[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vip /vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y ] [Search | Home]
4Archive logo
Air Compressors
If images are not shown try to refresh the page. If you like this website, please disable any AdBlock software!

You are currently reading a thread in /diy/ - Do It yourself

Thread replies: 53
Thread images: 9
File: 342564324563.png (103 KB, 430x465) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
342564324563.png
103 KB, 430x465
why are these fucking things so expensive? looking for something to run the odd tool here and there but to get even the minimum for most tools i've looked at the compressors are at least $500

currently looking at pic related but it really seems like a lot for a fucking tank and an electric motor

http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/tools-hardware/air-tools-compressors-accessories/compressors/mastercraft-30-gallon-compressor-0589318p.0589318.html#.Vn5ZsvkrKUk
>>
Because you're shopping for the wrong type, that's for a shop setting where you have several tools. Try looking on Amazon for whatever you tool is rated at for a small one. Like 50 bucks.

I'm talking out of my Ass but this is what I've gathered from using pneumatic tools at work and having to turn the compressor on and off. Should be true to a point
>>
>>920180

For something like an impact wrench at 90psi operating

PORTER-CABLE PCFP02003 3.5-Gallon 135 PSI Pancake Compressor https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BMUGQNC/ref=cm_sw_r_other_awd_jbMFwb3HSK8YR
>>
>>920181
i've been told CFM is the most important for most tools. that one is only 2CFM while most impacts i've seen take at least 4 CFM. also other tools like grinders quickly jump up to like 10 CFM and at that point you're getting into $1000 compressors.

maybe i'm just missing something but it seems like these tools take way too much air for what they do.
>>
File: industrialgases.jpg (90 KB, 350x266) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
industrialgases.jpg
90 KB, 350x266
>>920182
You're most likely right and I'm wrong, I just wanted to throw a possibly alternative. I can't imagine having to spend that much to use air tools in the garage, must be some alternative.
>>
>>920184
>must be some alternative
that's what i keep thinking. everything i'm reading basically says that you can get away with a smaller compressor but your tools will have limited use as you wait for the compressor to cycle again.

biggest thing is i really don't know how much i'd actually use the air tools as i've never had them before so it could be something i rarely use or i could get into the habit of using them all the time. i'd hate to have to sit there for 10 min or whatever waiting for it get pressure back before i can use the tool again
>>
>>920188
The thing is they sell those small ones right next to the air tools at walmart. Sure they aren't amazing but it seems like they would work fine. I used to make some of them at my last job, HVLPs. I'll stop talking because I don't know the answer, good luck broham.
>>
>>920193
yeah i also see lots of small ones that come with impacts or nailers. i just don't want to buy something and end up unhappy with it but i also don't want to piss away a bunch of money if i don't have to
>>
>>920179
The problem is. All the good used ones are 3phase motors around the 5hp mark. And im only talking tops like 50 gallon tanks.

Your standard outlet wouldnt even support them. Hence why I stick with electric tools. A flex shaft connected to a 1/2hp motor that spins at 5000rpm. Even faster at the shaft because of the gear down. Lemme tell you. Will never bog down.. I cucked a iron nail into it and pressed it agaist 1/4plate steel and pressed as hard as I could. Got it to glow a faint red before I stopped. The thing kept spinning.

Dremels are fucking junk now.. I bought a cheap one and a friend bought the highest end one. Both died within a year. Not even production line level use either. Just once maybe a week..
>>
>>920196
problem with the 50 gallon tanks is that they are usually stationary. i haven't really seen any above 30 gallon that are portable which is a requirement for me

i do have some 220v outlets around but again that still makes it less portable. i'm on a farm so there's about 3 acres with the house and various barns/sheds and it needs to be able to be used in all of them. also occasionally i do have to pump up a tractor tire in the field and with my current 8 gallon compressor it takes 3 fucking trips just to add 5psi to a single tire. depending on the location it can also be a 30 min round trip drive back to fill up and get back to the field

i know what you mean about the dremels. i very rarely use ours but it's about 20 years old now and still works fine while my friends/neighbours go through a new one about once a year
>>
>>920201
Air compression is highly inefficient. There are losses everywhere, just to run a sander or something like that bogs down my 2,2kW compressor. An impact wrench can't be run all the time. Duty cycle is a thing so not only the oil in the pistons overheats but the motor can't usually take the punishment either, the cheap ones skimp on copper...
An equivalent electric tool uses a fraction of the electric power to output a specific power compared to running the same tool with a compressor.
I can use a 3,5kW tool on a standard (16A) breaker and its hard to find a compressor that would run a decent powertool with the power it can produce. Three phases go must you must!
>>
>>920201
Doubt you want to hear it because of cost, but it sounds to me like what you need is a compressor and a generator mounted in the bed of a beater pickup truck or buggy. A long cord on the compressor will let you charge the tank where building power is available and the generator will allow you to fill that tractor tire (or do whatever else with patience) where you can't plug in.
>>
I have I think a 15 or 20 gallon campbell hausfeld my dad got on sale at CT a long time ago. Oil-less. I built an entire car with it and its still going strong. i even used it to sand blast the other week and it kept up surprisingly well.

the cfm rating is only to be able to operate the tool continuously. by the sounds of it, you won't be running an impact wrench for hours straight so don't worry about that shit. buy something on sale that has wheels. thats it.
>>
I know this isn't exactly on topic, but what's the point of using air tools over their electric motor counterparts? Do they consume less power overall? Last longer? Stay cooler?
>>
>>920251
Its more useful in a shop setting. You can get a lot more torque out of a smaller, lighter package with air tools. Plus the power requirements are less if you are running multiple tools. If you have a shop full of mechanics constantly starting and stopping impact wrenches, the inrush current from all those electric motors gets quite high. Instead you can just have one circuit designed for the load of the compressor and thats it.

Not to mention the use of tools that require air already like paint sprayers and sand blasters etc
>>
>>920179
OP pic is not so good. For home/stationary use, get one like pic related, because of reasons:
1. the motor and compressor are totally separate, so each can be easily replaced separately
2. the compressor is a wet-style (it has oil in it) and they last way way longer than oilless compressors
3. Ingersol-Rand is pretty good brand (in USA) but the shopmate model is China-made not US, and the brand isn't critical; just getting one that is built the same way is the important idea here

do note: you need to purge the water from the tank monthly if you leave it on automatic. it should have a stopcock at the bottom of the tank to do this

--------

you can get smaller oilless compressors at many tool stores; they put out clean air and they are relatively quiet, compact and lightweight--but they DO NOT last nearly as long as a wet compressor will.

If you had a LOT of money to burn and wanted a huge air compressor, then you would start shopping for screw compressors. There is China ones for $4K or so, first-world-made ones for around twice that. Some home central AC units have gone to using screw compressors in them, but I've not seen any small shop air setups that had screws yet.
>>
>>920241
i was looking at going gas but i don't like the idea of not being able to use it indoors especially during winter. a generator is something i need to get too at some point. i did have one but lent it to some faggot and he bought it back all fucked up

>>920251
like >>920254 said but for me it's mostly due to someone giving me an entire box of old but unopened tools that i've now had sitting around for 5 or 6 years because i haven't had a compressor able to use them.

my electric tools have also been wearing out lately. i've gone through 3 fucking grinders just this year and am getting sick of buying them

>>920268
honestly i'd love to have a stationary compressor in the main barn and run lines all over it so i'd have instant access for whatever. thing is i have about 6 different barns all of which store various equipment so i need to be able to work in all locations


anyway i did end up buying the one i linked in the OP, figure i can always return it if i don't like it. i got it setup and did a quick test just running the impact. unbelievable how fast the tanks starts draining but once it hit about 80psi in the tank the compressor seemed to be able to hold it there. obviously i'd never be going non stop with an impact like that so i think i'll be fine but it does have me wondering how long it could run something that needs to run continuous like a sand blaster
>>
>>920179
$500 really isn't a lot for something that could kill you if manufactured poorly.

In fact, $500 isn't really a lot of money full stop. Especially for buying tools in Canada, where everything costs a fucking fortune.
>>
>>920179
Any $100 air compressor works for nailers and the vast majority of tools. Hobby use is totally different from a factory setting where you might be shooting 1000 nails an hour.

You need more cfm for blowing a lot of air with a wand or certain painters.

Protip: spend a little extra to remote mount it in a place to insulate from noise (attic, crawlspace, garden shed). I love my setup but it took some wiring for a remote switch and more hose.
>>
>>920579
i do need to be able to use a blow gun for 3-4 hours a few times a year to clean out the combine during and after harvest. the 8 gallon compressor i had couldn't do it for more then 5 min or so before having to wait for it to build up pressure again

also a grease gun would be nice but i think i'm gonna go battery powered for that so it can still be used while in the field
>>
>>920180
>50 bucks.
>air compressor
>for air tools

Maybe from a yardsale, but not new. You need more quality than that.

>>920179
Stick to the $200-$250 range. Trust me.

>>920201
Put it on a cheap dolly.
>>
played with it a bit more and drained the tank afterwards. seemed like a lot of water came out so i'm thinking maybe i should add a filter to it at some point? i don't think that water would be good for the tank or the tools
>>
My $120 125 psi 21 gallon oil-filled Harbor Freight compressor (which I turbocharged to 160 psi YOLO) does a fine job of everything I used it for.

Air compressors are best for short, intense bursts of power, like for an impact wrench or a blast of air. You're better off with electric sanders and etc.
>>
>>920624
Running anything made by HF past what it's rated for seems like a recipe for disaster, especially something that can explode spectacularly.
Family friend got killed by an exploding compressor a few days ago, don't kill yourself by being cheap.
>>
>>920624
it will mostly just be used for airing up tires, blowing and impacts. might use other tools every so often when it's convenient.

i bought a 20v cordless impact wrench during summer to speed up small jobs and i liked it enough that i wanted to step into something more powerful for the bigger jobs. also interested in the ratchets but i'm not sure how often i'd really end up using them over manual. i have a box with 2 ratchets, 2 grinders, 2 sanders, 2 hammers, 2 brad nailers, 1 cut off, 1 shear and 2 impacts(think they are fucked). they are cheaper powermate tools from like 20 years ago but they were free and should do alright for whatever i'd do and at the very least give me an idea if i'll like using them or not
>>
>>920179
Because it has to be of relatively high quality to not leak
>>
>>920580
Blowing out combine?!?

I used to do that. You need way way way more than $500 then.
>>
>>920708
yeah they are a cock sucker. i never seem to be able to get them clean enough either so the fucking dealer changes me a extra fee every fucking year when i take it for inspection

btw nice choice on the pic, i have the 2366
>>
File: image.jpg (1 MB, 3243x2432) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
image.jpg
1 MB, 3243x2432
I can answer any of your compressor questions, have worked on compressors up to 3000HP and everything in between. If you want a kick ass oil free compressor see pic related.
>>
>>921011
Protip: crank compressor to highest pressure and regulate down to get more use of your tank volume. A tank at 160psi has 2x capacity of one pumped to 80psi.
>>
>>921011
Is pic related good for blowing up bicycle tyres?
>>
>>921013
Depends on how many tires you want to fill OP. Z machines are usually used for food and pharmaceuticals though, they're oil free so you get nice clean air.
>>
>>921016
Just my little bros bmx. Not sure where to put it tho
>>
File: image.jpg (30 KB, 400x400) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
image.jpg
30 KB, 400x400
>>921019
Just get a little pancake compressor. They're good for odds and ends like bike tires and maybe a brad nailer, not good for impacts and such. See pic related.
>>
Get oil filled if you can afford. The noise difference is worth it.
That said I have an oil filled one in the garage and a 2 gallon Coleman for portable & indoor shit
>>
File: ac.jpg (15 KB, 300x225) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
ac.jpg
15 KB, 300x225
>>920708
This was for more than one combine, but we sometimes rented the engine-powered compressor that pulls on its own trailer. Not much need to buy that much cfm, but for this purpose you can go out in a field and keep all that shit out of your yard. More wind helps too on an open hilltop.
>>
>>920722
I have seen where handy farmers made huge cfm compressors by hooking one running v8 engine to another one that only needs to turn over.

Then you need to do some valvetrain mods to the driven one to make it just shoot out the air.
>>
File: Atlas.jpg (69 KB, 456x337) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Atlas.jpg
69 KB, 456x337
>>920251
>Do they consume less power overall?
Several times more than an electrical tool of the same output power due to additional losses from dealing with an additional energy transport system.

>Last longer?
Professional quality air tools, properly maintained, can last generations. The tool itself contains fewer points of failure than an equivalent electric tool, and those typically just need regular lubrication.

>Stay cooler?
Much cooler. The expansion of the compressed air acts like an in-tool refrigerator with a power comparable to the mechanical power involved (the compressor gets hot). High-power air tools typically get cold with extended use, unlike electric tools which have to dump waste heat from the motor. Internal frictional heat is typically less than the air cooling effect.

>what's the point of using air tools over their electric motor counterparts?
For a given power output, the tool is smaller and lighter than a typical electric tool, and it is probably quieter than a brushed electric. Reduced maintenance, which is more a factor for industrial use. Strong ventilation at the point of use, which is again more an issue for industrial use. The ability to manually throttle speed/power with the switch is common. If you're doing things like blasting or plasma cutting that need a big compressor anyway, there are logistical advantages to having mainly air tools, though if you can do without, the compressor is going to be a lot more demanding than an equivalent electrical setup.

I work with very powerful air tools professionally (eg 100+CFM grinders), and they're very good at what they do. Inflating tires is the most air-intensive thing I do at home, and to get anything close to the performance I want from tools, I'd need a several-thousand-dollar air compressor and a thorough rewiring to support it. So I just go with electric tools at home.

If you're looking at less air-hungry tools like wrenches or nailers, a smaller compressor should work fine for you.
>>
>>921024
I have one like this and use it for several types of small brad nailers, a flooring stapler, a hole puncher (in metal), a rivet gun, a sheet metal sheer, a crown molding nailer, a roofing nailer, a frame nailer and of course putting air in bike and car/SUV tires. works fine. only the larger frame nailer causes it to cycle somewhat often. everything else goes for a good amount of time before it needs to pressure up again.
for things that need a constant or somewhat constant flow of air (sanders and drills etc.) then you will start to run into problems with it constantly needing to kick on and re-pressure the tank.
>>
>>921142
i have the advantage of having a field like 50ft from my property so being messy isn't really an issue

used the compressor a bit today working on ATV brakes. took the lugs off no problem which was expected with a 650ft lb impact on lugs torqued to 45. also took the hub bolt off very easily which is usually a huge pain in the ass due to the axle spinning. only real issue i had there was that i didn't have an impact socket big enough so i decided to be stupid and use a regular socket but i'll have the right one for next time

i also used an air ratchet a bit on 10mm bolts holding the brake drum on. it took them off just fine but holy fuck was that tool slow, would have been faster with a manual ratchet
>>
>>920182
One thing with grinders and paintguns and such, they can be used with smaller compressors, but not continuously. Eventually you'll run out of air and the compressor will need to recover. With a grinder though, you can get a harbor freight 4 inch angle grinder for $20, much less than the extra hundreds you need to run an air grinder continuously
>>
>>921297
more like $50 minimum here but i use them often enough that when one goes i need it replaced fast so i usually go to the local hardware store to get fucked.

we don't have a harbor freight and the closest we have to it is Princess Auto which is about a 90 min round trip. closest hardware store is about a 15 min round trip. downtime is very important so even when it costs extra the time saved is worth it
>>
>>920179
You know what I think is way too expensive? Toolboxes. Slap some sheet metal together with slide rails and castors and charge $2000 for it. Put a Snap-on logo on it and boom all of a sudden it's 15 fucking grand. No way am I spending that kind of money on something that holds my tools, when I could be spending that money on actual tools.
>>
im looking to start sandblasting and stick welding. in my shop I only have 15amp 120volt outlets. it would be too expensive to install 220. as far as I know for sandblasting you need about 10 scfm and all the compressors that have that output are only 220. is there a way around this or do I need to buy a generator?
>>
>>922144
There's a way. It's not a particularly good way, but it'll let you blast with a small compressor. Get a big air tank (rated at least the max pressure generated by the compressor you're looking at) and run it between the compressor and the blast booth. It won't let you run continuously, but a big enough tank can let you run for usable lengths of time.
>>
>>922131
fucking right they are too expensive. i don't understand how they can justify that shit at all. i saw someone on kijiji(Canada's CL) selling a used snap-on for $12k
>>
>>922200
looked up the link again. who the fuck buys this shit?

http://www.kijiji.ca/v-tool-storage-bench/london/72-snap-on-toolbox/1128423183?enableSearchNavigationFlag=true
>>
>>922144
thought about wet sandblasting with a pressure washer?
>>
>>922201
Apparently the only place to get a (new) toolbox at a good price is Costco. A friend from work bought a full-size one (top and bottom) for under a grand. Even when Canadian Tire puts them on sale, they're still too expensive.
>>
>>922271
Costco is pretty good for stuff like that for some reason. Canadian Tire occasionally does has big sales on tool boxes but the average weekly sale is still $1000+ for a set. TSC actually has some decent sales too as does Princess Auto

i have a few plastic boxes for tools i use a lot and everything else just hangs on the wall in the main shed. even for under $1000 i'd rather just buy more tools then some fucking sheet metal box. hell i could probably make my own if i really wanted but i'm pretty happy just having shit hanging on the wall
>>
>>922238
more specifically I want to start cerakote and sandblasting is part of that im not sure if wet sandblasting would work for that
>>
>>922201

actual mechanics topkek, a guy at the shop i used to work out dropped about 40k on his
>>
>>922201
Dubs makes it worth it
Thread replies: 53
Thread images: 9
Thread DB ID: 376767



[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vip /vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Home]

[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vip /vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Home]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.
This is a 4chan archive - all of the shown content originated from that site. This means that 4Archive shows their content, archived. If you need information for a Poster - contact them.
If a post contains personal/copyrighted/illegal content, then use the post's [Report] link! If a post is not removed within 24h contact me at [email protected] with the post's information.