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I can't get rust off.
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You are currently reading a thread in /ck/ - Food & Cooking

Thread replies: 117
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I have a brand new cast iron pan. I ran it through the oven self clean to strip the old seasoning. I thoroughly scrubbed all the rusted remains off. Immediately wiped it dry and covered with a thin layer of flax oil. Baked it in the oven at 550 for an hour. It still has a bunch of rust on it. I followed exact instructions, what went wrong?
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>>7335504

> I ran it through the oven self clean to strip the old seasoning
> why strip old seasoning instead of putting new on top of it
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>>7335945

Seasoning is supposed to be a very thin layer. Building up a thick layer isn't seasoning, it's a dirty pan.
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>>7335504
OP, can you be more specific about exactly what you did?

Running the pan through the self-clean cycle will strip off food, grease, etc. However it will not remove rust.

If your pan was rusty when you got it then then you need to remove the rust by other means before you season it.

If your pan was truly rust-free before you started seasoning it then it doesn't make any sense that it rusted in an hour. You either didn't remove all the rust first, or you did something else afterwards that you aren't mentioning.
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>>7335958
I'm aware that it won't remove rust. It was a brand new pre seasoned pan. Unless there's a layer of rust under the factory seasoning, then idk. After the self clean cycle, it was coated with rust. I literally spent half an hour scrubbing with steel wool so all the rust should have been removed. Everything google said said to bake at 200 degrees for 15 minutes after the cleaning. I did that but it created another layer of rust. I scrubbed it clean yet again but this time, I immediately wiped it dry and applied oil and immediately put it in the 550 degree oven for an hour. This latest result is what I'm posting about. It's not as bad as no oil but there's still a ton of rust everywhere.
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>>7335990
Wait, why would you buy a rusty pan in the first place? If it was pre-seasoned and brand new, there's no way it was already rusty.

Something here just doesn't add up.
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>>7335999
It was branded new and black coated and seasoned when it arrived. It was covered with rust/grime after the self clean cycle. I should add that after steel wool scrubbing, the pan was greyish, not black or rust colored. I'm pretty sure I scrubbed it down to the bare iron. The rust just came back that quickly. I don't get it either.
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>>7336009
why would you remove the seasoning on a brand new pre-seasoned pan?
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>>7335990

you bought a pre-seasoned pan. Why didn't you just use it as-is?

Assuming the pan was rust-free when you started and then came out rusty after the self-clean cycle then there is one of two possibilities:

1) There is moisture in your oven. (is it gas oven, by chance? combustion creates water vapor as you learned back in high school chem class)

2) You did something else after the self-clean cycle, like letting the pan sit around long enough to rust on its own, but aren't telling us what. Bare iron rusts very quickly so once you strip the seasoning you must oil it RIGHT AWAY before it flash rusts.

>>said to bake at 200 degrees for 15 minutes after the cleaning

That's retarded, unless they are talking 200 Celcius. You ought to learn how the seasoning process works rather than blindly following directions. It goes like this:
1) get the pan to bare metal (sanding, self-clean cycle, etc.)
2) apply food-safe oil before the pan rusts
3) heat the pan until the oil polymerizes into a hard black layer. This requires high heat and a long time. 1 hour might not be long enough. Don't blindly follow directions, look at what's happening and adjust accordingly.

If the pan is rusty you need to start over at step 1. If the pan is sticky or isn't BLACK then you need to heat it longer. Ovens, etc, vary. 1 hour may not be long enough. Proper seasoning should be rock-hard (not sticky or greasy) and black in color.
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Shit neger, why would you even do that. Just place it on the stove with water, boil it up and then rub it up with olive oil
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>>7336143

What exactly does the water do, other than nothing?
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>>7335521
>>7335945
What's the problem?
I run cast iron through my oven's cleaning cycle whenever I get an old pan that has ancient seasoning build up on it, and it always works like a charm. I've done about 12 pieces that way, and then reseasoned from scratch, and they're in perfect condition.
IDK if perhaps it depends on the oven. I have a gas oven, IDK if that makes a difference in the cleaning cycle or not, but it works great for me.

As far as rust goes, you need some hard elbow grease and some steel wool, before running through the oven cleaning cycle, and then again after, before reseasoning.
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>>7336009
Rust will always show up quickly on the bare iron. That's why you need to be prepared to start the seasoning process right after you strip it.
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Can someone explain to me what seasoning is in this context?
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>>7336156
It shows that the pan is hot enough by boiling. I suspect anon is Scandinavian
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>>7336182
Creating a protective tar layer on top of the cast iron to protect it from rusting.
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>>7336182
a layer of carbon that coat the iron and form a protective surface
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>>7336186
Using a cast iron skillet seems like too much trouble to me, why not just use a normal pan?
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>>7336194
After it's seasoned, there's almost no maintenance whatsoever as long as you don't do something dumb like scrub it with steel wool
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>>7336194
Well maintained it can last you a lifetime. I use one i inherited from my grandmother. Also, marginally better heat leading for crisp surfaces
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>>7336194
It really isn't any work at all once you know how to care about cast iron.

It's just as easy as taking care of a pet rock
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>>7336194

It's really not any trouble at all, except:
-some people like to overdo their hobbies and make things as complicated as possible
-some people fuck up

>>why not use a normal pan
different tools for different jobs. cast iron pans retain a great deal of heat so they provide a much stronger sear than you would get with a typical aluminum pan. they can also be heated to higher temperatures without fear of damaging the coating. They also make fantastic bakeware as they are 100% oven safe, plus the black color soaks up the radiant heat from the oven better than glass or a shiny pan. finally, they are indestructible. many people own cast iron pans that are generations old. buy one and you'll never have to replace it.
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>>7336194
If you have to ask, then you've never used one.
Cast iron is indestructable, maintains an even heat, heats up quickly, cooks evenly, and is pretty much non-stick if you've seasoned it well or it's been used for years. Cast iron pans will outlast your own life. I have pans that belonged to my great grandmother, that are smooth as obsidian and nothing sticks to them. Cast iron is great.
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>>7336182
The seasoning is a polymerized coating of cooking oil on the surface of a cast iron pan. It seals the metal against rust, and provides a fairly non-stick, smooth surface if done properly. It is like a very hard, heat-resistant, food-safe plastic that's tough enough to resist acids, soap, abrasions, and scrapes when it is thick enough. It is not as non-stick as teflon, but it is much loner-lasting and more durable. It is done by coating a perfectly clean, dry grey cast iron pan (this is the natural color) in a thin layer of oil, heating it in a very hot oven just up to the smoke point of the oil, and holding it until every that'll burn off (under 400ºF) will. This process is repeated 5+ times until the "seasoning" is shiny and makes the pan appear black. You do multiple light coats for the same reason you spray paint in light coats. It makes it more even (no bumps to scratch off with metal utensils), and ensures each successive coat sets thoroughly polymerized and hard.
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Thanks for the answers m8s, learned something new
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>>7336024
Electric oven. Also, read my post, the second time around, I oiled at put it in the oven the second I finished cleaning yet it still rusted.
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>>7336272

Was the pan dry before you applied the oil or could it have been wet from you cleaning it?
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>>7336289
I wiped it dry with a paper towel, then immediately applied oil and rubbed it all over.
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>>7336293

OK, you wiped it. But was it really dry? Or could it still have been damp?
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File: rust.jpg (2 MB, 4032x3024) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
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Picture related is what it looks like after the steps I went through.

>>7336297
The only other option after wiping was oven drying which I tried the first time around produced a ton of rust. I guess wiping then oven drying is worth a try but I'm thinking the result will be the same.
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Try CLR and Bartender's Friend, not at the same time.
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>>7336311
You could always go for broke and get the things sand blasted for what $5? Then start from stratch and make a proper patina.
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One last try. Going to wipe, then oven dry. If that doesn't work, probably going to sledgehammer the pan and lid out of spite, then toss them, then leave bad reviews on Amazon.

>>7336314
I actually do have Barkeeper's friend. It makes my SS pans like new. But SS is smooth and shiny. Not seeing how it works with cast iron.

>>7336323
I scrubbed with steel wool for half an hour, two times to boot. Each time, the iron was grey and metallic looking. I'm pretty sure I got it down to bare iron.
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>>7336311

Thanks, that post made it clear. the pan is rusting because you haven't gotten all the old rust off yet! You can clearly see rust in that photo!

you also may not be applying enough oil. I can see for damn sure that you'd didn't get any oil in the "E" on the lid.

>>7336323
I would not recommend sandblasting, unless the place you use specializes in delicate things. Most industrial sandblasters use a very coarse blasting media. It will get rid of the rust but it will leave a very rough surface behind.
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>>7336339
>Not seeing how it works with cast iron.

It's an abrasive, albeit a mild one. It will work on anything.

>>Steel wool
Bad choice. Use fine sandpaper. Not only will it do the job in a fraction of the time, but it will remove more of the surface rust.
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>>7336354
How did I not get all the rust off if I scrubbed for half an hour and got it to a metallic color? Also, I made sure to get every inch covered with oil.

>>7336362
I have 120/240/400 grit, which to use?
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>>7336311
Keep using the steel wool. And let the pan air dry next time.

And FFS dont use the oven self clean, its too hot and too long
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>>7336339
The pans are cast iron, you can't really harm them so try out Barkeeper's Friend. You're not going to hurt cast iron.
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>>7336354
Delicate?
A cast iron skillet is not delicate.
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>>7336374
>How did I not get all the rust off

I don't know. But given what you described it's the only possible explanation.

Also, steel wool is not very good for removing rust. You want something harder than the material you are trying to remove. Steel wool is not as hard as iron oxide (aka rust). That's why it took so long. Wrong tool for the job.

>>Also, I made sure to get every inch covered with oil.

I think you are mistaken. Either that, or your coat of oil was amazingly thin.

>>which grit
400 should be fine.
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>>7336354
Rough surface? Who cares, that's the point of making a proper patina on it afterwards.
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>>7336454

I know an iron skillet is not delicate. Perhaps I ought to explain in more detail:

I work in the metalworking industry--in fact, I own a machine shop. Working with metal is what I do every day. I have a small sandblast cabinet in my shop but for larger parts we send them out to others who have larger equipment. That's probably what Anon might do since I doubt he owns a sandblaster. The places you find in the phone book or on google are large industrial shops. Their main work are things like vehicle frames or large industrial weldments. They use very coarse abrasive media. The resulting surface (After sandblasting) is very rough to the touch. It literally feels like sandpaper. That's fine for most industrial parts because the next step will be to either plate it with a different metal or to paint it, either one will result in a smooth surface. But a skillet is different. You want the surface as smooth as it can be so food doesn't stick to it. Thus, using an industrial sandblasting shop is a bad idea.

The reason I mentioned "delicate" is because some sandblasting shops specialize in things like auto restoration. They use a more gentle media, like glass bead, crushed walnut shells, baking soda (no, really), or even dry ice. Those are specially made not to roughen up the surface as much, and that would be OK for a pan used to cook food on.

It's not that an industrial sandblaster will ruin the pan (of course not). But it will leave behind a less-then-ideal finish which will make food tend to stick worse.
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>>7336489
I understand what you're saying but that's why a patina is made afterwards. Nobody cooks on a fresh cast iron skillet. The point of the patina is to make the finish and takes care of rough stuff for lack of a technical term.
>>
>take brand new pan
>fuck it up
>wwhat went wrong?
This is fucking eepic shitposting OP. YOUR a FUCKING MADMAN!
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>>7336501

Not really. The point of the seasoning is to form a hard coating that prevents the pan from rusting and to prevent the food from sticking. It is NOT meant to be a thick layer that fills in gaps. And you would be surprised how rough a finish will be left by an industrial sandblaster.

I'm not saying don't sandblast the skillet. I'm saying make sure the shop you choose for the job uses a fine media and not the same thing he uses on derricks for the oilfield.
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>>7336517
I didn't say it was a thick layer of sludge or whatever you're asserting.
A patina is what it is. It takes time to make one, then your cast iron skillet will last generations, unless of course it rusts, then rinse and repeat.
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>>7336526

A patina is only a few microns thick. It will do nothing to address a rough surface.

All I'm saying is that if anon wants to sandblast his skillet it would be preferable to choose a shop that won't make it rougher than it already is. Do you honestly disagree with that for some reason?
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Plus you can use a cast iron skillet in a zombie invasion, take one of those to the head of a zombie or crackhead and it wont be coming back for long.

It's multipurpose. Cooking instrument and weapon.
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>>7336542
That's the point. You're cooking on the patina and not the iron surface.
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>>7336542
I do disagree. Making a proper patina on a cast iron skillet will fill in those holes and create the cooking surface.
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>>7336557

Sure, But that surface would be rough, which tends to make food stick regardless of patina. Why do that if you can easily avoid it?
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>>7336574
You're missing the point, after it has a patina it wont be rough.
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>>7336374
>How did I not get all the rust off if I scrubbed for half an hour and got it to a metallic color?

I'm confused. Do you mean the your picture in
>>7336311
is supposed to be free of rust, oiled, and about to be baked, or is that after you fucked everything up and it's rusty? Because if you think that's free of rust, you don't understand what rust is. That's covered with rust and not evenly oiled.

Are you ever letting water touch the bare metal? You've made a couple minor mentions of drying the pan, and drying it with a paper towel, but it would always be dry if you just did what you said you did.
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>>7336581

It will be rough because the patina isn't thick enough to alter the roughness.
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>>7336587
Incorrect.
If the patina is made properly then the carbon layer settles in and then it's quite fine.
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>>7336584
Another point for why I'm sure I got all the rust off. Eventually as I scrubbed. The water ran black, not orange. After that, I wiped dry, oiled, put in the oven at 550 for an hour. Picture related was after all of that, after the oiling and baking, that new rust formed.
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The point of a patina, the definition of it is that it's carbon surface, for cooking if done right on a cast iron skillet it'll be smooth as glass.
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>>7336618
You should bake the fucker while replacing the oil every hour or so and do it about 450F, put some foil something down to catch the dripping oil because it will drip and you don't want to start a fire.

Rotate the fucker from time to time.
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>>7336602
Your grasp of terminology is poor then.

A patina is only a few microns thick. It's simply an oxidisation of the surface of the metal. It has nothing to do with carbon and it certainly dones't "settle in".

A properly seasoned pan does not contain anything that fills gaps. That's a dirty-ass improperly kept pan.

Seasoning a pan has nothing to do with "a carbon layer". Nor does it settle into anything.

There are two parts to seasoning:
1) converting the surface layer of the skillet from Fe2O3 to Fe3O4. That is where the black color comes from. This has no effect on the texture of the surface of the pan.

2) Creating a layer of polymerized oil on top of the Fe3O4. This is what helps keep the pan non-stick. This layer will have some thickness and it will fill in very minor (e.g. microscopic) surface imperfections. But it won't fill in the roughness left behind by industrial sandblasting.

If you want to learn more about this there's an excellent section in Modernist Cuisine.
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>>7336634
We have agree to disagree.

I doesn't have to be more than microns thick, it has to create the cooking surface. Are you being a weirdo for the sake of it, because it's coming across that way.

I told you how to do this. So be done with it.
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>>7336634
>Modernist Cuisine
Faggot detected
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>>7336643
>We have agree to disagree.

No, you need to go back to chemistry class and understand what these terms are that you're throwing around.

>>Are you being a weirdo for the sake of it, because it's coming across that way.
No, as I mentioned before I work with metal every day. I know how this stuff works. Meanwhile you are throwing around words without knowing what they actually mean or what the seasoning process actually does on a chemical level, and even when your errors are pointed out you seem to refuse to research it further.

>>I told you how to do this
Your advice on how to season was good. Your understanding of how the process actually works is not.
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>>7336656
Seasoning is the process of making a patina. Look that one up expert d00d.
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>>7336311
ffs just wipe it down with oily rags until the oil wipes away clean and run it through some more oven time
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>>7336696
Uhm, no.

Read >>7336634 again.
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>>7336728
Not that poster
Enough layers of oil would smooth it out
Work any cast iron surface in a food service setting, and you will see a considerably thick surface develop after a few busy shifts
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>>7336726
This.

You don't wipe down/wash sanded bare iron with water.
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>>7336207
>cast iron
>heats up quickly
am I getting trolled here? cast iron has its uses but quick reaction to heat changes is not one of them.
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>>7336634
>Modernist Cuisine

Did you really pay $500 for a fucking cookbook when it's obvious you don't even cook?
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>>7336898
hey stupid? you know this "internet" thing you are on right now? turns out you can download books on at, often at no charge! I sure hope you managed to read this, since I'm not there to grunt it out to you.
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>>7336922
So you don't even cook.
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>>7336922
And you're poor.
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>>7336939
>>7336976
>reviving 8 year old reaction pics
get with the times grandpa, i bet you still think "the cake is a lie" is the height of comedy
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OP here. I just tried a vinegar bath. All the rust definitely came off but after a drying, it still rusted all over within 15 minutes.
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>>7337002
>the cake is a pie
FTFY
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>>7335504
>brand new
>old seasoning

Just get an actual new one you autist
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>>7337467
dry it completely in the oven. then season it immediately after.
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>>7337538
I'm getting sick of people giving pointless advice that's been rehashed a million times. You don't think all the stuff you people are saying I haven't already googled and tried? Drying in the oven results in a new layer of rust.
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>>7337467
Like magic!
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OP here, I thought of a method that I don't see why it wouldn't work.
>1. Remove rust normally.
>2. Put pan back in vinegar bath.
>3. Final touch up scrub.
The pan in this state should be as free of rust as humanly possible. Being in the vinegar bath should prevent new rust.
>4. Rinse with vinegar, not water.
>5. Slather copious amounts of oil.
>6. Repeat until the oil has mostly replaced the vinegar.
This way, there is only vinegar and oil coming into contact with the pan, minimal air and water.
>7. Bake in oven with a thick coat of oil.
Instructions say to use a thin coat to prevent uneven coating and sticky residue. This is likely valid however a thin coat might let air and rust in.
>8. Redo the oil every 10 minutes for a few times to prevent uneven coating and sticky residue.
>9. Final oil spread will be thin and left in the oven for a longer time.
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>>7337684
http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/11772/is-it-safe-to-cook-wine-or-vinegar-in-cast-iron

Low pH and cast iron aren't great together
you aren't going to ruin it with a little vinegar, but acidity and heat will speed corrosion.

All I do:
Apply oil and check on it every few minutes.
If I see a dry (dull looking spot among glossy sheen) area starting to form, wipe with oily rag, back into oven.

Rust won't even start to form if you oil it soon enough, just don't go nuts with the oil because too much built up too fast can lead to a tacky surface.

If rust has started to form, it's not a big deal.
A little surface oxidation isn't going to ruin it. Wipe with oily rag until oil comes up clean, back into oven.

If you use it frequently, the bottom and outside areas will oxidize anyway. Just keep it dry and scrub those areas with a wire brush from time to time to keep the oxidation build up from getting too harsh. Season the whole thing if you need to store it for a prolonged period to avoid pitting.

You could try getting even more complicated with baking soda or some such after the vinegar, but none of that is needed.
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>>7337684
Just get some Barkeeper's Friend.
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>>7337586
i think you'll need to remove all the oil you've put on. i strongly suspect you've trapped rust under the oil. then remove all rust then dry completely. if you are oven drying, you should have the oven preheated. you may be able to dry more quickly with an electric range burner if it's completely clean. (this is how you should dry your seasoned cast iron cookware after rinsing it.) then wipe with oil and season.

do not apply oil over wet. that will not work out well for you.
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>>7336179
this. dumbass OP left it in the oven and forgot about it.
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OP back. This time around, there are no patches of rust but I could still see rust under it. I had the theory that maybe everyone has the same rust situation as me, they just don't notice if the seasoning forms over the rust.

But then I saw this:
https://youtu.be/dcSb07xpyKM?t=230
His pan doesn't rust when he does the the 15 minutes at 200 degrees while when I tried that, an entire new layer of rust formed.
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>>7338314
How fucking humid is it where you live right now? Jesus fuck.
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>>7335504
>Brand new
>It still has a bunch of rust on it
Why did you buy a rusty pan you fucking retard?
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>>7338314
I don't know why the preheat step exists, but to each their own.

I wipe dry, apply fat, put in oven, though usually stove top instead of oven, because I'm usually not seasoning the whole thing, and reapply fat when needed.

On left is new seasoning. Right is after some use and a few times scouring with salt.
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>>7335504
get some steel wool, scour it, reseason
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>>7335504
>what went wrong?

You bought the cast iron meme.
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If you've got a battery charger and some wire lying around then you can strip the rust through electrolysis.
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>>7335990
>>7335990
> I immediately wiped it dry and applied oil and immediately put it in the 550 degree oven for an hour.

You probably had water still trapped under the oil you applied. After scrubbing and rinsing, put the pan on the stove over medium/low heat untill bone dry. Then apply oil and season.
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>>7337684
You know vinegar is water, right?
99% water and 1% whatever molecule makes it acidic.

Acid and cast iron don't go together, I don't even know what the fuck you were trying with vinegar in the first place. Are you a troll, or were you trolled into fucking up your pan?
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>>7338314
how's the pan now, OP?
>>
>I ran it through the oven self clean to strip the old seasoning

How the fuck are people falling for this bait.
>>
OK
RUST = OXIDATION
THERE IS OXYGEN IN WATER AND AIR
HEAT HASTENS THE PROCESS OF OXIDIZATION, THE SAME WAY IT HASTENS EVERY CHEMICAL REACTION EVER
PAPER TOWEL DOES NOT ABSORB ALL WATER

TO AVOID RUST, SCRUB WITH IRON WOOL, CLEAN WITH DETERGENT, THEN PLACE DRAINED PAN ON STOVE AT MEDIUM-HIGH HEAT. WHEN THE MIDDLE OF THE PAN IS HOT ENOUGH TO SIZZLE WATER, WIPE THE EDGE WITH PAPER TOWEL (THE REMAINING WATER LEFT BY THE PAPER WILL EVAPORATE FASTER DUE TO HIGHER TEMPERATURE, AND RUST SHOULD NOT APPEAR IN THE MIDDLE BECAUSE THE TEMPERATURE SHOULDN'T BE HIGH ENOUGH FOR SIZABLE RUST FORMATIONS TO FORM AT A QUICK RATE
COVER WITH OIL ASAP, THEN INTO THE OVEN
THIS PROCESS DEPENDS ON ATMOSPHERIC HUMIDITY, DONT DO IT WHEN INDOOR HUMIDITY IS AT LIKE 90%

The higher percentage of dumb cunts on this board rly shows
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>>7339457

Nevermind that this is an outrageously dangerous way to do that you poofter.
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>>7335504
>I can't get rust off.

Disregard all these meme methods being suggested and just look up a sandblasting shop in your area.
>>
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OP back. This thread was a good confirmation about how retarded the average 4chan user is. Has no idea what they're talking about yet spouts BS like it's fact. A few of the people in this thread weren't entirely wrong but the rest were totally wrong.

Over the past three days. I've completely stripped the pan 3 times. Applied countless layers of seasoning. And, I've removed rust and gotten to the pan to a bare grey metal literally at least 20 times. I even went so far as to build an electrolysis tub. My fingernails still now have a layer of black grime on them. I now have a good understanding of cast iron. This is another point to make, most of idiots spouting BS have never actually done anything. They just talk about their stupid ideas but never actually do anything. Yet they still think their idiotic ideas are fact.
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>>7335504

Use some WD-40.
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>>7344257
So what ended up working?

(you missed a spot)
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>>7344321
That spot wiped right off. It's not so much what worked. A lot works.
>Oven self clean cycle.
>Vinegar bath.
>Electrolysis.
>Brute force scrubbing. Note: steel wool works, sandpaper does not.

What the issue turned out to be was that I had the bad luck of it raining every single time I went to season the pan. The high humidity caused rapid flash rust. I tried way more rust removal methods than I needed to for this reason.
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>>7344257
So tl;dr you bought a pre seasoned pan, took the seasoning off for no apparent reason, wasted a ton of time, then eventually got the pan back to where it was when you bought it?
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>>7344350
You forgot the lack of self awareness and whinging about how everyone else is wrong and he's done everything right.
>>
>>7344350


In OP's defense, the preseasoning is shit, at least it was for my Lodge Dutch oven, which is why I'm here posting on this shithole autistic circle jerk of a thread.

I bought a Lodge Dutch oven a while back, and I made a few batches of very tomatoey chili. But Anon! Don't cook acidy shit in a cast iron anything! I thought the seasoning would hold up better than it did. However, I was wrong, and the seasoning dissolved away after a few family dinners consisting of chili or stew with lots of fun acidic like tomatoes in it.

So, I bought some flax seed, cleaned my dutch oven, then applied a thin-ass, almost microscopic layer of flax seed. I put it in the oven, turned it to 510F (I wanted it to be at least 500F, and I'm not sure how accurate the thermometer is at that high of a setting), and set the timer for 1 hour after the oven got up to temp.

I repeated this process twice. I didn't feel like dicking around taking the old seasoning off because I figured it was safe to leave it on there as long as something more substantial was layered over it. I might be wrong and fucked a day dicking with cast iron, but I'll figure that out later.

Anyway, I got two layers of flax seed on the dutch oven. I read on a popular article about seasoning cast iron that I need 6 layers. How true is that, especially if I didn't take the original Lodge seasoning off (except for what dissolved off during cooking)? It's got a nice glossy sheen to it, if that means anything.

Basically, I don't wanna spend my day tomorrow before work adding more layers if it doesn't need it. But I'll do it if it keeps me from having to repeat the process again.

Also, I basically typed this on my phone and added a photo. But some fucking how, 4chan says my ISP is blocked or some shit, so I had to type this all over on my computer. I got the phone like a week ago, and I haven't even been on 4chan with it since I got it, so basically 4chan's a cunt
>>
>>7344507
goddamnit! I made a few edits and didn't proofread, so I accidently some words. Anyway, everyone knows what I mean!
>>
>>7344507
OP here, don't use flax. I fell for that inaccuracy too the first time around. This was done with flax: >>7336311. Maybe more layers or no flash rust would make it look better but it's irrelevant.

This has a segment on why flax is bad. Use Crisco instead.
http://www.castironcollector.com/seasoning.php
>>
>>7344565

Bummer. I bought the flax seed oil specifically for this, and I've already got two layers on it. I guess I'll finish up the process with a few more layers and see what happens. If it's shit-tier stuff, I can start over with something different and just use the flax as an expensive cooking oil or in salad dressings or something :/
>>
>>7344893
Flax seed is just fine for cast iron don't worry about it. The only real rule about the oil is it should have a decently high smoke point other then that you are free to use whatever you want. Some people stick with neutral flavored vegetable oils and some people swear by lard both are fine it just depends on personal preference.
>>
>>7335504
550 for an hour wont do shit, You need to put it on the clean cycle for a good 3 hours which will get to 900-1000 degrees. Then soak that bitch in vinegar for a couple of days, then scrub the fuck otu of
>>
the cast iron meme claims yet another victim
>>
>>7336207
>heats up quickly
Exactly the opposite. Low thermal conductivity is one of the key characteristics of cast iron.
>>
>this is what foodNEETs have to do to save pennies
buy a new pan you fucked it up retard
>>
File: IMG_0031.jpg (2 MB, 4032x3024) Image search: [iqdb] [SauceNao] [Google]
IMG_0031.jpg
2 MB, 4032x3024
No sticking.
>>
>>7345822
W R O N G
CAST IRON CONDUCTS HEAT AT A RATE COMPARABLE TO REGULAR STEEL
WHAT CAST IRON HAS OVER STEEL IS THAT A - IT CHEMICALLY REACTS WITH OIL TO CREATE SEASONING AND B - IT'S HEAVY AS SHIT
HEAT ISN'T JUST A MEASURE OF TEMPERATURE, DESPITE POPULAR MISCONCEPTION - IT'S HEAT * MASS
IT'S WAY EASIER TO BOIL A LITER OF WATER THAN IT IS TO BOIL 5 LITERS OF WATER, AND IT TAKES WAY LONGER TO COOL A 5 POUND CAST IRON PAN THAN IT DOES TO COOL A 1 POUND STEEL PAN
NOW FUCK OFF BACK TO HIGHSCHOOL CHEMISTRY
>>
>>7348485
>chemically reacts with oil to create seasoning
Where do you get your ideas from, anon?
>>
>>7344257
The entire culture of "sending women back to the kitchen" only filled the kitchen with fucking wifey material idiots who think vegan is a viable culinary practice.
Keep practicing, and start thinking of a way to cover those two sprouts on the side while the lid is on. After frying in cast iron you'll want to practice braising, and maintaining a consistent temperature in the pan means you'll want to minimize heat fluctuation. Making sure steam doesn't escape helps.
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