you can get low real quick for descents and corners.
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I ride my velomobile, which is a 3 wheeled streamlined triycle. It is all human powered and weights about 30 kg's. Yes, it is heavy, but you can go a lot faster than a traditional bicycle, except when you go on hills. My top speed is 75 kilometers an hour in one. They are not even that expensive compared to some high end road bikes. You can get starter velomobiles for 3000 euro's.

Pros:
Comfy and warm in the winter
You don't get wet in the rain
Huge stability
Higher top speed
Better recumbent position, which is easier on the heart and lungs.
It has a detachable roof, that can be put on when raining.
Cars have a lot more respect for you.
You can sleep in one of them.

cons:
Harder to start, because of the weight
Slow pace getting on hills (but very, very high speed downhill, which is a pro ofcourse)
Gathers a lot of attention (which is a pro for some, con for others)
Harder to store

It is a perfectly alternative to a car for many situations, and that is what I use it for.
Watch the video (or skip it) and you will see the high speeds the rider is getting in it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwMnhbNAne0
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>>725430
Inside view of a velomobile
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>>725430

Is that really yours? Do you have more pictures?
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>>725430

Very nice. Is it really possible to sleep in there? Where do you put your legs when sleeping? And how much space for cargo is there?

And 30kgs doesn´t sound that bad. I had touring setups that weighted more when loaded and hills weren´t much of a problem even then. How hard is it to pedal a velomobile "full force", like you do when standing up on a road bike?
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>>725430
But how do you lock it
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>>725430
These are awesome, I tried one when I was in the netherlands. Really comfy, feels like you could ride forever in one and once you get up to speed they are very fast because of aerodynamics.

BUT they're only useful if you live somewhere with very good cycling infrastructure and very good roads in general. As soon as you have to get up or down a curb with one of these or make tight turns or get through tight spots you're screwed. You basically have to ride the thing like a car, if you ride it like a bike you will get stuck. So that means constantly being on the road and pissing off car drivers. This works in countries like the Netherlands where acceptance for cycling is high but I'd be scared shitless to ride one of these in the US.
The US is extremely hostile towards bikes as it is (except for Portland maybe) and these take up more space and get more attention and are not as agile as a regular bike. So if some car driver decides to ram you off the road you're screwed.

In a perfect world, they'd be the perfect vehicles for individual transport though. Add an electric motor if you're lazy and you don't even have to break a sweat. Plus they solve the age old argument against cycling "what do I do if it rains or snows".
>>
>>725430
I would pay money to see you try to commute in that thing after a good snow here (northern canada) especially after a plow leaves a foot high ridge of compacted snow chunks.
>>
>>725652
Aluminum single speed cyclocross bikes ftw on winter!
>>
>>725469
Cargo wise? Well it depends on the type of velomobile. The Mango has large load capacity.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65ssP0vJ5s4

Winter
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CrOHt7WsUNQ

With the carbon hood, which makes it look even more futuristic and gives extra protection against the elements.

And because of your laid back position, you push yourself against the chair when going up hills/speeding. Climbing hills is that hard, but you just have to do it in a very low gear and a slow speed.

PIC is my mango velomobile with the hood and the custom flames ;-). It costed me about 3000 euro's (second hand) and new they go for 6000.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n8Cau6ZlO-0
>>
Oh, I forgot to say the video's aren't mine of course, but I do now the guy from the internet. He also has a Mango and he is from Australia, just thought I'd say.
>>
>>725533
You are right about using it as a car. It is possible to use it in a busy city, but in some situations unpractical, yes.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDyLEj0t4us
>>
>>704198
>So with winter just around the corner, I was wondering what /n/ does to winterize your bikes, and keep warm during your commute.
>winterize your bike
the main thing is you clean out the freehub/freewheel and put oil in it instead of grease.
in cold weather the grease can get so thick that the pawls will not engage, and then you are walking

if you are just riding in extreme cold the above may be all you need.
if you are riding in snow/slush then you can also clean the grease/oil off your brake and shifter cables and lube them with dry teflon powder.

>keep warm
wear synthetic clothes only, no cotton at all. not even underwear or socks.
I don't like it personally but wool clothing is acceptable also.... some people do like it and it does not soak up moisture like cotton does.

,,,,,

I had studded tires once and didn't find them much help, TBH. on clean ice they would help a lot, but on packed/broken up snow they don't do anything better than regular knobbies do
>>
>>725926
What about silicone lube? Is that good for a lot of snow and potential dirty slush?
>>
>>726105
and by lube, I mean grease. Since I don't have silicone spray on me.
>>
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>>725926
Be careful not to put too much oil in the freehub. I did it once after having the pawl freeze in the disengaged position.

I put too much synthetic motor oil in there, which leaked into the axle bearings turning the bearing grease into a soup which eventually leaked out itself. Then the bearings stopped rolling.
>>
>>725926

> I had studded tires once and didn't find them much help, TBH. on clean ice they would help a lot, but on packed/broken up snow they don't do anything better than regular knobbies do.

That's pretty obvious, studs only help on ice they do nothing for snow. If you want better snow performance you need to find a tire with the longest knobs possible... I have some with 9mm knobs and they're wicked. Wide spacing also helps a lot.

Some good snow tires I've tried include maxxis medusa, arrow racing mud-x, and schwalbe dirty dan's. The schwalbe ice spiker pro's are pretty good in snow, but not nearly as good as the freeride dirt dan's. Amazing on ice though.
>>
what's the best mechanical disk these days?
>>
>>729193

Supposedly BB7's, but hydraulic is far superior for winter. You can get some new deore hydraulics that perform quite well for like $100 a set.
>>
>>729193

Mechs are shit.
>>
>>729193
I haven't tried Avid BB7's, but I just got a pair of TRP Spyre's and they are fantastic for mech. I used BB5's before and they were horribad
>>
>>729193
BB7's are the tits. I'm riding them now and they are so smooth.
Negatives are they are a bitch to dial in if you forget your tool, and you can feel fucking everything. I mean EVERYTIHNG. they are damn sensitive.
>>
Pretty rough. I'll usually have to add a jacket. Last winter I even added pants at one point. But I survived.
>>
Pogies
Bar Mitts
Merino base layers and socks
Fleece midlayer
Softshell outer layer
Goretex for the snowpocalypse
Disc brakes
Internal hub
Chain wax
Fenders
Relaxed geometry (think cyclocross or hybrid)
Winter tires (studded or extra grippy low tpi/psi)
Balaclava or face mask
Toque under helmet
Less vented helmet (think Bern)
Goggles/xc ski glasses
Winter boots/cycling shoes.
Shoe covers
Coffee cup/thermos holder on handle bars.
Grow a beard
Stop shaving your legs

Fat bike for off road adventures
Clean your bike often, unless you want to buy a whole new drivetrain every season.

/tips
>>
If the winter where I live is pretty much only rain

Is the maintenance that much more?

Like just like some fenders, rain pants, shoe covers and a rain jacket right?

That's all I will need?
>>
>>723764
why are you not calling ut vaseline. nerd
>>
>>729349
Vaseline is a brand name.
>>
>>729346
if possible lube every exposed metalthat can rust , like lines etc. (except disks, rims )and use some good chain lube designed for watery enviroment like green finishline. Also its good to put some good wax on the bike .
>>
>>722645

she's a beaut
>>
>>729244
wouldsticky/10
>>
bump so thread sticks around until it maxes out
>>
>>729765

You do want to lube your rims, or rather around the nipples threads and rim holes for easy truing later. I use linseed oil.

Obviously need to be careful doing this with rim brakes however..
>>
>>704198
I'm honestly impressed with the lengths you guys have to go to in winter.
I'm in Australia so winter is just sometimes having to wear a bandanna to keep the wind out of your ears. In fact its the best time of year to cycle for me because I'm not that good and the heat of summer is hellishly oppressive.
>>
>>733239

Fuck being over-hot.

I still bike in -45C / -49F with strong winds and it's possible and can be comfortable. Can always dress warmer, but theres only so much you can undress.. fuck 30C+ temps.

That said 7 months of winter can also suck, but Canada rules.
>>
Anyone try atv / motorbike hand guards or know if they would fit (maybe need shims for clamp)? Just blocking the wind from hitting your hands directly should keep them warmers. I've seen some on Amazon for around $15 which is a hell of a lot cheaper than pogies.
>>
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>>714917
I've tried Ice Spikers. I can corner or even briefly use the front brakes on ice without going full Bambi.

OTOH the rolling is as bad as it looks. I'm thinking of getting Schwalbe winter and canobalizing some of the Spikers studs to make it full winter marathon.
>>723728
>when you're riding in the winter as a commuter, fast isn't always good
FOR YOU! :D
>>
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>>736486
just stick a couple two-litres on there if you want cheap
>>
Why the fuck do you guys need spikes and all that shit? I have 40c Marathon Mondials and they work perfectly fine for winter. I even rode in a few inches of fresh snow, and yeah they slid a lot but it was fun as fuck.
>>
>>736715
fresh snow isn't the problem, it's the ice and shit underneath.
>>
>>736716
Yet my Marathon Mondials handle that just fine.
>>
>>736717
nah.
you've got a dry winter, is all.
>>
>>704198
How does this guy in OP's picture manage to ride in the snow with road bike tires?? It's so goddamn slippery, I have to use my mountainbike when there is snow.
>>
>>736715
>slid a lot but it was fun as fuck
Not as fun when you're cornering on a busy intersection with several ton truck right behind you and you're not sure if the asphalt is just wet or ice.
>>
>>736728
having a fender gives +1d4 equipment bonus to traction
>>
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>>736715
Freezing rain, or you get a chinook in mid January. Imagine trying to ride on a skating rink, only the rink has slopes, or you want to turn suddenly.
>>
>>736736
>+1d4

What you mean ?
>>
>>736824
A +1 chance on a 4 sided dice roll.

It's a joke about tabletop games.
>>
>>736827
...that's not what that means

it means a bonus of a roll of a d4 to the check, so anywhere from 1 to 4
>>
>>736830
Oh, my mistake. I don't have much experience with roleplaying games in either case.

I'm more of a battletech guy.
>>
>>736819

So get BETTER studded tires. Schwalbe Ice Spiker Pro Evo's will allow you to do hard turns on pure fucking ice. Off camber ice no problem either. 361 studs and you can handle any ice condition.
>>
>>736715

As soon as you hit a smooth patch of ice, you will fall and you will feel pain. Then you install spiked tires
>>
>>736718
>Minneapolis
>dry winter
Alright m8.
>>736844
It would have happened already. I ride a lot.
>>
>>736903
>rides a lot
>has never hit ice

sounds like a dry winter to me
>>
>>736733
Of course, but that was just immediately after a snow storm. Almost no one rides in those conditions, I'm pretty sure I was the only one out, and this was Minneapolis where there are a fuck of a lot of cyclists. Sure, get a fat bike or spiked tires or whatever for the day of the snowstorm, but for the other 96% of the winter, you really don't need them, even if there is snow and ice. The only time I was sliding was right after a snowstorm before anything was plowed when even cages had a very difficult time.
>>736819
Sure, spikes might be useful a few days a year for a few hours if it's right after freezing rain or whatever, but certainly not the whole winter. Patches of ice don't warrant spikes.
>>
>>736905
U wot m8? Of course I've hit ice. Many times. Never once did it cause me to fall.
>>
>>736907

Your winter is like our early summer in Alberta. You need good studded tires when you have to deal with 20+ degree temperature swings. The slushy ruts freeze up and turn into an icey hellscape. Basically you have to ride on a shitty ice lasagna that looks like this: pavement -black ice - shitty compacted foot snow - more ice ruts - fresh snow - and an icey crust to top it all off. Riding fresh snow with ice underneath is nothing, it's the off camber ice ruts that will mess you up.
>>
>>705593
Minneapolis resident here as well.
The salt here is indeed ridiculous, my commuter was half the bike it used to be after the winter from all the grit and crap that piled up on it.

If your commute is a few miles, it might be worth it to consider getting a winter specific junker that can be tossed once winter is done/kept until next season. I picked up someone's poorly modded rockhopper for $25 at an abandoned bike sale. Turned out to have studded tires, so that alone was totally worth it.
>>
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>>736951
South of the Province sounds like Grand Prairie area. Guess we all go through the same shitty weather.
>>
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>>722288
>>722298
>30 decades
My sides
>>
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I want to try this out someday.
>>
>>737617
All I can see when I look at that is hitting a solid chunk of ice, a branch, or anything and going over the bars.
>>
So, for gloves/hand protection, i was thinking some kind of liner, with some half finger cycling gloves over top, since my fingers will be tucked under the bars 99% of the time. Does this sound feasible? and what material would be good for the liners, merino wool, or something synthetic?
>>
>>736715

>Why the fuck do you guys need spikes and all that shit?
>I even rode in a few inches of fresh snow
>a few inches of fresh snow

where the fuck do you live, Atlanta or something? Some places have harsh winters.
>>
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>not heeding the bicycle no-ride times
>>
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>>740881
>tfw commiefornia
>>
>>741432
>commiefornia
Why do people even say that? California barely leans to the left on policies.
>>
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>>741453
It's a cool même, cher frere.
Besides, it's best to just go with it.
>>
>>741453
Ya because when a State pays it's employees in IOUs, there is nothing wrong at all.
>>
>>741453
Communism has nothing to do with left versus right, dumbass.
>>
>>704198
just cycle? take it a bit slow, and anticipate corners and other traffic, by keeping distance and slowing down when nearing others/corners.

it's not that hard. i've driven snow my whole life.
>>
>>736907

There are different instances of ice. I had a very, very well regarded set of Schwalbe mountain bike tires and a 26" mountain bike worth over 1300$. I saw that a large puddle of water had frozen over ahead of me and I had NO time to brake or avoid.

The ice was a LOT smoother than ice is on lakes, hockey rinks or actually anywhere else. It was the perfect storm, like it was machined with precision. So I just rode through it, consciously not doing ANY turning or EVEN pedaling. Just trying to go balanced and smooth, like an aeroplane that has run out of fuel and is gliding to safety.

It was all for nothing. Front tire held on barely, but as soon as my rear tire came in contact with the ice, the bike just removed itself from under me. There was no "sliding" or "slipping". It was just like a bike would fall over when it was standing still and you let go of it.

No amount of skill would've saved me. I fell hard and since the traction did not exist to slow down the fall even horizontally, I came down right on my ass. Couldn't sit for a couple of days, but luckily didn't break anything.

I've ridden over ice before, but not such smooth ice. Black ice on roads can be dealt with, but not this.

At that moment I promised myself to use studded tires when it's winter. End of discussion.

tl;dr, you haven't experienced winter like it is portrayed in Seasons Greetings postcards
>>
>>741542
Holy shit lol
>>
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>>741542
can you try harder
>>
>>704726

>Ive been looking for people to ride.

ftfy
>>
just bumping because it's starting to get cold as fuck
>>
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It's a curse to have fingers and feet with bad circulation. I normally get cold feet and fingers sitting in my room during summer.

Went out for 2 hour ride at 0C and even layering gloves it was painful. Broke in my studs, ready to go. No, I am not a hipster. It was just the best condition bike in the co-op.
>>
>>744158
>It's a curse to have fingers and feet with bad circulation.
eat more garlic
>>
>>744158
>bianchi
>steel
>flatbars
>old
fucking hipster
>>
>>704198
>keep warm during your commute

gotta go fast !
>>
>>704198
That's a picture of me! :D
>>
>>744312
timestamp the bike
>>
>>744316
Can't... It dun got rekt this spring when I was right-hooked by an old cunt in a Cadillac. Broke my right collarbone, left ankle, and three ribs. Insurance paid all medical bills and paid for a new bike [a custom SS 'cross frame].
>>
>>740881

North Dakota here, its late october, biking is fine.

Theres a few I see regularly commute all throughout winter. Gonna go as long as I can, though, not a long commute. Sub 1 mile. Debating if thats worth it to get studs on my mtb. Trip is residential roads - > multiuse path - > bike lane.

Will easily make it to late november on my single speed.
>>
>>741593
>>741986
Are you fucking retarded? Left versus right is liberalism (true liberalism, i.e. anarchism) versus authoritarianism. It has fuck nothing to do with economics. Fucking kill yourself.
>inb4 you don't even realize that communism is an economic system, not a political/government system
>>
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>>744545

/pol/ pls go
>>
>>744553
>butthurt because I'm right
>>
>>744545
fuck off and fuck you
you are NOT going to shit up one of the only relatively cancer-free boards on this website
NOBODY CARES
GET OFF MY /n/
>>
since im a broke ass college student and dont have money for studded tires, and i dont really want to ruin the one nice pair of MTB tires i have doing some DIY studs. How well does the zip tie method work? is this something you can do on knobbies or is it restricted only to slicks/hybrid tires (since theyre usually smooth)

i need some input here because im not really finding much online
>>
>>744594
I saw a guy use zip ties at an ice race last year. Most broke off within a few laps. You might be able to find some cheap tires to stud. Walmart has some kevlar bead ones for $15. Or maybe check out online classifieds or even a scrap yard. A local metal recycling drop off point always has one or two cheap mountain bikes with taco'd wheels in the pile where the tires would be salvageable. Or fish an abandoned bike out of a ditch.
>>
>>744562
I didn't bring it up, fucktard. First someone else referred to California as commiefornia, then someone said that it doesn't make sense because California isn't left. Cry to them, not me. If people say stuff that is so blatantly false then I will call them out on it. If you don't like it, get the fuck out of 4chan. Free speech exists here, and that includes the right to tell people when they say something that is fucking moronic.

tl;dr kill yourself
>>
>>744782
/thread
>>
get a car.
>>
>>744793
Go home, /o/. You're lost.
>>
>>744793
I got some fancy new Hakka 8 tires for my car. Now I'll be able to do 330 km/h just like the advertisement. The combined cost of my bike winters tires still cost more, probably close to $1000.
>>
One of my biggest problems in cold weather is when I stop riding and go inside.

My ears start to ring, I get very cold and start shivering. Since it happens all the time I throw on a sweater immediately after changing to help minimize the discomfort.

I think the problem is that my stomach gets very cold while riding and when blood flow returns to normal that cold is carried throughout the body. I'm guessing its a mild form of hypothermia. I often wrap a scarf around my stomach in cold weather to keep it warmer without overheating my upper torso.
>>
>>744647
hmm, alright. ill have to scavenge for some sub optimal tires and see if i cant just do it that way. im not studding the maxxis ones i have but i might have some lying around somewhere
>>
Any tips for someone who has to keep their commuter in an unheated shack during the winter? I have lost the luxury of being able to haul it inside to defrost and dry over night.
>>
>>745178

I would invest in a solid wind breaker/ rain jacket. I ride in temperatures as low as -40C and can get away with just my jacket, long sleeve, and wool base layer.

Here is the jacket I use. It's pricy, but worth every penny.

http://www.mec.ca/product/5034-302/mec-revolution-jacket-mens/?h=10+50002+50020+50089+50122&f=10+50002+50021+50089
>>
>>745384
That might actually be better for it. When going from cold to warm you can get condensation in the interior cavities of the frame, hubs etc. I leave mine in an unheated garage all winter.


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