[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vip /vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y ] [Search | Home]
4Archive logo
/classical/
If images are not shown try to refresh the page. If you like this website, please disable any AdBlock software!

You are currently reading a thread in /mu/ - Music

Thread replies: 324
Thread images: 33
File: 1403325254530.png (2 MB, 1050x2270) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1403325254530.png
2 MB, 1050x2270
Discuss Classical Music. Favorite composers of late? What have you been listening to?

Also:
>last classical piece you listened to
>last non-classical song/piece you listened to

New to /classical/? Check the chart or pastebin: http://pastebin.com/SyY53wgT
>>
Why do you always use poly's shorty pastebin instead of those mega links with a fuck ton of classical?
Anyways, we symphony edition now.
Favorite 3 symphonies?
Mine are probably
>Beethoven 8
>Bruckner 8
>Brahms 4
>>
Based Larsson

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JGFyPGGqOfc
>>
>>48725139
>shorty
*shitty
Based auto correct.
>>
>>48725139
Those mega links are dope and should be included in all OPs

>Favorite 3 symphonies?
Probably Martin? 4, Mahler 5 and Martin? 1
>>
Bantock is an awesome composer. Check out his celtic symphony if you haven't.
>>
>>48725139
>Brian 1
>Shostakovich 4 or 10
>Peterson-Berger 5
In b4 tryhard.
>>
>>48725139
>Favorite 3 symphonies?

Mozart 35
Bruckner 7
Ives 4
>>
>>48725035
>last classical piece
Ryuichi Sakamoto - Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence (If that counts)
>non classical
The Lounge Lizards - Do The Wrong Thing
>>
>>48725139


>Beethoven 9
>Beethoven 8
>Mozart 38
>>
File: Tchaikovsky.jpg (49 KB, 350x473) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Tchaikovsky.jpg
49 KB, 350x473
This thread is dildos.
Who's your favorite Russian?
>>
>>48728012
Le Schnittke childish joy face
I still don't feel like I've even scratched the surface with Schnittke.

>>48725613
>Brian 1
Brian?
>>
>>48725139
Beet 3
Bruck 8
Mah 9
>>
>>48728012
Scriabin
>>
>>48728064
>Brian?

Havergal Brian I guess.
>>
>>48728012
Kalinnikov is pretty cool
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1hxzeX29MU
>>
>>48725139
Beethoven 8
Mozart 40
Beethoven 3

I'm a pleb, I know.
>>
>>48728012
Prokofiev.
>>
>>48728064

It's the "biggest" symphony ever made.

It's pretty good and incorporates a lot of stuff, but it's not as outstanding as other symphonies

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._1_%22The_Gothic%22_%28Brian%29
>>
>>48728248
Yeah I remember hearing about the "Gothic Symphony" Had forgotten the composers name though.

>All this Beethoven
He must have done something right.
>>
>you will never hear Richter do a full cycle of Beethoven's piano sonatas
Why bother with life?
>>
File: Alexander Borodin.jpg (18 KB, 220x303) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Alexander Borodin.jpg
18 KB, 220x303
>>48728012
Borordin, Scriabin, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Tchaivkosky
>>
>>48725139

Mendelssohn 5
Schubert 9
Beethoven 3,8 or 9 (can't decide)
>>
>>48728012

Scriabin, Rimsky-Korsakov and Rachmaninoff (le Rachmaninoff face)
>>
>>48728299

>tfw
>>
>>48725139
Ives Symphony No. 2
Yoshimatsu No. 4
Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 6
>>
Why does Sibelius get no love on this board?
His symphonic cycle is probably the greatest since beethoven's.
>>
>>48728012
Rachmaninov
>>48725035
Chopin Prelude No.15 "Raindrop"
Wolfmother -- Pyramid (came on Last.fm)
>>48728424
mfw Mahler
>>
>>48728424
Symphony 7 is great. I also really like Valse Triste.
>>
>>48728444
>mahler
He could've learned a thing or two from sibelius's economy.
>>
>>48728498
>mahler
>economy
>same sentence

Top kek m8

Out of curiosity, what's your favorite Sibelius symphony?
>>
File: 1391875369035.gif (1017 KB, 250x250) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1391875369035.gif
1017 KB, 250x250
>mfw first time listening to classical music in flac
It should be a crime to listen to it in mp3
>>
>>48728613
Try listening over a good stereo.
>>
>>48728613
>not listening to a real orchestra
Listening to classical on speakers should be a crime
>>
>>48728638
>not just reading the score
Listening to classical should be a crime,
>>
>>48728638
>>48728653
>>48728637
Cancerous posts are cancerous
>>
>>48728653
>not just reading partbooks and reconstruct the score in your head
Pleb these days
>>
what does /classical/ think of Joshua Bell?
>>
>>48728688
>Silent read through master race
muh performers ruining everything with their "interpretations"
>>
>>48728688
>not just reading the diary of the composer, psychoanalyzing his state of mind, and inferring his subsequent composition
>>
>>48728699
I think I don't know who he is
>>
What's a great complete cycle of Prokofiev symphonies please?
>>
>>48728699
Saw him once live doing Tchaikovsky's concerto, thought he was shite
>>
File: Furtwangler.jpg (92 KB, 623x837) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Furtwangler.jpg
92 KB, 623x837
>>48728680
Good post.
>>
>>48728565
As much as I loathe it, his formula of sweltering brass bombast mixed with a half a movement's worth of saccharine string shriek navel gazing seems to have been a hit.

Favorite Sibelius is either 4 or 7 depending on the weather.
>>
I like Frederick Delius, Claude Debussy, Erik Satie, Alexander Scriabin, Charles Griffes, and Maurice Ravel. Recommend me stuff.
>>
>>48728762
>Furtwangler

Niggas with taste
>>
>>48728783
lol.
>>
>>48728737
some guy that owns a Stradivarius

>>48728757
I saw him live, too, a year ago in Nashville
he seemed pretty good to me, maybe not the best, but I also don't get to listen to live recordings that much since they're so expensive
>>
What's your favorite piano concerto? I'm looking for something new and piano is my favorite instrument.
>>
>>48728774
>>
>>48728834
Tchaikovsky 1, Chopin 1
>>
>>48728834
K.459
>>
>>48728747
Listen to Lieutenant Kije and Alexandra Nevsky

>>48728728
2meta

>>48728767
Sibelius is based, I need to listen to more.

>>48728774
Vaughan Williams, Grieg, Janá?ek , Martin?
>>
>>48728774
Schoenberg Verklarte Nacht
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-pVz2LTakM
Schubert Impromptu in G-Flat Major
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8DKaq3njtwQ
Chopin Etude No.3 in E Minor (bullshit clapping skiped)
http://youtu.be/VC3XIg6cDI8?t=1m33s
Beethoven Piano Sonata No.29 Hammerklavier
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qzDUOiyYz0
>>
>>48728834
>Piano Concertos
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XmIy-zHG528
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-9sqT-2f7S4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2GGx8TRWFVA
>>
>>48728834
Rachmaninov 4ever
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWOWb3xtfGE&list=PL3D3AB1402EEB1D8C&index=1
>>
>>48728864
>Listen to Lieutenant Kije and Alexandra Nevsky

I've heard both and like them quite a lot, but that's not what I asked.
>>
>>48728424

Sibelius is great. I like his 2nd, 5th and 7th symphonies.

Also his Karelia Suite and Pelleas et Melissande suite (still can't decide whether I prefer Sibelius' or Faure's though. I'm more familiar with Sibelius', but I have a feeling that Faure's will usurp it)
>>
>>48728699

I'm not a huge fan. I think he's one of those overrated soloists. Definitely a good player, but I don't think he deserves as much attention as he gets
>>
>>48728834

Try any of Scriabin's works for orchestra and piano.

Also Saint-Saens' 5th, Schumann's and Grieg's. And Liszt's concerti (and Totentanz, which is my favourite Liszt)

For something a bit more modern, try Arvo Part's Lamentate and James Macmillian's "The Beserking"
>>
>last classical
http://open.spotify.com/track/0RPIQUVRe8VypIKbIHudD1
Thomas Tellefsen - III Scherzo. Presto
my favorite chamber piece ever.
>last non-classical
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_QMS3-WAN0
Odd Nosdam
>>
/classical/ loves Scriabin. Is he well known elsewhere or is he mainly ours? How about Arensky?
>>
>>48729068
Scriabin is as much /classical/'s as NMH is /mu/'s.
>>
>>48729068
I always promote Arensky. He's fucking based.
>>48728774
would probably enjoy this too

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=229sLFw-UPc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IVj3TBd0TU
>>
>>48729068
I think those that love Scriabin are either a) pianists (it's his pianistic repertoire that's often discussed) or b) people who are enamored with the idea of loving Scriabin (sooo psychedelic! amiright joerogan dude bro!???). Because the quality of his orchestral output is quite low in proportion to the acclaim it receives here.
>>
>>48729098
That seems like an apt way to put it.
>>
Tonight's Prom:

War Elegy - Gurney
The Singing - Sally Beamish
Symphony No. 1 in B-flat minor - Walton

A bit of an odd prom this evening. It was meant to be tied in to the centenary of the start of WWI, with Gurney's War Elegy and a new violin concerto by Beamish which drew upon WWI for inspiration (but due to performer illness, they've switched out the violin concerto with her other work) with the Walton as a big symphony by a British composer to round it all off.

The replacement Beamish piece is in fact an accordion concerto which muses upon the Highland Clearances in which Scottish clansmen were cleared off their land as a result of their support for the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745. It promises to be an interesting piece (even if I'm not Beamish's biggest fan, having premiered some of her stuff before and not being overawed by it)

The Gurney elegy is lovely though, and the Walton is pretty much a Sibelius-Beethoven crossbreed.
>>
>>48729195
Some are even impressed by his esoteric bullshit.
>>
>>48725139
I try not to encourage piracy too terribly as I'm more or less against it.
Anyways:
Shostakovich 4
Beethoven 7
Turangalila
>>
>>48729195

Well my favourite Scriabin are his two "poems" (Poem of Ecstasy and Poem of Fire) which I think are wonderful compositions, if a little difficult to follow at times.
>>
>>48728783
When I got the Furtwangler Bayreuth recording of the ninth I was pretty happy until movement 3, but that shit is intolerable. Worse than listening on MP3s, but somehow more socially acceptable.
>>
>>48729195

Some of the shit Scriabin comes up with is pretty hilarious though

>The White Mass is closely related to its predecessor, the sixth sonata. Both works were written in 1911–12 and have structurally and stylistically more in common than any other pair of Scriabin sonatas. Scriabin reportedly feared the sixth sonata, considering the work to be corrupted by demonic forces and going so far as to refuse to play the work in public. Scriabin composed his seventh sonata as an exorcism against the darkness of the sixth sonata, subtitling the work White Mass in order to reflect its celestial nature.
>>
>>48729322

>>48729228
>>48729228
>>
>>48729068
I think he is one of the greatest composers for Piano, He started out as an amazing Chopin imitator then branched out in his own musical style.

He is better than Chopin in my opinion, and His Preludes, Etudes, and Sonatas, especially 4 and 5, are god tier.
>>
>>48728424
Sibelius is fucking rad.
>>
>>48729261
Just think of lo-fi aesthetic. It makes the music sound almost as old as it is and reminds you that all these guys are dead and gone.
>>
>>48729335

I'm not impressed, I just think it's funny

He's pretty much the Kanye of his era
>>
>>48729322
It was more normal to believe in dumb shit back then. That's pretty amusing, though.
>>
>>48729261
I don't why some people insist on ignoring recording quality when recommending certain interpretations for ordinary listening. As much as fury wangler occasionally impresses me (I'm not his biggest fan) there are moments when so much essential detail is brutalized by the state of recording technology (harmonies that qualify entire passages in the 2nd mov of eroica are erased in furtys recordings).
>>
>>48728699
"Meh" tier but I also hear that he's an asshole.
>>48728774
Milhaud, Poulenc, Saint Saens, Faure.
>>48728834
rach 3 XD
In all seriousness probably Beethoven's Emperor Concerto.
>>48729225
I've been meaning to listen to a recording of one of Walton's String Quartet in A Minor. Doing that now in prep.
>>
Top kek

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WSSucj6ZPGQ

Will Mozart ever stop being relevant?
>>
>>48729387
>It was more normal to believe in dumb shit back then.

You think it's any different today?
>>
FS Kelly: Australian/British composer who survived Gallipoli only to die in the Somme.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aK19TZfoHLo
>>
File: faggot.jpg (243 KB, 611x450) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
faggot.jpg
243 KB, 611x450
>>48729237
>I try not to encourage piracy
>>
>>48729470
In my mind I don't see any value in it. It's only particularly useful when dealing with sketchy ECM or Hyperion releases.
>>
>>48729502
Or when the performer is dead.
>>
>>48729535
That's not necessarily true, though.
>>
>>48729470
>not supporting classical music performers
a lot of them need every penny they can get, particularly performers of early music and other obscure things in general
>>
I'm not sure of whether I belong here on /classical/

you guys seem very dedicated, and probably study music as well
I merely put on the radio on my country's public classical station and listen away maybe an hour a day. if I like it, I just download whatever interpretation I find later.

btw favorites are:
Villalobos, Jet whistle
Henri Dutilleux anything for solo piano, maybe Rèsonances
Janacek string quartets

cheers
>>
>>48729585

>Janacek string quartets

Good taste
>>
>>48729585
>Dutilleux solo piano
good fakin' taste.
>>48729602
also this

All are welcome here.
>>
>>48729585
>you guys seem very dedicated

Most people on here are pretenders and bullshitters. Don't feel intimidated.
>>
>>48729352
But I was supposed to have grown out of Pavement! Actually I quite like vinyl fuzz and antiquarianism, it's just that when I know what it's supposed to sound like the contrast is miserable. Mainly for the slow movement, the rest can get by on big drum sounds and scale.

>>48729388
This is one of the things I find funny about reading dedicated classical forums. Like people sucking Caruso's dick then having to fall back on anecdotes from other dudes who actually heard the fucker sing.
>>
>>48729585
>you guys seem very dedicated, and probably study music as well
lyl
>>
>>48729602
>>48729616
>>48729627
thanks :')
>>
>>48729585
I haven't played an instrument or studied theory in years, and even then I wasn't that great at it
but if you ever take a liking to medieval and renaissance music, though, I'll be glad to get you started, just note that I'm no scholar, just a devoted fan

>>48729388
I find something very charming about old recordings, I can't explain what it is, and if I want to really understand a piece, then a high quality recording is the way to go, but I guess it's just sort of like being a silent film enthusiast
>>
>>48729388
Because recommending pre-50's recordings makes you seem knowledgable.
>>
>>48729195
Lots of piano fans around, he's definitely more of a pianist's kind of composer and not very well known otherwise. I guess if we had organists around instead people would be talk of widor rather than Scriabin
>>
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/03/books/review/beethoven-by-jan-swafford.html

"When Swafford described the middle movement of the “Appassionata” as “somber,” I threw the book on the floor, Beethoven-style. The piece is the opposite of gloomy; its gesture, its reason for being, is to reach up in a gradual arc toward elation. "

literally fucking dropped.
>>
>>48729888

Widor and Reger would both get more love if we had more organists about.

Widor is pretty great though
>>
It's no wonder the bulk of /mu/ doesn't delve into classical. First you've got to select a composer out of hundreds of years, then his numbered mostly unnamed compositions, then a performer with a good interpretation, then you've got to consider recording quality on top of that.
>>
>>48729388
Sound quality is easier to reconstruct in your head than trying to make up for a poor interpretation. Sound really has to be wretched for me to take it as a big minus.
>>
>>48729927
Its no wonder people happily spend their lives just listening to classical. So much to check out
>>
>>48729927
And at the heart of that, a lot of /mu/ probably doesn't like music enough to justify such effort.
>>
>>48729927
Finding the best recordings of a particular work is one of the great things about listening to and collecting classical music.
>>
I'm actually considering buying Celibidache's recordings of the Bruckner symphonies while being on a tight budget... please talk me out of it!
>>
>>48730024
Depending on your budget there are FAR better things you can buy!
What's the budget
>>
>>48729925
Never really bothered with either. Not the biggest fan of the instrument tbh
>>
Since we're speaking of Scriabin, who are your favorite pianists/recordings for him?
>>
>>48730024
>Celibidache's recordings of the Bruckner symphonies
Reason enough not to do it.
Y'know, unless you want to die of old age.
>>
>>48730041
I really shouldn't spend so much money on CD's... but I can't stop buying. I already have tons of Bruckner on CD but still the Celi boxed-set seems tempting...
>>
>>48730024

no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no no

Have a listen to this and then consider it a reason never to think about Celi Bruckner ever again

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yLGS4nJy070
>>
File: cover.jpg (70 KB, 500x496) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
cover.jpg
70 KB, 500x496
>>48730024
Why not buy his masses instead?
>>
>>48730094
I shouldn't be spending so much money on CD's and downloads either, but it's best to put the money to good use if you're going to spend it.
Maybe Andras Schiff's Diabelli Variations? Or his Janacek CD?
>>
>>48730118
Don't care for Janacek. I have the complete Mozart piano concertos by Schiff but hardly ever listen to those recordings...
>>
File: MI0001028809.jpg (43 KB, 500x493) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
MI0001028809.jpg
43 KB, 500x493
>>48730178
Buy this and then upload it to the internet so I don't have to.
>>
>>48730024
Only the early symphonies are somewhat passable, in general he's so slow what you get is a deconstruction of Bruckner rather than proper interpretations. Masses of sound with no sense of the line.

Besides, iirc the cycle is fucking costly, don't waste your money on that trash, or at the very least sample it beforehand. Also, he might be dead but his estate probably get a money and he was a bigoted asshole. Wouldn't want to give him any of my hard earned money even in the grave.
>>
>>48730231
Don't care for J.S. Bach either. I just bought the three volumes of keyboard concertos of C.P.E. by Michael Rische though, riveting stuff.
>>
>>48730233
>he was a bigoted asshole

how's that please? i don't really care much about artist's personalities in gereral. he could've been a nazi for all i care.
>>
>>48730259
There was a recent set of CPE's Complete Piano Works. Super approved.
http://www.classicstoday.com/review/markovina-aces-cpe-bach-plus-25-greatest-hits-score/
>>
>>48730233
>Besides, iirc the cycle is fucking costly

I always go for the bargains mate, secondhand and all.
>>
>>48729925
I've only been around here for a few days, but I'm quite partial to the organ
not so familiar with it in later classical music, but here's the first video in a series of a collection of early organ music that I'm a huge fan of
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkVL4QLlAfA

Conrad Paumann and Francesco Landini are some of my favorite early organ composers. It's strange that they're both blind, isn't it?
>>
>>48730305
Yeah, I put in a bid for that on ebay not so long ago. But lost out. Retail price is too dear for me.
>>
>>48730288
I don't care when I listen, I care somewhat when I buy. Read about the Abbie Conant affair if you're interested.
>>
>>48730288

He was of the opinion that orchestras should be all-male (or at least that women should not be allowed to lead sections or have any leadership role in the orchestra). There was a controversy over his treatment over a female trombonist

http://www.osborne-conant.org/ladies.htm
>>
>>48730342
Sigh if we knew your budget it would help...
>>
>>48730365
It's not that I need to spend a certain amount of money on music & I want you to choose for me. I just wanted you to tell me how awful Celibidache's bruckner is. Thanks anyway though!
>>
>>48730357
To be fair this is (remarkably) still a problem to this day.
Karajan was actually a conductor who tried to fight against this.
>>
>>48730658
>Karajan was actually a conductor who tried to fight against this.

I think the whole Karajan-Berliner crisis in the 1980's had more to do with an orchestra rebelling against their somewhat autocratic leader than with the fact that they didn't want another lady in their ranks.
>>
>>48730711
IDK man, at least Karajan was trying to add female members.
>>
>>48728783
>listening to multiculturalists
>>
>Rameau on the accordion as a encore

I can dig this
>>
>>48730737
Read Robert Vaughan's book on Karajan. Good read, and goes into detail about the karajan-berliner crisis about the female... I forgot clarinetist?
>>
>>48730790
Yeah Sabine Meyer. Do you know the title?
>>
>>48730826
Herbert von Karajan: a biographical portrait by Roger (not Robert, sorry) Vaughan.
>>
>>48730737
>intentionally trying to add female members instead of just picking the best available regardless of sex.

And what a surprise that he's also shit.
>>
>>48730966
You obviously have no idea what you're talking about.
>>
>>48730966
You're probably trolling because Sabine Meyer is considered one of the greatest clarinetists ever. Certainly one of the greatest living.
>>
>>48730984
He's right about Karajan being trash though,
>>
>>48730966
According to all accounts Sabine Meyer was a great musician.
>>
>>48731012
Well yes nobody was contesting this.
>>48731013
Still is.
>>
>>48731012
lol.
>>
>>48731033
>Well yes nobody was contesting this.

You're right, why waste time & energy on educating hopeless plebs.
>>
>>48731100
What are you talking about?
>>
>>48731100
KIDF pls.
>>
>>48731106
According to you noone is contesting that 'Karajan is shit'. So I said: right, why waste time & energy on educating hopeless plebs.
>>
>>48731139
OK so you don't think Karajan is shit? I would disagree.
Just watch this interview with Simon Rattle; even he admits that he was a very controversial conductor: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ceXbC9SF1E
>>
>>48731168
Since when is Simon Rattle an authority on anything? Maybe Simon Rattle is shit? Ever thought about that?
>>
>>48731185
just stop b8ing
>>
>>48731198
Like I said, I'm not going to waste time & energy. All I can say is: listen to Herbie conduct R. Strauss, Bruckner or Brahms. If you still think he's shit then that's that. Nothing more to say. And obviously Karajan was a better conductor than Rattle ever will be, I don't see how this could even be a dispute. But, please carry on.
>>
>>48731259
>Karajan's Bruckner
>not shit
>>
>>48731259
I wasn't saying that Rattle was a spectacular conductor. But even he, on the Berlin Philharmonic's own YouTube channel, said that Karajan was not some flawless figure.
>>
>>48731401
So what? Who's flawless? I sure never said Herbie was flawless. But not being flawless means you're shit now? Come on.
>>
>>48729322
>tfw Scriabin
>"There will not be a single spectator. All will be participants. The work requires special people, special artists and a completely new culture. The cast of performers includes an orchestra, a large mixed choir, an instrument with visual effects, dancers, a procession, incense, and rhythmic textural articulation. The cathedral in which it will take place will not be of one single type of stone but will continually change with the atmosphere and motion of the Mysterium. This will be done with the aid of mists and lights, which will modify the architectural contours."
Scriabin intended the performance to be in the foothills of the Himalayas in India, a week-long event that would be followed by the end of the world and the replacement of the human race with "nobler beings".

Who the hell was his pharmacist?
>>
>>48731588
Hahaha
>>
>>48731401
Rattle seems very good to me. Especially on Sibelius but I remember being blown away by some Tchaikovsky he did. Like most conductors he has his personal ideal repertoire which can make him hard to compare.
>>
>>48731788
Oh yeah I wasn't dissing him. Just pointing out that the guy was avoiding the point I was trying to make.
>>
File: Pyrophone.png (393 KB, 461x619) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Pyrophone.png
393 KB, 461x619
>tfw you will never play a pyrophone
>>
Why do so many based conductor's last names start with "K"

Karajan
Korliov
Klemperer
Kleiber
>>
>>48725035
>Favorite composers of late?
Schumann, Ravel, Satie
>What have you been listening to?
Schumann, Ravel, Satie

>last classical piece you listened to
Robert Schumann - Fünf Stücke im Volkston, Op. 102: I. "Vanitas vanitatum". Mit Humor
>last non-classical song/piece you listened to
The Books - Take Time
>>
>>48732081

>Koroliov
>Konductor

lel
>>
>practicing with a friend
>play section of the piece the worst I have ever done
>"That sounded great Snozz!"
why can't I have patrician music friends to cut me down?
>>
>>48731893

Gives a whole new meaning to L'art Pompier
>>
>>48732169

Playing any concerts soon?
>>
>>48732242
Auditions for chair/ensemble placements is all.
>>
>>48732274

What were you practicing?
>>
>>48732169
I would call you Snobbery for short instead of Snozz
>>
>>48732288
Bernstein Sonata/Til Eugenspiel excerpts.
>>48732294
Hell I'd probably be fine with it.
>>
File: CLTallis.jpg (15 KB, 300x400) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
CLTallis.jpg
15 KB, 300x400
>>48732081
>Karajan
>based
>>
File: 1380901537092.png (263 KB, 500x500) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1380901537092.png
263 KB, 500x500
So where can I find a list of MEGA uploads of /mu/ approved classical?
>>
>>48732562
The chart has rutracker links.
>>
>>48732562
>>48732593
also: https://mega.co.nz/#!1V8TSDwL!e5er4zSSyB3kPArCUM02-1KXzlyOkfgfJl6XE9w5orY
>>
>>48732593
These seem to be all flac, and even though it'll make me sound like a garbage pleb, I prefer 320 mp3 so I can listen in the car on my phone
>>
>>48732670
Use MusicBee then. Super easy converting.
>>
>>48731259
you know, karajan's brahms is actually even worse than his bruckner.
>>
>>48731259

> listen to Herbie conduct R. Strauss, Bruckner or Brahms.


The general dislike is more often than not, in regards to his recordings from the 70's and 80's which are considered "bad" (though in some cases I would disagree with). For me, his strengths were in his earlier years, especially his '63 Beethoven Symphony cycle, Brahms Symphonies from the '60's, and Brahms' Ein deutsches Requiem from the late 40's. Hell, even Karajan's last recording of Bruckner's 7th is really good.


Just like Bernstein and nearly every other conductor, Karajan had his strengths; but also his weaknesses. The great thing about multiple recordings of a piece is that you don't have to listen to what you don't like.
>>
>>48733056
>and Brahms' Ein deutsches Requiem from the late 40's.
that's literally the sloppiest studio recording of the requiem i've ever heard.

choral music and karajan is a recipe for disaster. i should upload that missa solemnis snippet where he doesn't give a shit that part of the choir finishes their "amen" a second too late.
>>
>>48733106
or remember how he flew his viennese amateur choir to london instead of using the fucking philharmonia choir.

so retarded.
>>
>>48733106
I'll allow you Karajan bashing so long as you don't praise Bohm.
>>
>>48733167
Too bad he had a keener ear than you could ever hope for
>inb4 butthurt
>>
Which composer's music has gotten the most people laid?
>>
>>48733106

When in consideration of the fact that 67 years have passed since that recording, it's pretty easy to find recordings with better quality of sound; but that doesn't entirely take away from the performance. Karajan's work is still very good, even though I agree the recording hasn't aged too well.
>>48733236

Fuck.....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-mgLBSaN94
>>
>>48733236
i only bash karajan in certain repertoire, same with böhm. i'd even take karajan's mozart over böhm's if that makes you happy. if they'd stuck to late romantic and 20th century stuff i wouldn't have beef with them.

>>48733279
too bad that didn't stop him from tolerating sub-par choral singing.

>>48733388
i'm the last person to be turned away by recording quality, it's just a rather sloppy performance with an abhorrent choir. the tempi are middle-of-the-way and frequently unsuited to the declamation of the text, compare how the apocalyptic part is both slower and less precise under karajan's baton, compared to lehmann's dramatic and in-tune (that c major cadence at the end) performance.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvmodaPDLoI#t=54m28s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxTu0rHnVW8#t=57m21s

that lehmann recording is so good.
>>
>>48731873
You weren't making a point. You were trying to let Sir Simon do that for you. But Sir Simon said Karajan wasn't flawless, which is fucking obvious if anything. You however said Karajan was Shit. You are an imbecile.
>>
>>48733579

This isn't about which recording is "better". I prefer the Lehmann recording over the '47 Karajan any day of the week; but we're not talking about how the Lehmann recording is "better". If we are talking about which recordings we prefer, then I would pick 4-5 recordings over the '47 Karajan; but that does not mean "therefore, it sucks". That one part you linked to is a bit grating, though Hotter and Schwarzkopf are the highlights for me.
>>
>>48733854
>>
>>48725035
>last classical
brahms clarinet quartet
>last non-classical
no one sleep in tokyo
>>
>>48733916
if there is anything close to 'bait' in this thread it's:

"karajan is shit"
>>
>>48733958
"karajan is shit" is technically a meme.
>>
>>48734010
Sorted then. Thank you.
>>
>>48733927
You mean Brahms' Quintet? Which recording out of curiosity?
>>
>>48734060
>brahms clarinet quartet
oops, yeah i meant the quintet. the one with charles draper and the lener string quartet. i think it mightve been the first complete recording of it, in the late 1920s or so.
>>
What's your favourite variations/fantasia in which one composer uses a theme or themes by another composer?
>>
>>48734260
My professor has an old Draper recording of Mozart's Quintet. Great player but I don't quite like the tempi. Particularly the first movement...very fast.
>>48734390
Where's that guy who always posted about Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Tallis?
I like Brahms' Variations on a theme by Schumann: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx9Tije-nwk
>>
>>48734390
beethoven's diabelli variations
>>
Do you guys think 24bit downloads are worth it? Thinking of buying a 24bit recording of pieces by Schumann and Holliger.
>>
>>48734390
brahms paganini

>>48734447
i dont find the movement very fast but a just a little too much. the recording at bit has an air of relaxed rhythm, which doesnt help. as for draper, i really enjoy his rubato phrasing, though some may dislike it
>>
>>48734390

Brahms wrote some of my favourites. His Paganini Variations are great, as is 'Variations on a theme by Handel'. I also quite like Chopin's Variations on 'La ci darem la mano'. It works quite well and is a good piece considering that it's fairly early on in Chopin's compositional lifespan

VW Thomas Tallis Fantasia is also really great, probably one of the best things he wrote.

One that I've grown fond of recently after discovering it by accident is Hindemith's 'Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes by Carl Maria von Weber' which is very very enjoyable.

And I suppose the final movement of Mendelssohn's 5th symphony is probably my overall favourite, even though it's part of a symphony and not just variations on its own. Ein Feste Burg lends itself very well to adaptation. Totentanz can probably be included for Liszt there, even though the Dies Irae chant doesn't really have a 'composer'
>>
>>48734680
Yeah, I mean the important thing is that he can play well and doesn't really tend to overstate his role in the Quintet.
>>48734703
Love the Symphonic Metamorphoses. Probably the 2nd is my favorite.
>>
>>48734544
16 bit is good enough.
>>
>>48734785
Aight. I'll probably just get the CD then (cheaper anyways).
>>
>>48730321
That was fantastic, thanks for sharing. I'm keen on Bach's organ works but haven't checked out anything earlier than Buxtehude, so this was a mind opener.
>>
>>48735197

Are you saying you've never heard of Buxtehude? Or Paumann and Landini?

Check out Frescobaldi's organ stuff for even more early organ fun.
>>
>>48732169
What instrument do you play?
>>
>>48735282
I play Clarinet.
>>
>>48735231
I'm saying I've listened to Buxtehude but no organ music earlier than him or Pachelbel (I heard of Buxtehude through looking into Bach's work).

Listening to the rest of the Buxheimer now, will be sure to check out Landini and Frescobaldi as well. Would love to learn to play the organ someday, such an incredible sound.
>>
File: unsure-date.jpg (93 KB, 650x350) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
unsure-date.jpg
93 KB, 650x350
>mfw das klagende lied is my favorite work my mahler.
>>
>>48735691
Mahler's voice works are great, don't feel so unsure about it.
My favorite is probably Symphony 2 or 4 personally.
>>
>>48735739
apparently bernstein deemed it unworthy of recording (dkl). my favorite mahler symphonies are nos. 1, 2, 4 & 9. i also love rueckert lieder.
>>
>>48735851


I feel terrible because I don't like the 4th or 5th but love the 2nd, 6th, and 9th.


Please. Someone help me love the 4th and 5th
>>
>>48735929
i can only recommend my favorite recordings of the 4th: stenz/gurzenich; de waart/dutch radio philharmonic; bertini/wdr koln; klemperer/philharmonia (the list goes really). i cannot help you with symphony no. 5 because i hate it.
>>
>>48735929
5th you either love or you hate.
The 4th is just such a charismatic symphony without being too over-the-top. People always talk about feels in the 2nd Symphony because, well, it's impossible to not feel with that grand finale. But the 4th is able to do it without fortissimos or grand choirs. That's always the indication of a great work to me.
>>
>>48734390
Brahms - Handel variations
Busoni - Variations and Fuge in Free Form on Chopin Prelude in C minor
Liszt - Reminisces de Don Juan (fantasia on Don Giovanni)

>>48735929
Walter and Barbirolli have the best recordings of the 5th I've heard but it's not one of my favorites.
>>
bump.

come on ya'll
>>
>>48738045
what do you want
>>
>>48738119
idk the thread was about to die
>>
God Faure's Piano Quartets are so beautiful.
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Sb7gp98wAc
>>
Is this the one to get or is there a better one?
>>
>>48739275
Faure is probably the most Proustian composer.
>>
>>48740652
Gardiner's fine, but just bear in mind that it's always streamable on Spotify (right?).
>>48740727
Proustian, I just found out, is a negative term. I disagree: his pieces are always very purposeful and logical.
>>
>>48740853
I wasn't using it in a negative sense, I just find something of Proust's sensuousness and touch of melancholy in Faure's chamber music and piano works.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UD_hP5eIFH8
>>
>>48741100
Ah! Wonderful. Because I do agree in the same way.
>>
>>48728012
no one ever mentions Martynov
>>
>>48734680
>brahms paganini
>not brahms handel
heathen
>>
>>48741189
but brahms schumann
>>
>>48741243
there's many wrong answer but just one that's right
>>
>>48741180
Little known since there's only a handful of recordings.

>>48741243
Brahms Handel is simply on another level.
>>
>>48740652
idk bought this & it's cool
>>
File: HvvwNq.jpg (320 KB, 879x870) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
HvvwNq.jpg
320 KB, 879x870
Is this the bomb or what? I think somebody decided it was fedora classical but it's still cool.
>>
>>48742992
I still say you just can't beat the original Carmina Burana
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgrWpUO_45A
>>
>>48742992
I mean the intro is fedora classical without a doubt.
Track 9 (can't be bothered to look up the name) is GOAT though.
>>
Bridge is a phenomenal British composer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWdbfU3DQlU

Had only heard his Cello Sonata before this but this is just as great if not better.
>>
>>48743169
>referring to movements as tracks

Seriously if you are going to trip at least make some effort to look like you know what you're talking about.
>>
>>48743561
>caring about semantics
I meant Track 9 of that album.
If you look it up it's like 5 or 6 parts. Does "Round Dance" work?
>>
>>48743544
>neoromantic trash
>phenomenal
>>
>>48743609
It's quite the beautiful piece if you give it a chance.
>>
>>48743544
Two of the string quartets (1 and 3?) are really good.
>>
>>48743641
Too bad he composed it so late. Its easy to compose pretty music. Its reasonably difficult to keep apace with a rapidly changing musical culture spiralling madly off in all directions. Even Rachmaninoff was able to do this to some extent. What you have posted is the very definition of dated.
>>
>>48743767
Do you not like Elgar's Cello Concerto for this reason?
If so, there is no hope for agreement between us.
>>
>>48743767
published in 1911 so not even that dated
>>
>>48743843
After Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, after Transfigured Night, after Salome and Elektra, After Variations on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, After Firebird

Dude was late as fuck
>>
>>48744047
not even 10 years after dvorak died. not like he was a dinosaur or something, just a mammoth or a sabretooth tiger.

besides, he was a brit and a contemporary of elgar, rvw, holst and so on. not like britland was known to be particularly forward looking at the time, he fitted squarely in the musical establishment of the era.
>>
Beethoven 5
Dvorak 9
Schubert 9

i'm a pleb
>>
Christ, it's so hard to memorize a fugue. I've almost got it but it won't come out of my fingers without having to stop and think.
>>
>>48744254
Yeah but what makes him interesting then?
>>
>>48744351
the quality of his music perhaps?

I don't listen to Bridge or to most of the composers from around these times but it's got more to do with the fact that I find them boring than it has to do with their music being dated.
>>
>>48744421
But for me "boring" and "dated" go hand in hand anyway so we are on the same page here. You better have some hell of a kind of melody if you are going to compose pre-wagnerian romantic in the 1900s mate or I'll give you the ol' Penn Jillette special.
>>
>>48744522
dunno, I listen to stuff like the late Carter works and it's all definitely very dated sounding for the time they were composed, I like them all the same.
>>
>tfw not musical
>tfw Watching Bernstein's Concerts For Young People and learning tons of shit


Idgaf
>>
File: Carl Orff.jpg (41 KB, 601x600) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Carl Orff.jpg
41 KB, 601x600
>>48742992
Orff is amazing! Glorious work

>Fedora
>Classical
That just can't exist. They like Tool and Dream Theater, not classical. Pay no attention to anyone who uses the term 'fedora classical'
>>
File: x_a56f3630.jpg (43 KB, 361x480) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
x_a56f3630.jpg
43 KB, 361x480
>>48728012
Most underrated Russian.
>>
>>48745104

No shit. I have no idea who the fuck that is. Btw unless you are some kind of hipster you might want to include a fucking name so he does not continue to be neglected you dummy.
>>
File: fgt.jpg (8 KB, 45x18) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
fgt.jpg
8 KB, 45x18
>>48745172
>>
>>48745172
Sergei Taneyev, to save everyone the unnecessary tedium of having to reverse image search.
>>
>>48745172
>he doesn't know who Taneyev is
>>
>>48745172
Its Sergei Taneyev you philistine!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IV1QMEC2gbM

What do you faggots think of Chesnokov?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvHAqjODCcI

Also modern Russkys tend to get pretty neglected:

Alla Pavlova for example
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMUR1wQNayE
>>
File: Vasily Kalinnikov.jpg (20 KB, 250x338) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Vasily Kalinnikov.jpg
20 KB, 250x338
Kalinnikov is also damn good

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3IBmLNLNqsI
>>
Huge Pärt Collection

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=po92rUCFP2Q

>Collage uber B-A-C-H
>Summa for strings
>WENN BACH BIENEN GEZUCHTET HATTE >Fratres
>Symphony No. 2
>Festina Lente
>Credo
>>
>>48745694
If you like minor Russians you should check Khrennikov and Kabalevsky out.
>>
>>48745822
More like Shit-tke
>>
poly-style, what composers do you hate? I've only seen you praise everyone. You have to intensely hate something in order to have taste.
>>
>>48745860
Its ok anon, Schnittke is an acquired taste.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGSq4Kc8GNU
>Holy shit, score included!

Many can't handle his bleakness
>>
>>48745926
I hate Boulez, Carter, Feldman. Atonal academic wank that goes nowhere and is more about a technical score than a nice piece of music.
I don't really like Mozart either.
>>
>>48745929
> Those fucked major cadences at 5:13

Fucking hell Schnittke. good show. Been a while since I listened to this.
>>
>>48745983
>implying Shittke and Stockhausen are not the examplaty figures within that "movement"

>I don't really like Mozart either

Who does?
>>
>>48746052
Schnittke at least gives you something to hold onto, a major cadence here, a minor chord there, a snippet of baroque fugue, a beam of light, etc. Its his combination of modern and old that really speaks to me.
>MUH POLYSTYLISM
Stockhausen I appreciate for his insanity and crazy ideas. While I don't really listen to his music, I do respect him and what he did.
>>
File: 1397006229495.jpg (126 KB, 500x678) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1397006229495.jpg
126 KB, 500x678
>>48746052
>>I don't really like Mozart either
>Who does?
People with taste, but you already know that CLT.
>>
>>48746132
The thing about taste is that everyone has their own.
I like the Requiem, and the operas are ok until you realize vibrato a shit and go back to teh purity of Monteverdi and Purcell.
>>
>>48746041
Poly-style what do you think of this? Its an opera by a dadrock legend. Its actually pretty thin thematically and the libretto is cringe-worthy quite honestly. Some parts sound Debussyian in spite of a distinctly "Rockist" Myxolydian mode pervading the whole work. Well I could share a large portion I have if you are interested. Unfortunately it is not the whole thing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWApTMStyLE
>>
>>48745929

I'll admit this is a damn sight better than that piano trio you linked a couple weeks back.
>>
>>48745983
But you still like some atonal wank. You need to find an entire genre of stuff to hate, like Italians or anything outright religious or waltzes. It deepens your appreciation for the rest of the music you still have allowed for yourself.
>>
>>48746215
I find opera in this day and age to be pretty cringe worthy. The aesthetic of the solo voice (Maximum vibrato and gay classical sound) in classical music is fucked. I think they should stick to a mixture Renaissance choral backing and the aesthetic of modern songwriting vocals (Smooth lines, unforced, probably amplified)

That piece is ok, the NEWS NEWS reminds me of John Adams. And the piece is written pretty well...

I feel the need to reinvent the vocal sensibilites of opera. With the invention of the microphone, vocals no longer have to be loud and forceful and full of vibrato to be heard. Mics can be hidden discretely on the collar etc, allowing a performer to sing a full range of dynamics and still be heard. I feel this needs to be a part of solo vocal performance in this day and age.
I fucking hate the vibrato of solo vocal performance, and I know a lot of people that feel the same, and will turn of opera as soon as the voice starts warbling.
>>
>>48746286

Who the fuck doesn't hate "light" music
>>
>>48746286
I find that hating an entire genre is a but silly. Especially as a composer, you need to be able to at least appreciate all genres. You don't have to love them, but it pays to know how the music is constructed and the aesthetics of the period.
I prefer to hate specific composers, and even then I'm always to listening to pieces by them to see if I was wrong to hate them.
Its pleb to write off whole genres.
>>
>>48746264
Oh the piano quintet?
Yeah that piece is pretty fucked. Schnittke is tough. I find his Symphonies lacking, and sometimes his large scale pieces like the Requiem are just... not for me (yet). I really like his chamber and smaller scale works.
>>
>all these plebs responding to poly-style
Disgusting.
Anyways, what are your guys' favorite piano sonata?
Hardmode: no Beethoven,
>>
>>48745983
confirmed for worst taste
>>
>>48746303
Yes, this is an excellent rant. I feel the same and mentioned it before only to have CLT and crew meme on me hard because he enjoys everything vocal. Does vibrato actually make voices seem louder? I thought it was just for effect then overdone constantly to show off training or something.
>>
>>48746433
Haydn Sonata No. 16 on a fortepiano?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SEsym-_XJg

Fucking love the sound of the fortepiano
>>
>>48746433
>Hardmode: no Beethoven,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDTgj_69JKA
>>
>>48746487
The argument is that vibrato helps the voice 'cut through' the orchestra.
With microphones and amplification, this is completely unnecessary.
Also some of the most beautiful tones of the human voice are those produced at a low volume.
When the time comes to write an opera, I'm going to rewrite the rulebook.
>>
>>48746303
Recently I have given thought to where "classical" music ought to be going from a technological standpoint myself. Somehow the orchestra is just becoming an inefficient antiquity in this day and age. We might even be at the point where we should limit sections to one or two players and duplicate the voices via speakers.

But a more interesting matter that I have been obsessing over is if we really need to continue making it acoustically. If there was not perhaps a potential renaissance for "classical" music with the aid of computers and synthesizers. I personally believe synthetic sounds now have greater potential than those created by acoustic instruments.

Of course then we would just be creating electronic music so what makes it "classical"? Well right now even the most ambitious electronic music tends to double as dance music and is virtually devoid of motivic development for instance. We could finally reconcile the long-form motivic and thematically driven music of the common practice period with the boundless musical technologies we have at our disposal. This would also make experimenting with microtonality a lot easier. And it could even be a cottage industry for the everyman. In this day and age you do not need to be a rich dandy to have command of an orchestra as you would in the 1800s. Now anyone who can get his hand on a computer and a pirated DAW with a certain level of talent can compose brilliant grand-scale works.

Inspiring shit man.
>>
>>48746433

Janacek's Sonata 1. X. 1905
or Dussek's Op.18 No.2 in A minor
>>
>>48746549

It's also do to with voice preservation. I agree that some take it too far, but you're unlikely to make much headway changing the system. All singers are taught to sing like that and you're going to have to change the work of a lifetime, which the majority of vocalists will resent.
>>
>>48746626
>All singers are taught to sing like that
Did the past 40 years blew right by you or something?
>>
File: 1393543297428.png (781 KB, 1092x1185) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1393543297428.png
781 KB, 1092x1185
>>48746590
>Somehow the orchestra is just becoming an inefficient antiquity in this day and age.
>I personally believe synthetic sounds now have greater potential than those created by acoustic instruments.
WE WERE WARNED AND TOLD THE MESSENGER TO FUCK OFF.
>>
>>48746433
While I understand Poly has his shortcomings (dismissive attitude towards Mozart) I figured he would be the guy to direct that link to. If you told any other trip to look at a piece of Opera by the drummer of The Police he'd probably thumb his nose at it. Maybe that is fair, I dunno. but I do find Poly's open-mindedness and less aggressive brand of intellectualism refreshing around here.
>>
>>48746649

I mean classical singers. You're not going to find any professional opera singer (and let's face it, who else is going to want to sing modern opera) who hasn't been taught to sing with vibrato
>>
>>48746590
>I personally believe synthetic sounds now have greater potential than those created by acoustic instruments.
I Strongly disagree. You can never get a synthesized sound to match an acoustic instrument. Nothing beats a live performance with real musicians imo. No amount of automation or detail added to a synthesized piece can recreate the tiny details of an acoustic performance (and the exact sound of the room the performance is taking place in)

The best orchestral sounds you can get on a computer are those that have been recorded from a real orchestra, and so it defeats the purpose, why not just stick with the real orchestra in the first place?

I think you'll be surprised how easy it is to do microtonal music with the modern orchestra, the modern score has been supplemented with many microtonal symbols and techniques that all orchestras can read/understand.

I would like to see what Bach or Beethoven could do on a DAW though... shit would be whack.

My main issue with classical these days is vibrato in the solo voice, and academic music that is torture to listen to. Give the people something they understand.
>>
>>48746680
>every classically trained singer is an opera singer
Again, have you been living under a rock for the past 40 years or something.
>>
>>48746626
>>48746680
Modern singers can do non vib. just as well as vibrato. you just need to indicate it in the score. I prefer a natural vibrato: just a little bit right at the end of the note.
I'm going to force my vocal sensibilities on the classical world whether they like it or not.
>>
>>48746549
At least according to what I read on Wikipedia it's only a 20th century trend. Before it was considered ornamentation. An upside to historically informed period performances. That's how I like to hear it. When something is done constantly it loses impact, like if there was no dynamics because everything is FF.
>>
>>48746665

>wooden ape instrument
>produces arbitrary resonance based on shape, materials it is made out of and method by which it is played

>synthesizer
>composer can personally calibrate every aspect of an "instrument"s sound and even have it vary throughout the work.
>implying we are not way past square waves

Sticks in the mud getting BTFO
>>
>>48746672
Holy shit that was written by the drummer of the Police? I now have mad respect for him.
Time after time the Police prove they know their shit: Sting using modes, drummer writes opera.
>>
>>48746746
For me this is a good example of vibrato:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mrVZHPikqM
Not too much, mostly just at the end of the notes.

There's nothing quite like the interweaving of non vib. lines. It sounds so pure and beautiful, like a Corelli trio sonata.
>>
>>48746701

I understand that instruments naturally produce more organic sounds. However I am only talking about how Classical music will need to move into a more modern paradigm in order to stay alive. How is your local Philharmonic working out with the KISS cycle? Exactly...

Furthermore with the technology today you can create instruments that possibly could not even exist in acoustic form. Which I think is a hell of a lot more interesting. Also as I just said the composer, in the capacity of a sound designer can tweak the timbre, attack and any other aspects specifically to his liking. I really wish I had some musical ability because this has been like a hunger for me ever since I envisioned it.
>>
>>48746706

What are you trying to say here? I'm not following really.

>>48746744

I fear that you're going to fail quite badly in this endeavour. People are slow to change.
>>
File: 1402506554314.jpg (105 KB, 540x720) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
1402506554314.jpg
105 KB, 540x720
http://strawpoll.me/2247069

time 2 vote
>>
>>48746859
>????
shit is that friendo
>>
>>48746843
I agree, electronics add another dimension to composition that composers should (and do) take advantage of.
Some good examples are Murail:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFncet5VHRs

And this piece I discovered recently, for Flute and tape:
John Elmsly - Stilldream K.

http://sounz.org.nz/content/ResoundAudio
(play the first link)
One of the best pieces for solo instrument and electronics I've heard in a while.
>>
>>48746852
see >>48746746
When was the last time you heard a single piece of vocal music composed before Mozart. Period vocalists and vocal ensembles that have taken off since the early 70s are now not an insignificant part of the vocal landscape.
>>
>>48746852
Nigga I write the score, they have to do what I say. whether it catches on or not, who cares? As long as my operas and solo songs are devoid of excessive vibrato, I'll be happy
>>
New thread.
>>48746896
>>48746896
>>48746896
>>
>>48746887

>Period vocalists and instrumentalists
>Dropping everything to sing a modern opera completely different from their repetoire
>Expecting them to be any good at it

lel
>>
>>48746882

Do you think it is at all possible at 23 years of age I could develop enough musical "instinct" to make this a reality? I tend to have a lot of original music swirling around in my head but thats it. I never played an instrument nor do .I have perfect pitch or anything like that. So am I just fucked?
>>
>>48746859
>no Tallis the rightful heir to Hipster Buddha
>>
>>48746905
This is related to
>All singers are taught to sing like that
and
>You're not going to find any professional opera singer (and let's face it, who else is going to want to sing modern opera) who hasn't been taught to sing with vibrato
in the original argument how?
>>
>>48746882
What are the electronic elements here? I can tell there is some electronic stuff but how exactly is it being implemented?
>>
>>48746913
Try fooling around with DAWs, see what comes up. usually playing an instrument and having a degree in composition helps, but you should at least try to write some stuff and see how it goes.
Studying music at college/university is really beneficial, and I can't recommend it enough. Great for learning how to write and and how to analyze your own work and become better.
Writing good music takes a lifetime, but if you never start, you'll never get there.
>>
>>48746831
That's pretty good. Didn't you mention you play a little guitar? That should give you an instinct for vibrato since it's impossible to overuse it even if you're trying to I find.
>>
>>48746972
Well the thing is I already am kind of wrapping up college in a year. A little late to be adding new degrees into the mix. Are you sure theory cannot be learned auto-didactically? Is the problem there not having someone educated to "proof-read" your work?
>>
>>48746215
Wait wasn't that guy from The Police?
>>
>>48746874
the entity you know as "friendo" has ceased to exist
>>
>>48747072
Friendo confirmed Ame 2.0
Piss off Friendo.
>>
>>48747075
what
>>
>>48746949

I was addressing Poly-Style's idea that a change in operatic norms was a feasible one. The fact that I replied to a Poly-Style post in which he said he's going to 'rewrite the rulebook' when he writes an opera should have been a bit of a giveaway.

I know that there are a growing number of ensembles who specialise in performing early music who shun vibrato, but they had (and have) nothing to do with the argument regarding opera.

And

>You're not going to find any professional opera singer (and let's face it, who else is going to want to sing modern opera) who hasn't been taught to sing with vibrato

Still holds true. You're not going to find someone specialising in early music who is just going to make a jump to a modern opera. There's a reason vocalists spend a number of years studying opera and techniques before getting anywhere near a professional role.
>>
>>48747059
Composers always need proof reading. Even I tend to fuck things up. The only composers who don't need proof reading are the autistic ones that have been writing scores since they were 6.
I think you'll find that you can write perfectly good music without a knowledge of music theory, you just have to trust your ears, and write what sounds good to you.
>>
>>48747091
>You're not going to find someone specialising in early music who is just going to make a jump to a modern opera.
What if that modern opera is written with the early music sensibilities of Purcell and Monteverdi?
>>
>>48747108

They learn more than just singing whilst at opera school.
>>
>>48746795
I also have this. I suppose its technically classical but this is stretching the definition well beyond Gershwin. Anyway about as "classical" as omnifex. You might like it, I dunno. There's a whole CD but most of it I would call straight up Jazz.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVpEvXHCheI
>>
>>48746929
He's the #1 tripfag. How can he be the worst?
>>
>>48747281
This is pretty cool!
Thread replies: 324
Thread images: 33
Thread DB ID: 7627



[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vip /vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Home]

[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vip /vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Home]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.
This is a 4chan archive - all of the shown content originated from that site. This means that 4Archive shows their content, archived. If you need information for a Poster - contact them.
If a post contains personal/copyrighted/illegal content, then use the post's [Report] link! If a post is not removed within 24h contact me at [email protected] with the post's information.