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safety
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You are currently reading a thread in /diy/ - Do It yourself

Thread replies: 134
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I believe an important part of doing protects by yourself is doing them safely. After all, don't you want to be able to keep doing projects?

I know some of us are just starting out and may not necessarily have an expert guiding us.

So, what tips can you give for beginners and even the more advanced of us as we /diy/?
All disciplines and tips welcome, even more so if you're an expert or professional in a particular field.
Do the safety dance
http://youtu.be/AjPau5QYtYs
>>
Measure once and cut twice!

eeer, no that's not it...

For starters, if something has even a remote possibility of badly injuring me I try to save that for when someone's around (within hearing-my-screams-of-agony distance).

Another is that unless I'm testing it at that very moment, if I have any sort of electronic device open it's properly discharged/unplugged. Most of the zap's I'll get won't do anything but scare me a bit and give a quick shot of adrenaline, but it also helps keep the thing I'm working on safe. Luckily they've got tons of built-in fuses, but there's been a time or two where I've figured I could just quickly tinker with a condensing unit and grounded out.
>>
I once set my shirt on fire with the sparks flying off an angle grinder. I used to think that wasn't possible.
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>>769244
Did the same with my pants. figured out they werent grinder friendly when my crotch caught on fire 30 minutes into an 8 hour shift. Co workers named me loosenut that day..
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>>769244
I hate using safety goggles with those, I'd rather use a face shield. I don't like shit hitting my face.
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>>769210
Here are a few safety aspects I learned from doing many projects and teaching small scale beginner level metal workshops

1. Knowledge is the most important safety equipment. Understand what you are doing and what are the forces, temperatures, radiation, chemicals etc involved. I always start workshops by demonstrating the various ways you can maim or kill yourself and others.
>See here, this is a welder, hold the terminals the wrong way and 100V, 80 A will go through your heart, oh btw, 100mA is deadly...

2. Know when to stop. Each and every time I hurt myself was when I was tired at the end of the day and
> let me quickly just....

3. Always use protection. Don't just have it, use it. Gloves, hearing protection, goggles/face shield, correct clothing.
>mfw endless youtube movies with dudes welding/grinding/forging in a tshirt

4. Common sense and situational awareness. Where am I, what am I doing, who is around me? Even when soldering and about to clip a lead, check out where it can fly and whose unprotected eyes are nearby.

Once you train yourself with these things in mind, they become second nature, and you stop thinking about them, just do them. Therein lies 5,

5. Never fully relax when dealing with power tools/high temperatures/chemicals/large forces
>>
>>769210
focus on the task at hand, don't diy while distracted. it'll end up at best with shoddy work that you have to redo.. at worst with major injury.

also as a general rule take a moment to take a slow breath and give the tool, area your working in, and part your working on a good once over before beginning any operation with a power tool.
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>>769210
Never take the shield off a grinder, and use a bigger disc.

Always keep the splitter on a table saw, whats the point in removing it anyway?

hearing and eye protection.

Molten metal does not forgive, and you will surely not forget. if it ends up on your clothing/skin.
>>
I'm not new to woodworking, but there are many things I have not done yet.

For the first time, I need to cut 4"x6" hardwood. I thought my tablesaw would be fine, but learned today (from reading) that it could be pretty dangerous to cut wood that thick on a table saw. A safer option is a bandsaw. I'm going to buy the $189 craftsman 10" bandsaw for this project.

Themoreyouknow.jpg
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>>769259
Definedly keep the shield on the grinder. I got lucky. You might not
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>>769255
>always start workshops by demonstrating the various ways you can maim or kill yourself and others.

> Mr. Tonn
>6 th grade shop class
> went from losing fingers to the guy at Pratt and Whitney getting his long hair caught in a lathe and being scalped to death.

Actually happened to a grad student in New Haven CT and I thought of his lecture that was 20 years ago.

It's funny that book smart people do dumb shit. I just hope that they at least gave a safety lecture there and she goofed and didn't die because no one told her.
That's a terrible way to go, you know you're fucked, stuck, in pain, going to die and there is no way out of it.
Of course she was in the room alone too.
Another big no no when working with anything like that.
>>
>>769255
>I was tired
Why I crashed my motorcycle both times.

>Common sense and situational awareness.
This for life in general.
I smh when I see people with headphones in and face buried in the screen crossing the road without looking.
People die preventable deaths so often it's ridiculous. It's even worse when it's a kid since they don't know better and have shit parents.
/rant
>>
>>769265
Found the article. Also found the Yale safety thing she had to do. I'll post the pdf tomorrow morning after I've slept and screen shoted the 7 pages. Full color with the machines, actually really good info.
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>>769270

Of course I forgot the link.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/14/nyregion/yale-student-dies-in-machine-shop-accident.html
>>
Test and sage
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>>769272
Ignore this one.

Couldn't sleep so here are 7 pages in order. The link for the pdf is here:

http://www.eng.yale.edu/metl/Mason%20B-7%20ME%20Student%20Shop%20Safety_1.pdf
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>>769287
2/7
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>>769289
3/7
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>>769290
4/7
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>>769292
5/7
>>
>>769293
6/7
>>
>>769294
7/7

Hope these help.
>>
circular saw safety:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4kxQqBu3ME
>>
grinder safety:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iaoVqUpOrPs
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>>769210
Ah, and lets not forget a true safety classic:
Staplerfahrer Klaus

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjtFxsPcrhI

Worth watching to the end
>>
rotary hammer safety:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oGphjIuyDg4
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>>769300
Yes, this truly is a /diy/ classic.
But you must watch it long enough to when the "action" happens.
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>>769299
This has that preview bullshit slapped across the screen the whole time, too distracting.
>>769298
Loved the blood at the end, nice touch
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>>769295
more helpful than just a flat recommendation.
>>good post, 10/20, would retweet
>>
>>769298
That worksafeBC you found is pretty good.
I found some vids on real industrial accidents that were quite gory.
One guy had a high pressure water jet cut up his torso and then died.

Their die grinder one had a chunk fly off and hit the guy in the face with blood.
I like these guys.
>>
>>769312
Wait, wut?
I'm not sure if that's a good thing or you're being sarcastic.

And as hot as snorl4x or however she spells it is I don't recommend you post her here lest you get b&.
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>>769255
>4. Common sense and situational awareness. Where am I, what am I doing, who is around me? Even when soldering and about to clip a lead, check out where it can fly and whose unprotected eyes are nearby.

This. Component leads can fly like small, sharp bullets sometimes. Started paying a lot more attention to them after a few bounced off my safety glasses.
It's amazing how dangerous the small things we ignore can be.
>>
>>769323
>It's amazing how dangerous the small things we ignore can be.

Especially in space. Even broken pencil lead could be a choking hazard.
It's neat watching space videos about how life on the ISS is.
Or procedures on earth to ensure nothing loose is in a module.
>>
>>769210
Always wear eye protection. Always wear hearing protection. Wear your gloves more than you think you need them. NO JEWELRY on the fingers or wrists. No loose fitting clothing. Keep long hair tied back. Seriously. This seems baby level but you'd be surprised.
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>>769248
Face shields are secondary and are to always be used in conjunction with eye protection.
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>>769268
I've hurt myself tired, but usually I hurt myself when I'm either A) in a hurry or B) in a bad mood.
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>>769295
Son, that's a scroll saw.
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>>769300
Think About This is best
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=bvkAAomMg-k
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>>769210
Did a board of women take over 4chan ???
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>>769370
That makes no sense.
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>>769299
Now I remember the reason why my mech101 instructor raaaaaaaaaaaaged at my classmate for grinding bronze rod instead of filing it. Pic related. We're only supposed to file bronze rod to make pic related. Idiot of a classmate decided to grind. I told him "Its better to get yelled to death than to get shotgunned in the face by your fuckstickery, dimwit!"
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>>769389
You posted the thumbnail m8.
Can't see what is what

Wtf? I lost count of how many Google image captchas I've gotten that were birthday cake
The others are coffee and pizza
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>>769210
I built a fume extractor out a PC fan I found at a recycle center, a dollar store wire pencil cup, filters for those filtering ashtrays, and the bendy ring cable thing from a dollar store LED lamp. It's quiet and very ghetto, but it does remove the smell quite a bit. I still see smoke come out the other end, but dissipated and more fog like. Should this be any concern? How can I make it better?
>>
>>769408
Oh hey, I remember you from the other thread. Glad it works. Once I start to tier I should make onsuche.
>>
>>769375
I think he means that only REAL MEN should be using anglegrinders without glasses, that REAL MEN use a lathe while wearing a tie and a scarf, That REAL MEN dont need a mask for TIG welding, etc.

It should also be noted that "real men" like him are usually Darwin Award-winning idiots.

the one I disagree with is "no gloves" - I tend to work with belt grinders for knifemaking, where sparks can get pulled all the way round the belt and flung at your hands. So I use a pair of really thin women's leather gloves, as spark protection (fortunately I've got slim hands.) specifically because unlike welder's gloves or the likes, they're so thin if they are snagged, they'll tear away, instead of being dragged in.
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>>769415
>Once I start to tier I should make onsuche
Wow, I fucked that up.
Supposed to say:
Once I start to solder I should make one of those.
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>>769415
>Oh hey, I remember you from the other thread

wut. It's the oscilloscopes right? That's just where I keep them; patiently awaiting until I can be arsed to take them to work to fully disassemble them and fix the non working one.
pics:
http://imgur.com/a/q2Y9K#0
The materials I used are all shown in the previous picture. The reason for the extended box is to keep a compressible volume of air that will filter slowly through a larger filter area. The assembly & bendy tube lamp, dollar store. You can figure out how much they cost. The fan, I got :
https://archive.moe/diy/thread/757835/#757835
The filters were by far the most expensive part, $10USD at a wallmart for a pack of 4 + gas from driving around to various stores looking for carbon filters.
found here:
http://www.amazon.com/Holmes-Carbon-Filters-HAPF60-Filter/dp/B000063SKE
but you can sure find cheaper at a store.
I used 1 that is poorly cut and poorly put together(eyeball once, cut and affix until shit's the right size type design). They are annoying and leave black dust all over the place every time they're handled.

Does anybody know what I've circled here is called and where I can harvest longer and stronger lengths, or how can I better affix the fan to the bendy tube? I'm currently using bailing wire and the upper ring of the pencil cup.
>>
One of the most major things I monitory is my mental state in regard to being tired.

If I notice I've skipped a step or and having a bit of difficulty or I'm getting aggravated I stop and reaccess my mental state. I'll look to see if time has slipped by and I've skipped a meal or I should be going to bed. I'll also think a bit about how physically tired I am.

When you are tired or not thinking clearing because of fatigue or something like hypo/hyperglycemia you need to stop and fix the issue before continuing. One wrong move, one safety procedure forgotten, or measurement done incorrectly can ruin your project or your life.

I've seen people do some pretty stupid things simply because they were tired or were "trying to get it done before lunch". Like placing a sheet of plywood on a roof then stepping on it and almost riding it off the roof to certain death. I've seen a guy with an oxyacetylene torch turn the wrong valve on, spewing oxygen all over without even realizing it. Just completely stupid and easily avoidable things.

I don't just say "Oh, I'm fine." I really sit and think about it for a few moments. Who knows, it may have saved my life a time or two or at least saved the project I've been working on.

Weariness and fatigue can kill. It is one of the things rarely mentioned in safety courses I've been in.
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>>769448
Tired doctors kill patients, tired drivers kill cars, tired engineers kill companies.
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>>769259
Because throwing a 45 miter on a two inch style that needs to be exact. Is a pain in the ass when you got a blade guard and splitter all up in the way of what you're trying to look at and judge if you need to adjust the fence or not.
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>>769418
http://youtu.be/O4ztFeMPmRk?t=4m10s
REAL MEN
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>>769407
Its a bronze version of wood clamp. It's a soft metal already so filing it should be easy. Yet idiot classmate decided to grind it. Soft metal embeds into the grinding stone and puts more pressure with a high risk of exploding.

>Vintage nicholson heavy duty file
>Decided to use Baldor instead
>facepalm.jpg
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>>769427
lel.
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>>769427
>wut. It's the oscilloscopes right?
No, you were talking about making a fume extractor in electronics general iirc.
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>>769459
>>769459
>pain in the ass
So that justifies it?
Maybe there is another tool that would work better?
Sloppy kills, anon. History is littered with bodies of examples.
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>>769577
Psh.

One time I grabbed my iron without as it rolled off the table. It sizzled in a second Burned my thumb pad so bad. It was dead white grey for weeks and took months to heal properly. Even when the skin looked normal if I took a shower it was obvious.
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>>769354

On some machines you really shouldn't wear gloves, things like lathes and routers for example. Your glove could get caught and it can drag your fingers into the machine.
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>>769599
Right.

But there are a lot of times, especially when handling and manipulating materials, that gloves can really save your hands.

Also with chemicals, cleaners, solvets, etc, gloves really protect you from long term exposure.
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>>769599
To add: be fucking careful with a router. A router accident isn't a nicked finger, it's a hospital trip.
I've seen a lot of people get lax around routers because the cutting surface is small, unlike a table/band/miter saw.
>>
COMPLACENCY IS THE KILLER

Never let yourself become too comfortable in an area or performing a job that is dangerous. At the point you become acclimated to danger is the point where you stop questoning the situation. I've caught myself doing it before.

There was one time where i was up a petroleum reactor and needed to climb a ladder to get to a leaking pipe. I'm all alone up there. I look around the platform and find a step ladder. I set it up and climb it like i do 20 times a day. I climb to the maximum of 6 feet and begin making my repair. I'm having trouble grabbing a wrench out of my pocket so I turn and look back towards my pocket and i see it. I'm 180ft up in the air, on a 5ft wide platform, 4ft handrail, 6ft up a ladder. I see the angle, if the ladder tips it's launching me clean over the rail. I never did that again.
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>>769718
If you read industrial accident reports, they paint a rather shitty image of the oil industry. As in, production pressures are often more important than safety. It doesn't help that paying the fines can be cheaper than doing things safely.
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>>769255
>>769323
>Component leads can fly
It's good practice to press the lead with your index finger while you hold the wire cutter in your palm and use the rest of your fingers to apply pressure on it. That way they won't fly all over the place.

I made a pic that might explain it better, I'm no artist though so the hand looks a bit wonky.
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>>769747
That's what I started doing actually. Except holding the lead with two fingers (huge hands ftw).

>>769592
Done that though I started realizing what I was doing half way so just lightly touched it.
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>>769666

Yep. I've got a little 1/2HP router on a table at home. It's easy for the work to be repetitive if you're processing a lot of cuts (like chamfering every edge on a set of kid's wood blocks).

I once looked up this factoid- hard maple wood is nearly as dense as human bone. If your tool has no problem going through hardwood, it's not going to have any problem going through you, bones and all.
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>>769753
that's pretty much what happened, although I caught the cable and the iron swung onto my arm.
"Babe, why is there a rocket ship on your arm?"
>>769718
and this pretty much sums it all up. You get comfortable you make assumptions/cut corners. It only takes one missed step at the right time for it all to go to hell.
>>769747
Had never been a concern since I wear glasses, but then I found two leads at the bottom of my coffee mug one day. Been doing this ever since.
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>>769312
>Good post
>10/20
WHAT?
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>>769295
Scroll saw.
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>>769448
Last safety course I attended the instructor commented the main reason for accidents...
"Under-quoting on a job. You cut corners or work too fast or work too long to close the job out in a day or you just want to get it over with."
I think he was onto something.
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>>769771
>two leads at the bottom of my coffee mug one day.
Yum
Travel mugs are good for work where shit might be flying around in the air.
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>>769747
Get the kind with the spring in the jaw. It really works.

Also that guy has one fucked up finger.
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>>769313
how does the waterjet accident happened? i work with those all day
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>>770007
I was going to try and pick one of those at radio shack with the closing sale.

>Also that guy has one fucked up finger.
Better for prostate massage kek
>>
>>770052
Watch the vid, it explains it. Wasn't secured and it flew out wildly then sliced him up.
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>>769247
Why loosenut? I'd figure firecrotch to be a better moniker.
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>>770057
... what video? am I missing something?
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>>770072
There's a video they made about that incident. They make a few vids about real incidents and show how they can be preventable.
Dig around their videos.
I'll try and find it later if you can't
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>>770074
Drop some names, like the company that made the video for instance?
>>
don't force a power tool, let it do the work

never use a drill to go diagonally through metal, to widen a hole (yes i know you all do it)

keep your workspace free from dirt, flamable materials and trip hazards

put your tools back in their place or you'l choke

watch your leads, keep them behind you if you can

grinders are way more dangerous than they look, don't get complacant

DONT USE A BENCH VICE TO HOLD A POWER TOOL STATIONARY

don't work when you're over tired, you'l only do a poor job anyway

if working with hazerdous chemicals keep a bucket of sand to soak up spills, remember ventilation is different to just blowing fumes around, a fan in a closed room is't ventilation, nor is leaving the door open and using wind

keep a wireless phone at your station somewhere you can reach it from the ground
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>>770079
I already posted it lol.
worksafeBC
Check out their channel
>>
>>770088


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeZlI9fLjOo

i tought it was a waterjet cutting machine, like thisone
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=crgujRcyhhE
>>
>>770096
Oh, I see what that would be confusing.
It's amazing the power of water under immense pressure.
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>>769299
and this is why I'm an electrical engineer. good grief, that's terrifying.
>>
>>770109
>It's amazing the power of water under immense pressure.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMHwri8TtNE
one of 4chan's favourites.
>>
>>770112
I cri evry tiem. ;_;7
rip in peace little buddy
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>>769728
BP is pretty bad for that. Marathon is very safety centric, some more than others, but if you have the potential to fuck other people up because you're being careless they may kick you off the site and bar you from all of their facilities.

There's another site we have that's really low level, that just got shutdown because they released h2s on 2 contractors, the dudes had to get dragged out. The facility had no personal h2s monitor requirement, and no sign in procedure(which violates an osha rule on process safety management).

A lot of times operations personnel will have to put themselves in danger, if there's a unit upset that could cause something like a release or explosion. They have to run out and take the steps necessary to circumvent something that's potentially catastrophic. One facility i was at has a massive process waste sewer system, they were purging naptha to it at one side and a half a mile away some guy was welding. It's policy to cover every drain when there's a potential of creating an ignition source, but one got missed. Sparks hit the drain and it flared up. The pipe fitters called area operations, area operations called central control, central control let the plant know, within 2 minutes there were over 100 hoses pumping nitrogen into the system across the plant and they had foam pumper trucks out ready to go. I've never seen team work quite like that, but those dudes saved us all from having a really bad day.
>>
first: This is all really good advice for someone who has been reading about shit for the better part of three years and is building babbys first project right now.
>>769747
Good Idea, never really spent a second thought on the little fuckers. I'll defo be more careful with that. Also
>pic fukken saved
>>770007
I bought basically that exact cutter 10 hours ago
>>770227
good god that is terrifying. I'm glad I don't have to work in conditions like that.

I remember being told the following: At my Uni they experiment a lot with arsenic based diodes. Now to make these you need a gas called arsine. In the words of a coworker of mine: "It's one of those chemicals that were only made to suck". It's colorless, odorless, a little bit heavier than air, just so much that it can be stirred up but not float away and concentrations of 250 ppm are rapidly fatal. Now, at my uni, they have enough of that shit in storage to basically kill the entire district twice (about 120000 people). It's pumped from the bunkerlike room in the basement through stainless steel pipes about .5" in diameter with a wall strength of about 1/8" with specially vented boxes at every weld or intersection between two sections of piping into the only laboratory that has acess to it. That laboratory is rigged, so that in certain events, like drastic temperature change or a leak, the door is automatically closed and sealed with fucking thermite. Meanwhile, two rooms over, the fattest professor ever is holding a lecture on masses on slopes. Freaky shit...
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>>769255
*applauses*
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>>769210
awesome thread, awesome peole here
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>>769450
great mate
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I also wear safety glasses when trimming my nails. Shit could fly everywhere. Learned my lesson 4 years ago
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>>769771
neat... sipping coffe at workplace

tell me, even in paperwork how this is safe?
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>>770543
>pic related

i just blew your mind
>>
>>770511
Do you go to school in Raccoon City, perhaps?
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Something I haven't seen mentioned here is also proper illumination. Being able to spot an issue before shit goes wrong is one of those tiny meaningless things were it's hard to judge how much has been prevented. Like noticing a tiny solder bridge on an IC after it comes out of the oven.

>>770545
it isn't. but frankly, at least early in the morning, I need the alertness. It's either insane amounts of caffeine or going back to concerta/aderall.

>>769911
Lucky I came across this thread on the front page again. Never really thought about it. Just bought three from amazon.
>>770007
flush cutters are amazing, I have a pair of CHP-170's. That being said, that's pretty much all they're good for.
>>
My code of conduct,

A tidy work environment is a safe environment. (also prevents mistakes and damage to material)

Right tool for the right job.

A dust mask for working with any fine dust, especially when mixing cement.

Glasses for when cut metal and plastics, and any job I feel the bit or blade may break.

Lift with the knees.

Its all common knowledge once you realise that a few simple rules actually make the job go easier.
>>
>>770546
>>770546
That looks comfortable for your fingers. I need that.

Where did you get yours?
>>770538
Thanks m8

>>770577
This, all of it.
The lifting with legs/strait back.
I've been in agony for 5 years so far because I fucked up my L5 due to shit lifting.
Going back to the dr today actually.
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>>770573
oh i forgive you

i use caffeine and ritalin till i get the cramps and spasms

then i sleep for 40h
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>>770577
>Right tool for the right job.

this is the fuckin best advice ever... i say more

if something is being hard to do, is because u have the wrong tool
like the pic
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>>770641
this ... pic
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>>770636
I used to take nuvigil. That shit keeps you going.
>>
>>770550
nope, sry.
>>770661
>>770636
shit mang, people talking about work safety and taking prescription drugs on a regular basis...
>>
>>770112

That...
Is...
AWESOME

"When it's got ya... It's GOT ya."
>>
>>769255
>100v, 80a
I didn't know humans had a resistance of 1.2ohms. Explains why stuff keeps arcing at me.
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>>770661
never tried modafinil...
but is a CYP450 inhibitor so must be like MAOIs on turbo

>>770749
do your homework, these are all alertness and concentration drugs that are safe and tested
the chance of having some kind of bad reaction is the same as of having a heart attack
>>
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Best advice I have ever been given is keep working. You WILL fuck up repeatedly. To an embarrassing degree. Everybody started out being a bumblefuck. So be a man (or woman/trannie) and keep going.

Also I know a fair bit about chainsaws, more then the average person so I feel comfortable giving advice. I used to cut timber for pulp and paper, and now just cut firewood as a business to pay for school.
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>>770896
Best thing I've learned is to fucking stop working.

Spend 4 hours locating a cable. Have no luck. Say fuck it, go to lunch, come back, check your map again, it's another house over, fuck you GPS. Find it in 20 minutes counting setup. 4 hours wasted.

Nothing worse than trying to get something done after 10 hours of work and making bad decision after bad decision because you're tired.
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>>770911
I did not mean, non stop, I mean keep trying things in different ways. I should have noted that more clearly. But at the same time, if you dont have the mental fortitude to work for four or five hours and cannot find the proper location to work in, you are not going to be safe whatever you do.
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>>770982
40 year old maps.
Map doesn't have houses on it, just cables and streets.
Meth heads in every house have dogs that want to kill me
Pot growers think I'm a cop there investigating them, they want to kill me.
Bird wont stop yelling at me.
Have to walk around the block to change settings on my locator because lol GPS tracking.

Fuck cable locating.
>>
>>770573
>Just bought three from amazon.
Travel mugs?
>>
>>770896
I hope you mean keep working on a long term basis and not give up.
Otherwise your advice is dangerous and goes against countless studies on the subject as well as basic common sense.
>>
>>770749
Nuvigil was prescribed for my narcolepsy silly. It kept me awake and alert instead of the fog I used to be in. That is much safer.
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>>770998
I have done surveying, but you cant trust the maps. Every tried doing timber layout on an old plot where it is literally full of barbed wire? not fun, plus pot growers just shoot at you instead of just wanting to kill you.

>>771024
two posts down I just said just that. I also come at it with the attitude of piece work. I cut wood for money, if I stop working I lose money. Slow and steady wins the race. I always am more successful working slow for 10 hours then fast and hard for 6. Being methodical and careful is the safest way to be. When i first learned to fall timber I immersed myself in the whole world of it and read every periodical, book, and paper I could find. Understand your risks so you can make informed decisions.
>>
>>771118
>fall
I thought it was fell. As in I fell trees.
>>
>>769244
I once caught my not-particularly loose shirt in an angle grinder with a wire brush attachment. Nothing more than a good tattoo-removing graze and a burned out motor, but the potential for disembowelling myself with a cut-off disk or catching my beard and ripping off my jaw shattered my nerves.

The big wire brush attachments on a small, lightweight grinder has a ton of centrifugal force. If it kicks back, and it does really easily, it's gonna need some damn strength to stay in control.
>>
>>769527
... I think I'm going to need to watch those videos.
>>
>>771797
>centrifugal force
Sorry to nitpick, but it's angular momentum.
>>
>>769210
Always use eye and ear protection. You would not believe how much a tiny scratch on your eyeball hurts until it happens. And tinnitus is a stone bitch. I have to sleep with a fan on now to drown out the ringing.

When welding, use the proper shade lense. And beware reflected flash. Flash burnt eyeballs burn with the agony of a thousand suns. And cover exposed skin. Three minutes exposure will give you a sunburn like you won't believe. And skin cancer, later. Speaking of which, respiratory protection when appropriate. Study the hazard, know when to ventilate and when to mask up.

Never wear gloves when operating floor or bench mounted machinery- grinder, lathe, drill press, saw, what have you. If a workpiece is hot or sharp, hold it with tongs or pliers. Gloves can get sucked into stationary equipment and cause truly gruesome avulsions. It sucks to have to unwind a bloody mess of glove and flesh from a spindle before you can load the guy onto a gurney. The guy in question won't like it either.

Gloves with portable power tools are ok and recommended.

Read the MSDS before using any type of potentially hazardous product. For our purposes, it's hazardous if you're not willing to put it in your eye or sprinkle it on your breakfast cereal
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>>771867
>avulsions
Just looked that up. *shudders*
I learned a few things from your post. Thanks m8
>>
Always inspect tool/workstation before you start the task. There's a guy at work who had a concussion from a Co2 tank falling on his head. It's about the size of a goose egg. Interesting how the company tried to keep it quiet so that the CEO, COO and manager wouldn't face jail time.
>>
ell, we just have a furnace explosion on the factory, nno one dead by divine grace, but the main mechanic is out of combat for a while if he ever comes back.

What went wrong? still dont know, but we are investigating, and find out that could be at least a few things, and that is bad, we dont know what went wrong because there was so many things that could have gone wrong with it.

-gas purge to a non spark free enviroment,
-a bad gas line.
-excessive gas for the pilot
-operator error.

etc. damn, that things make you think.
>>
>>772318
What type of furnace anon?
>>
>>772274
This reminds me of something about work injuries.
NEVER SIGN ANYTHING THEY GIVE YOU!
I was so upset when someone I knew got hurt at work and she signed something saying she was ok. She never even got checked out for it. Even if they threaten you with job termination don't do it. better to lose the job then to have a real medical problem that you can't afford because the business insurance company is off the hook.
Protect your health above all else. I'm about to get a second back surgery, I know all too well.
>>
>>772385
>if they threaten you with job termination
I contact my lawyer and the workers union, in that order, right?
>>
>>772387
Yes as well as the department of labor. Unions are great for this if you're lucky enough to be in one.
>>
It's a given, but you always need to be paying attention to what's going on around you.

I work in a small recycle yard at a chemical manufacturing plant that they set up to save some money by selling anything metal they need thrown out. We have a huge bin (don't know exactly what it's called, about the size of a shipping container) that we throw all the steel into, and sometimes we have to hop inside of it to move stuff around and make more space.

We had a guy moving some large steel framework into the bin with a forklift, while there was another worker inside the bin. The frame caught the lip of the bin and fell in. One of our coworkers yelled for the guy inside, who stood up to look just in time, and the frame knocked the hat off his head when it almost hit him.
>>
>>769210
Get some eye protection.
>be on construction site w/dad
>be 10 ish.
>see guy using table saw.
>guy saws his fingers off, and when he took his hand off the sliver he was cutting, it came up and took his eye out.
>so, the moral of the story is:
>wear eye protection.
>>
>>772385
>>772387
>>772394
Definitely all this.
My uncle had a desk fall on him at Steelcase Furniture because it hadn't been properly secured on a pallet rack. No fault of his own, just the wrong place, wrong time. They had him sign a thing saying he wouldn't sue, but the fine print said that Steelcase wouldn't pay for -shit-
Ten years later, he's had most of a vertebrae removed, had spinal fluid leaking from his ear, and he can't stand or walk for more than about ten feet.
All complications from that accident.
>>
>>772539
These agreements aren't always binding. Especially if signed under duress. it sounds like a bunch of scary legalese but you can't actually give up your right to arbitration.
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>>772549
Yeah. He got them to pay for some of it but they spent a LOT of time in court and with lawyers and such.
>>
>>769255
>Even when soldering and about to clip a lead, check out where it can fly and whose unprotected eyes are nearby.
I once clipped some solder off a joint and it went flying into my eye. Luckily it landed bang on my tearduct - but it still stung a bit. Imagine that had hit the eyeball and/or gone behind...
>>
>>772577
>>went to emergency room with rock embedded in white of my eye.
>>mfw nurse tapped full safety goggles hanging from my neck and said, "You should have been wearing these."
>>
>>769459
>Is a pain in the ass when you got a blade guard and splitter all up in the way

You think that's a pain in the ass, try being strapped to a gurney and stuffed in the back of an ambulance like a leaky bag of meat. And some asshat keeps hitting you on the chest and shouting in your face when all you want to do is take a little nap. And they have the A/C cranked to max but won't even give you a blanket.

Now, THAT'S a pain in the ass. You'll find out at some point, I'm sure.
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>>769448
>Weariness and fatigue can kill. It is one of the things rarely mentioned in safety courses I've been in.

It was mentioned in every safety brief, course, or hazwoper recert I attended. And everybody had a story about getting hurt because stupid tired.

Mine was-
>second day of a 3 day nonstop emergency boiler install.
>finished soldering a joint, carefully turned the torch off, set it down.
>waited patiently for the workpiece to stop glowing.
>pick up work piece with bare hand to hand it to the guy waiting for it.
>sizzle and stench of burning flesh, I finally figure out PAIN, drop the piece.
>the guy was reaching for it, actually made a half-assed attempt to catch it.
>he'd been watching the whole time, knew it was hot.

When you're going on 30 hours on the job, you get really drifty. Especially when you're wearing shade 5 lenses a bunch. We both knew that piece was just below red heat.
>>
>>769459
Maybe the guard but never the splitter.
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