[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y ] [Search | Home]
4Archive logo
Cultural foods
If images are not shown try to refresh the page. If you like this website, please disable any AdBlock software!

You are currently reading a thread in /ck/ - Food & Cooking

Thread replies: 90
Thread images: 13
File: gormeh sabzi.jpg (695 KB, 3888x2592) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
gormeh sabzi.jpg
695 KB, 3888x2592
Whats your nationality/background?
Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
Does your family cook them regularly?
Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
What would your favourite dish from your culture be?

My parents are from iran but we live in Australia. I can cook a few dishes but not many, but I really love middle eastern cuisine. We go out to resturants every 2-3 weeks since we end up driving past auburn (arab suburb) for business. My favourite dish would probably be gormeh sabzi or khoresht bodemjoon. Naturally they're served with rice.
>>
And chelo kebab is pretty nice too.
>>
persian food can look like liquid shit but it sure tastes amazing
>>
American
I can cook up a mean pot of Kraft Easy Mac
>>
>>7338863
'Murica here, but Irish heritage
From what I've seen, Irish cuisine is mostly awful (I hate steamed cabbage)
If I had to pick something from my heritage, I suppose corned beef hash and eggs for breakfast since it is the breakfast of men and kings alike (also delicious)
>>
>>7338863
>Whats your nationality/background?
North German
>Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
Meh. I can make some of the simpler stuff, but I haven't given the more complex recipes a try because a) I'm a poor university fuck and b) I mostly don't like them.
>Does your family cook them regularly?
They cook them sometimes.
>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
When we go out, it's mostly Italian or Chinese cuisine.
>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
Poultry roasted in a "Roman pot" (a clay pot, that is). It is objectively the best method of roasting.
>>
>>7338884
Surely there must be more to your culture than that.

>>7338877
It tastes amazing.

>>7338903
I haven't seen much german cuisine. What's it like?

>>7338889
Isnt it mostly potato? Or am i mixing it up?
>>
I'm American, but my cultural heritage is German. I grew up in a town where (when I was a kid) everyone still spoke German, even in the shops (although it was an archaic form of German).
>Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
Yes, and Yes.
>Does your family cook them regularly?
Yes, and yes. Not as regularly as when my grandparents were alive, but regularly enough.
>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
Yes, and I miss my favorite german restaurant in my hometown so much.
>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
I've always had a hard-on for Koingsberger Klopse, but there's tons of other dishes I love as well; kasespatzle, sauerbraten, hot potato salad (made with bacon and a hot vinegar dressing), rohtkohl, gruenkohl, rahmkolrabi, I can't even name everything I love. When I was a little kid, my favorite dish was sweet rice or Milchreis. I'd eat it hot or cold, fresh or leftover, until there was no more left.
>>
>>7338904
>I haven't seen much german cuisine. What's it like?
Main courses are always one type of meat, one type of potato, and a vegetable side. For example, a venison roast with potato dumplings and braised red cabbage, or kale with bregenwurst and salted potatoes. The latter one is especially typical of the region.
Desserts are often yoghurt, pudding (milk thickened with starch, egg or semolina, or quark (a type of cottage cheese) sweetened and flavored with fruit, vanilla or chocolate.

We have a couple hundred types of bread, sausage and other cold cuts and a few dozen cheeses. Beer is a huge thing. We have about 1300 breweries and the type of beer produced varies by region. In the south, it's mostly lager and weissbier, around Cologne, it's Kölsch, and around these parts it's usually Pilsener.
People can buy beer at the age of 16 and it's connected to local identity. Many beer brands are named after the city in which they are or were originally produced.
>>
>>7338907
This made me curious. Where did you grow up and what kind of German did you speak?
>>
>>7338930
I grew up in Fredericksburg, Texas.
It's a VERY different town now, though. So many "auslanders" have moved in (because they loved the culture there), that it's become a caricature of itself. The old families are still there, but no one cares about them anymore, since the community was mainly an agricultural community, so that's still what the old families mostly do. All the new people who've moved in own bed and breakfasts, or stores on the Haupstrasse, and they only care about reeling in those tourist dollars.
Anyway, I can't tell you exactly what kind of German we spoke, it was old german, basically the same form of German that the settlers spoke when they came off the boat in the early 1800s. It's dying out now, as the older generation dies. My generation was the last to learn any german at home, and even now, I don't speak it as much as I did when I was younger. Apparently though, (according to my friends), when I'm really drunk, I speak (or yell) a lot in German, even though I don't really notice it myself, lol.
>>
>>7338942
It really is a pity that it's dying out. But I guess that's the fate of local dialects.
The 1800s aren't that long ago, so I'm guessing the language can't be that archaic. I assume that it's colored by the area from which the settlers orginially came though. Can you give me an example sentence in text or on vocaroo maybe?
>>
>Whats your nationality/background?
Finnish
>Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
Yes, and I haven't tried cooking all that many. Macaroni casserole and soups, at least.
>Does your family cook them regularly?
Just some, I guess. When it comes to hot meals, the aforementioned are probably some of the few things people eat/cook somewhat regularly. My dad prepares a lot of fish since we go fishing pretty regularly.
>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
I go to restaurants with my dad a couple of times a year, but our favorite restaurant is somewhat German-styled.
>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
To name a couple, I'll never get bored of gravlax on rye bread, or fish overall. Sautéed reindeer is also great. Mustamakkara (or black sausage) is divine when it's fresh and you have milk to go with it.
>>
>>7338954
> I assume that it's colored by the area from which the settlers orginially came though

Oh, I'm sure. I can tell you where we came from, we all came from Rhineland or Westphalia. My ancestors in particular came from Nassau. I still have relatives in Germany (AFAIK), they live in Dusseldorf. They used to come and visit when I was a kid.
>>
>Croation, english
>love having english dumplings with beef stew. Have mlinci for every big family gathering
>basic stuff i can make. But im garbage at filling sausages and wrapping cabbage rolls. But my korean gf was a natural at it, really made my grandma love her. Worked at a fish and chips shop though, so english food is fine.
>no restaurants serve it really.
>cabbage rolls are top tier.

I can actually make more chinese food than my own country food. My friends mom taught me a lot.
>>
>>7338863

Mixed race Polish/Lebanese. Came out looking whiter but I'm a mongrel and I don't mind. Often get mistaken for being Portugese or Italian. White women love it though. I can cook some traditional dishes. Not a whole lot. I know how to make perogies, bigos, cabbage rolls, stuff like that. On the other side, I'm familiar with making hummus, tabouleh, certain meat dishes. My family does not make them regularly to my knowledge. My parents were married for almost 40 years but ended up getting divorced like many couples do. Love traditional dishes especially on the Eastern European side. I live alone on campus and often cook for myself. I don't go out with my family much as I'm studying in university and away from them. Honestly if I had to choose just one dish, it would probably be bigos. It's just so good. I love to eat it with fresh bread or potatoes, even perogies. I always add lots of sausages and garlic and I'll leave it in the fridge for a couple days and it will taste even better.
>>
>>7339010
sarma/10
>>
Whats your nationality/background?
British/ Irish
Do you like your traditional dishes?
Yeah, was raised on boiled bacon and cabbage, as well as Sheppard's pie and stuff.
Can you cook them? Mostly yes, for the basic stuff, which in modern British cooking is most of it.
Does your family cook them regularly? My mum used to, but as my family got older and started moving out, family sized meals weren't viable so she doesn't now.
Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants? Restaurants don't fucking sell English food here. You'd be hard pressed to find a pub that had more than 3 English menu items.
What would your favourite dish from your culture be? Liver and bacon, or steak and kidney pie.

Lets be honest though. English food in this day and age is all fucking WWII ration food, I've never had a pigeon pie or rabbit stew, traditional british food,and you cant really go out and eat that stuff anywhere because even if you go into a nice rural pub, you're still only going to get a fucking lasagne. Fuck Britain and its cultural self loathing.
>>
>>7338863
>Whats your nationality/background?
Scottish, with Irish grandparents

>Do you like your traditional dishes?
Most of them

>Can you cook them?
I can cook a fair number of them

>Does your family cook them regularly?
Not all that often, maybe once a week

>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
No, usually go to more ethnic places if i'm eating out

>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
Haggis, neeps and tatties.
>>
>>7339063
Haggis neeps and tatties is great. Fucking love me some scallops and shit when I'm way, way up north by skye.
>>
>>7338904
Potatoes are Irish for sure, but that's a side dish
>baked potato with butter, sour cream and chives is unbeatable alongside a steak, though
>>
>>7339106
Potato isn't a side dish when you're Irish.
>>
>>7338863
>Whats your nationality/background?
Irish/Scot

>Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
Other than a Shepherd's pie that is probably completely butchered, no.

>Does your family cook them regularly?
Negative, we're pretty American. Been here a bunch of generations so its not like we have family over there.

>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
No, not many places that serve that kind of food in my city. Honestly, I live in the South of the US and I identify more with southern food culture than anything else.
>>
>>7339106
>Potatoes are Irish for sure, but that's a side dish
Plastic Paddy detected.

>>7338863
I'm Irish(not "Irish-American", but an actual Irish Person).
It depends on the dish, really. Skirt and kidney stew or a traditional Irish Breakfast with Hot Soda Bread, lashings of butter and a strong cup of tea are my favourite foods. I can cook both of them but I prefer my nana's stew. I don't know what she does to it but it tastes 1000% better when she makes it(but I think it's true for a lot of food cooked by nana's).
My family cooks Irish food most of the time, but sometimes that can get boring. For restaurants, we prefer to try foods from different cultures(mainly chinese and italian). I'm trying to get my family to try other foods(like Indian etc.) which is going ok.
>>
File: 4.jpg (168 KB, 1600x1067) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
4.jpg
168 KB, 1600x1067
I'm half iranian and i live in Switzerland. I love my traditional dishes, but I never tried to cook them.
My mother cook traditional dishes twice a week.
I usually eat at home because my parents can cook very well!
My favorite dish is Zereshk Polo.
>>
I am American, my family's heritage is a blend of British and Scandinavian.

We have shit cuisine so I make other foods.
>>
>>7338863
>Whats your nationality/background?
Black American from Louisiana and Alabama
>Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
Of course and no
>Does your family cook them regularly?
Only on holidays
>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
No, it's always terrible
>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
Gumbo and fresh steaming rice. Nothing is better desu.
>>
>>7338863
Aisian.
Emigrated from FATA with my family when I was 3.
I like making stuff from back home such as rice haleem, chapli kabab, tika, and motton karahi.
>>
>>7339151
Op here, zereshk polo is unfortunately one of the few traditional foods i didnt develop a taste for.
I love all the khoresht though.
You ever have bastani falideh?
>>
>>7339155
Why'd you guys move?
>>
File: 4aH5GHe.png (301 KB, 393x355) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
4aH5GHe.png
301 KB, 393x355
>>7339151
what is this dish.

Is that cranberries?
>>
>>7339010
Kulen and sir i vrhnje (cottage cheese with sour cream)
>>
>>7339166
I think they are Berberis
>>
>>7339166
>The literal Translation of this recipe would be Zereshk (Barberry) Polo (Rice) O (and) Morgh (chicken).
>>
>>7338863
>no dried lemons
Baba jan...
>>
>>7339163
The Taliban started encroaching on the FATA so we got out.
>>
>>7339125
So your nationality and background is American then. You've lost all connection to your heritage in Ireland and Scotland if you don't connect socially/ culturally to your roots.
>>
>>7338863
>Whats your nationality/background?
Southern portuguese
>Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
Yes, and yes, but to be honest the staple here is grilled fish and seafood, not really hard to cook
>Does your family cook them regularly?
Yes, dont live with them but the meals there depend on whats fresh in the fish market
>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
Yes, when I go visit we go often
>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
maybe fried baby sardines or (like really small you can eat them with the bones) with tomato rice ang algarvian salad(bell peppers onion tomato and cucumber)
>>
>>7339158
No! Is it good?
I only had Bastani Sonnati.
Do you like Zoolbia Bamieh?
>>
Apparently irish corned beef is a thing, but I've never eaten it

Irish food is pretty plain, beef stew, lamb pies, boiled root veg. I eat a lot of roasted parsnips and pot roast.
>>
>>7338863
I can cook burgers, but really doesn't take much skill to cook American Cuisine.. Just remeber the basic rule, the more fat the better.. At least thats what McDonald's seems to think
>>
>>7338863
>Whats your nationality/background?
American. Southern American.

>Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
Absolutely. I've lived in the south all my life, and we've always had a mix of classic southern dishes mixed with the same shit everybody else eats. We smoke, cure and grill a lot of our proteins, and we use a lot of cayenne and chili peppers to season our foods.

>Does your family cook them regularly?
Pretty much, though we've stopped using a lot of the fats we used to use, and we don't eat a lot of the battered and fried shit people associate with the south.

>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
Nope. The only reason we'll eat out is for something we don't already make, like pizza, or Chinese.

>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?

Hickory smoked pulled pork with a side of sauted spinach, tomato, chili, black eyed peas, and corn bread.
>>
>Whats your nationality/background?
Chinese

Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
I can't cook Chinese food for shit but I love it.

Does your family cook them regularly?
Yes, we never ate anything but Chinese food except for pasta sometimes.

Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
Whenever I'm home, yeah. Usually Chinese, but occasionally Japanese or Italian.

What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
Mapo tofu or sheng jian bao, but if I'm high as fuck then a shit ton of orange chicken with rice is literally heaven.

inb4 ORANGE CHICKEN ISNT REAL CHINESE FOOD

Nigga I don't give a fuck, that shit is delicious.
>>
>Whats your nationality/background?
Midwestern American
Do you like your traditional dishes?
Absolutely
Can you cook them?
The more basic ones
Does your family cook them
regularly?
A coiled times a month when we're together
Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
Occasionally
What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
If bacon cheese burgers don't count as Midwestern then I'd say chicken fried steak
>>
>>7340055
Shit actually KC BBQ pulled pork sandwiches might be my favorite
>>
>muh authenticity
Why would you eat any of this shit, it looks like something a poor african would eat. Fucking hipsters never learn.
>>
>>7339151
Not even remotely iranian, but I fucking love zereshk polow. It's one of my favorite foods.
>>
>>7340095
Honestly, I'm a self-hating Iranian and I think that Iranian food is really, truly amazing. I went through my rebellious, hipster phase and barely cook it at home but I really do miss grandma's cooking.

It's just filling, pretty clean-tasting, savoury and delicious. Nothing to complain about, ever.
>>
>>7340138
What dishes would you recommend to someone new to iranian cuisine?
>>
>>7340143
Ghormeh Sabzi (in OP) and Gheimeh are best. My favourite is Tahchin.

google tahchin blog tumeric and saffron

They're not easy to make though, keep in mind.
>>
>>7340143
It depends, what do you like?
Salty, sweet, salty or sour?
>>
File: url.jpg (11 KB, 286x176) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
url.jpg
11 KB, 286x176
>Whats your nationality/background?
Maltese
>Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
For the most part yes. I can cook quite a few dishes. Pastizzi take a long time to make but are worth it. Ghagin il-forn is a super simple dish kind of like lasagna. I've wanted to learn to make Ġbejna (fresh cheese) but haven't yet. Brodu is a super easy soup I make often as it reminds me of when I was little.
>Does your family cook them regularly?
My father cooks Maltese dishes occasionally. He makes great pastizzi.
>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
Nah. Haven't found any Maltese restaurants in Toronto. Only a few bakeries.
>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
Corned beef and pea Pastizz. Qagħaq tal-ħmira were pretty great when my nana made them. Very good with coffee.
>>
>>7340169
I felt in love 2 years ago with Khoresht Aloo
>>
>Whats your nationality/background?
American: New Jersey
Live in a commercial fishing family. Dad, Uncles, Cousins, Grandfather are/were all commercial fisherman

Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
Nothing real traditional here. We are influenced by NY and Philly. I live in a fishing town though so we have access to off the boat seafood of all kinds. Including what I catch on my own.

>Does your family cook them regularly?
Yes. Although my mom and dad suck at it. They make enjoyable food but nothing off the wall. I have no shame in saying I'm the best cook in my family.

>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
I don't eat my family.
But yes, my parents are getting older so they have been much more inclined to just say, "fuck it, lets eat out." No complaints, I get free meals.

>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
From my culture? uhm. that's tough because I really like all seafood. Right now I'm on an oyster/muscle kick so I'll just say that. not really a dish but its because we are prone to just pulling shit out of the water, cleaning/cooking and eating it.
>>
>>7340186
Aloo polo o morgh, you mean.

Yeah it's sour and tasty.

I dunno, like I said, I'm a self-hating Iranian but I really do rate Iranian food. Easy mouthfeel, no weird or randomly extreme foods (raw meats, extremely bitter/spicy/smelly, etc.), hard as fuck to make so the women stay out of the way, etc.

top3 cuisine in the world as far as I'm concerned.
>>
>Whats your nationality/background?
Scottish; but there's already a Scot or two in this thread so let's be specific and say Glasgow, home of alcohol abuse and obesity.

>Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
Traditional here is a greek kebab at 3am, or chips with cheese and curry sauce. I can cook neither - it loses something when a syrian refugee isn't serving it to you in broken english while your friend vomits outside.

>Does your family cook them regularly?
I see my family once a week, literally for takeaway. We always get fish and chips, basically, cos the takeaway in my home town is amazing.

>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
When we go out it's usually an Indian, and it's amazing.

>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
Chicken balmoral is pretty baller - basically haggis inside a chicken breast, bacon optional.
>>
>>7340174
Anything but sour. One of the reasons it took me a while to get into middle eastern food or even greek was how sour a lot of it is.
>>
German
Yes, quite a few (Gulasch, Rotkohl, Grunkohl, Sauerkraut Bratkartoffeln, Kartoffelsuppe, Erbsensuppe....)
Yes
My wifes Grandparents do
Sauerfleisch mit Remulade und Bratkartoffeln
>>
File: 03_sauerfleisch[1].jpg (95 KB, 1024x618) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
03_sauerfleisch[1].jpg
95 KB, 1024x618
>>7340224
Forgot picture of fav dish
>>
>>7339153

>southern
>black
>desu

Is it hard to be you?
>>
>>7340194
>hard as fuck to make so the women stay out of the way, etc.
typical
>>
The furthest I can trace my roots back to an English fellow who came from Cornwall to the Massachusetts bay colony in the 1620s, but I've got Irish and Scottish and French and Native American and Basque and probably lots of other shit I don't know about all mixed in.

>tfw New England mutt with no culture ;_;
>>
>>7340279
Baked beans, fiddleheads, lobster roll and canned bread
>>
>>7340279
>>tfw New England mutt with no culture
>no culture
>New England clam chowder
>Maine lobster
>Boston baked beans

That's just some of the shit off the top of my head that I've heard of down here in the south.


The liberals sure do brainwash you yankee's, don't they?
>>
Italian-American.
I fucking love Italian food.
I can only cook baked ziti so far, but I've helped my pops prepare cheese ravioli, spaghetti, and meatballs before.
We don't cook them as much anymore because pops is trying to do a low-carb diet, but we still have them from time to time.
Occasionally we'll go out to eat, usually to Olive Garden because my grandma likes it, but it's just not the same.
My favorite dish is homemade meatballs and whatever pasta we decide to have with it. Stereotypical, I know, but I can't help it-- I love it anyway.
>>
>>7340341
>yankee's

Our what, anon?
>>
>>7340341
Worceter, Ma here. Stuffies, baked stuffed lobster, corn chowder, clam chowder, english beef stew, harrows chicken PIES SON.
>>
>>7340382
>a lot of people like olive garden
>but i dont
>that means it sucks

tastes good to me, fag!
>>
File: csulkos-bableves.jpg (204 KB, 1100x733) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
csulkos-bableves.jpg
204 KB, 1100x733
>>7338863
>Whats your nationality/background?
Hungarian
>Do you like your traditional dishes?
With a few exceptions such as pig's knuckle and/or tripe stew, yes.
>Can you cook them?
Quite a few of them, but not nearly all. Some are only possible to prepare over an open fire in a cauldron, I usually lack both.
>Does your family cook them regularly?
Yep.
>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
No, that'd be weird. I do sometimes order something traditional from the menu, especially dishes I can't really get ingredients for because they're rare or expensive.
>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
Tojásos nokedli, probaly the simplest dish there is. It's small dumplings fried with eggs, always served with green salad and vinaigrette. Jókai bableves (pic related) would be a close second, a hearty bean soup with sausage, served piping hot over sliced onion and topped with sour cream.
>>
>>7339367
It's really good
And yes.
>>
>Whats your nationality/background?
Italian-American. Mostly American.
>Do you like your traditional dishes?
I like most Italian food, and some southern American food.
>Can you cook them?
I'm pretty successful when I try at least.
>Does your family cook them regularly?
Nope. No one really cooks in my family. We do a traditional Italian Christmas which we all really like however.
>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
No. Most Italian joints are terrible in my experience.
>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
I'm not very experienced with traditional dishes. I really love fra diavolo; it combines my two favorite things: spiciness and shrimp.
>>
> Nationality
England

> Do you like your traditional dishes?
Love 'em

> Can you cook them?
Some of them, yes

> Does your family cook them regularly?
Used to have a Sunday Roast every weekend back when I still lived with them. It was always brilliant.

> Favourite dish from your culture
Okay it's impossible to pick just one so here we go. Fish and Chips, meat pies, pasties, Roast meat (lamb or rabbit) with gravy, Yorkshire pudding, and veg, pie and Chips, pie and mash, toad in the hole, curry, sausage rolls, pork pies, shortbread.....
You guys get the idea
>>
File: original.jpg (44 KB, 640x480) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
original.jpg
44 KB, 640x480
>Nationality
Finnish
>Traditional dishes?
Peasoup, sauteed reindeer and karelian stew and pies are great.
>Does your family cook them regularly?
I cook by myself
>Do you go out with family to eat them in restaurants?
No. If I want Finnish food, it's not too hard to get ingredients for them
>Favorite dish from culture
Sauteed reindeer with lingonberries and sliced pickles, mashed potatoes with local herbs and karelian pies with a spread made of butter and hard eggs served with a side of rye bread and lagers.
>>
>Whats your nationality/background?
Puerto Rican and Czech

>Do you like your traditional dishes?
Fuck YES. Who doesn't like roast pork, dumplings, spanish rice, stews, and fried starches?

>Can you cook them?
Yes to both. I usually cook more Puerto Rican food than Czech, but I can do both no problem. Also, Caribbean ingredients are easier to get ahold of than some of the European ones.

>Does your family cook them regularly?
Yes. Well, I don't have much contact with my PR side of the family, but for every holiday, my family eats a ton of Czech food. One of my favorite Christmas presents is the loaf of vánočka my cousins bake for everyone.

>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
No. There aren't a lot of Czech or PR restaurants in the US. None where I live. I go to Polish, Hungarian, Mexican, Colombian and Salvadoran restaurants a lot though. There is some overlap.

>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
Czech: Guláš (goulash) or vepřo knedlo zelo (pork, dumplings, and cabbage)
PR: Pernil (roast pork shoulder, lots of crackling).
>>
File: Jesus approves.jpg (28 KB, 400x400) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Jesus approves.jpg
28 KB, 400x400
>>7341110
>Czech: Guláš (goulash) or vepřo knedlo zelo (pork, dumplings, and cabbage)
>PR: Pernil (roast pork shoulder, lots of crackling).

Anyone down with swine, in my book is fine.
>>
>>7340341
>>7340328

I'm a Vermonter and those things are irrelevant here. I do make my own maple syrup, actually, so perhaps that's what I should have said in the first place.
>>
>Whats your nationality/background?
Born in Indonesia, now living in the US (Texas).

>Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
I love it. Can only cook a few basic dishes, like grilling satay or making nasi goreng (fried rice). Trying to get my mom to teach me how to make more complicated ones.

>Does your family cook them regularly?
Yeah, my mom cooks every day. She makes the best rendang I've ever had. Dad is pretty good at cooking too.

>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
Whenever I visit my parents I'd just eat home cooked food. I eat out a lot otherwise though.

>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?

Probably Satay, of whatever meat. I can just down those bastards till it's all gone.
>>
>Whats your nationality/background?
American
>Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
Yeah I'm from NC so you can't go wrong with barbecue, my family owned a little mom 'n pop restaurant for nearly 50 years so I know how to cook a hog
>Does your family cook them regularly?
Not as much as we used to, dad got tired of working in the old restaurant and sold it in the early 2000s. After he passed away the heart kinda went out of the cooking, although we do occasionally whip up some of granddad's barbecue sauce and grill chicken or ribs
>Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
Yeah my mom's a shitty cook but she's got good taste in restaurants
What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
Probably brunswick stew
>>
>>7340224
>Gulasch
>German
>>
>>7342431
babi satay?
>>
File: Brunswick-Stew.jpg (115 KB, 600x400) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
Brunswick-Stew.jpg
115 KB, 600x400
>>7342441
Classic Southern Dish
{Yumm}
>>
>>7342910
That looks awesome, do you have a recipe?
>>
>Whats your nationality/background?
First Nations and Inuit

>Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
I like some of the traditional food. I can cook Indian tacos, caribou stew and arctic char jerky. Most of it is weird like raw shit.

>Does your family cook them regularly?
Yes my grandparents cook traditional food most of the time.


>Do you go out with family to eat them in restaurants?
Yes on special occasions.

>What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
Indian Tacos with fry bread. I only treat myself with it.
>>
File: sarmale.jpg (220 KB, 800x532) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
sarmale.jpg
220 KB, 800x532
>>7340456
Magyar zene!
You forgot the staples of Gulash and Paprikash!
>>7338863
Whats your nationality/background?
Romanian
Do you like your traditional dishes?
Most of them yeah.
Can you cook them?
A few. The most basic.
Does your family cook them regularly?
Yes
Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
Pretty much have to agree with Magyar anon.

What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
Sarmale. Very convenient, in that i can receive them in a package uncooked, just assembled, stick them in the freezer and take them out whenever to cook them, and i get that home cooked meal food without having to go to any trouble except putting them over the fire.
But I dont think this is limited to Romania. I am pretty sure the whole area around us has them, found a pic with a vegy recipe showing a cross section.
>>
>>7344634
http://www.lemonythyme.com/brunswick-stew/
>>
File: pastitsio.jpg (68 KB, 300x300) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
pastitsio.jpg
68 KB, 300x300
>>7338863
Greek
Love half, hate the other half
Yes
Yes
Pastitsio
>>
>>7338863
Whats your nationality/background?
Puerto Rican
Do you like your traditional dishes? Can you cook them?
Most of them minus anything with gandules or bacalao. For the most part yes, I just haven't gotten my mom's recipe for pasteles yet.
Does your family cook them regularly?
Not as often now since I don't have as much time as I did.
Do you go out with family to eat them in resturants?
No, but Benny's seafood resturant in Miami was the only specifically themed Puerto Rican resturant I remember going to, and that was when I was in elementary school. The mofongo is some of the greatest stuff you'll ever have.
What would your favourite dish from your culture be?
Sorullitos. Easy to make, great comfort food and goes with just about any meat.

While the island and it's people and politics are complete shit, at least the food is good.
>>
white anglo Canadian

I don't like most of my senpai's 'traditional' dishes which are just like bland generic amerifood. one recipe I do like is 'moose balls', which is rice-and-meatballs pressure cooked in tomato sauce - essentially cabbage rolls with no cabbage.

my parents presumably do still cook all that boring shit, I don't know, I don't live with them. when my mom comes to visit she always wants to go out for vietnamese vermicelli bowls.

my absolute favorite dull white amerifood cuisine though is definitely white person taco night. crispy shells from a box, shredded cheddar, ground beef, iceberg lettuce, all that shit. yes. so good.
>>
potatoes

my gramma's 80+ and about to die

i love her to death

she knows EVERYTHING about fucking potatoes
>>
>>7345082

Holy fuck I love that stuff. Haven't eaten it for 20 years since I was last in Greece. Memorable food.
Thread replies: 90
Thread images: 13
Thread DB ID: 486507



[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Home]

[Boards: 3 / a / aco / adv / an / asp / b / biz / c / cgl / ck / cm / co / d / diy / e / fa / fit / g / gd / gif / h / hc / his / hm / hr / i / ic / int / jp / k / lgbt / lit / m / mlp / mu / n / news / o / out / p / po / pol / qa / qst / r / r9k / s / s4s / sci / soc / sp / t / tg / toy / trash / trv / tv / u / v / vg / vp / vr / w / wg / wsg / wsr / x / y] [Search | Home]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.
This is a 4chan archive - all of the shown content originated from that site. This means that 4Archive shows their content, archived. If you need information for a Poster - contact them.
If a post contains personal/copyrighted/illegal content, then use the post's [Report] link! If a post is not removed within 24h contact me at wtabusse@gmail.com with the post's information.